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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"




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Date 

February 2 
February 2 
February 2 
February 15 
February 16 
February 18 
February 18 
February 23 
February 23 
February 23 
March 8 
March 22 
March 23 
April 6 
April 14 
April 20 
April 20 
April 22 
April 22 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 


\ 




1977 COMMITTEE MEETINGS 


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INDEX 






Committee 


Time 


Page Nos. 


Budget & Finance 


9:30 a.m. 


5179-5186 


Executive 


11:00 a.m. 


5187-5197 


Faculty & Educational Policy 


12:45 p.m. 


5199 


Buildings & Grounds 


11:00a.m. 


5201-5207 


Faculty & Educational Policy 


10:00 a.m. 


5209-5213 


Student Affairs 


10:00 a.m. 


5215-5225 


Health Affairs 


1:00 p.m. 

1 


5227-5234 


Budget & Finance 


9:00 a.m. 


5235-5250 


Long-Range Planning 


1:00 p.m. 


5251-5259 


Executive 


3:00 p.m. 


5261 


Buildings & Grounds 


10:00 a.m. 


5263-5270 


Student Affairs 


10:00 a.m. 


5271-5280 


Faculty & Educational Policy 


10:00 a.m. 


528 1 -5289 


Executive 


11:00 a.m. 


5291-5292 


Student Affairs 


10:00 a.m. 


5293-5300 


Budget & Finance 


10:00 a.m. 


5301-5313 


Long-Range Planning 


1:00 p.m. 


5315-5330 


Faculty & Educational Policy 


10:00 a.m. 


5331-5340 


Health Affairs 


1:00 p.m. 


5341-5348 


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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



INDEX (continued) -- 1977 COMMITTEE MEETINGS 



Committee 



Date 




May 


4 


May 


4 


May 


10 


May 


18 


May 


18 


May 


18 


May 


24 


May 


24 


May 


25 


June 


1 


June 


1 



June 1 
June 21 
June 23 
July 21 
July 28 
August 3 
August 11 
August 26 
August 31 
September 8 



Buildings & Grounds 
Budget & Finance 
Faculty & Educational Policy 
Budget & Finance 
Long-Range Planning 



Health Affairs 



Student Affairs 



Buildings & Grounds 
Faculty & Educational Policy 
Budget & Finance 



Health Affairs 



Executive 



Budget & Finance 



Student Affairs 



Buildings & Grounds 



Executive 



Faculty & Educational Policy 



Executive 



Buildings & Grounds 
Budget & Finance 



Student Affairs 



Time 



Page Nos. 



9:00 a.m. 5349-5356 

10:30a.m. 5357-5359 

3:00 p.m. I 5361-5365 

9:00 a.m. 5367-5371 



1:00 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 
10:00 a.m. 

1 :30 p.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 



5373-5379 
538 1 -5382 
5383-5388 
5389-5394 
5395-5398 
5405-5410 



10:30 a.m. 5411-5412 



11:00 a.m. 



5399-5403 



10:00 a.m. 5413-5418 



9:30 a.m. 5419-5422 



10:30 a.m. 



5423-5426 



12:00 noon 5427-5429 



10:00 a.m. 



9:30 a.m. 



5431-5432 



5433-5435 



10:00a.m. 5437-5442 



10:00 a.m. 5443-5457 



10:00a.m. 5459-5463 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



INDEX (Continued) — 1977 COMMITTEE MEETINGS 



Date 



Committee 



September 12 Health Affairs 
September 14 Budget & Finance 
September 14 Executive 



October 5 
October 5 
October 5 
October 19 
October 20 
October 27 



Budget & Finance/Buildings & Grounds 

Executive 

Faculty & Educational Policy 

Faculty & Educational Policy 

Buildings & Grounds 

Student Affairs 



Time 



12:30 p.m. 



9:00 a.m. 



11:00 a.m. 



9:00 a.m. 



11:00 a.m. 



12:30 p.m. 



November 2 Budget & Finance 

November 16 Budget & Finance 
December 1 Buildings & Grounds 



1:00 p.m. 



10:00 a.m. 



9:00 a.m. 



2:00 p.m. 
1 :30 p.m. 



December 1 Faculty & Educational Policy/Student Aff. 3:00 p.m. 



December 7 Budget & Finance 

December 7 Executive 

December 21 Budget & Finance 

December 22 Faculty & Educational Policy 



9:00 a.m. 



11:00 a.m. 



3:30 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. 



-in - 



Page Nos. 



5465-5467 



5469-5475 



5477-5478 



5479-5484 



5485-5486 



5487 



3:00 p.m. 5489-5495 



5497-5502 



5503-5511 



5513-5516 



55U-5527 



5529-5533 



5535-5539 



5541-5542 



5543-5546 



5547-5554 



5555 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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ATTENDANCE 



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5173 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUDGET AND FINANCE 

February 2, 1977; 9:30 a.m. 
Room 308 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 
Trustees Dennis, Rowland, Shearer and Troy; Secretary Hardy; 
Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustee Gordon 

Other Trustees : Trustees Cronin, Marks and McNulty 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis , Vice President for Manage- 
ment and Business Affairs; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director and 
Assistant Vice President; Mr. Searson, General Counsel to the 
University 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; 
Mr. Beatty, Budget Office; Mr. Hogan, University Controller 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget 
and Control 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Cathey , Controller; Dr. 
Membrino*, Professor Smith, Faculty Representative 

Guest : Mrs. Shukri, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 9:37 a.m. by Chair- 
man Carlson. The first agenda item was a discussion by the Com- 
mittee on the Concurrence in Appointment of Vice Chancellor for 
Administration and Finance — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-060) . At the 
request of the Chairman, President Wood opened the discussion. 
He explained briefly that this was a critical appointment for 
the Worcester campus. The opening of the Hospital had increased 
the complexity of the management operations, he said, and manage- 
ment currently consisted of a two-man operation — Chancellor 
Bulger and Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for Health Services, com- 
prising the management team. The recommendation for the Vice 
Chancellor for Administration and Finance, he said, came as the 
end result of an exhaustive search. 

Chancellor Bulger then explained the search process, 
indicating that many people had applied, from which six or seven 
persons were selected for interviews. The criteria for the 



UM/Worcester — 
Concurrence in 
Appointment of 
Vice Chancellor 
for Administra- 
tion and 
Finance 
(Doc. T77-060) 



"5180 



B&F Comm. 
2/2/77 



Establishment 
of Paul Whitney 
Rhoades and 
Carolina Pree 
Rhoades Educa- 
tional Trust 
Fund 
(Doc. T77-054) 



Sales of 
Securities 



General 
Electric 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

position included the need for experience and proven ability. 
Chancellor Bulger said that it was necessary for both the campus 
and the public to know that the campus was in experienced hands. 
He added that experience in the scientific world was also 
important. The candidate being recommended, he said, had both. 

Trustee Dennis inquired why the candidate had stayed 
at his position at New York University for so short a time. 
Chancellor Bulger replied that he had also asked this question 
and had learned that Mr. Campbell lived on Long Island, did 
not like the commuting and did not wish to move his family to 
Manhattan. Mr. Campbell, he said, came highly recommended. The 
Chairman said since there was consensus among the Committee, he 
would report the Committee's concurrence in this appointment. 

Chairman Carlson then turned to the second agenda item, 
the Establishment of Paul Whitney Rhoades and Carolina Pree 
Rhoades Educational Trust Fund (Doc. T77-054) . At the request 
of the Chairman, Treasurer Johnson explained that Mr. Rhoades, 
a member of the Class of 1915, had left the sum of $25,000 for 
"the establishment of a permanent endowment to provide scholar- 
ships for students majoring in the study of landscape archi- 
tecture. The will, he said, had been written broadly enough 
so that the scholarships could be modified to accommodate chang- 
ing terminology and changes in department names. There was no 
discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

acceptance of the bequest of Paul W. Rhoades 
in the amount of $25,000 to establish the 
Paul Whitney Rhoades and Carolina Pree Rhoades 
Educational Trust Fund as an Endowment Fund 
in accordance with the terms of the Last Will 
and Testament of Paul Whitney Rhoades, 
Doc. T77-054, and to delegate to the 
Chancellor /Amherst Campus the selection of the 
recipient (s) of the scholarship (s) established 
by said trust; provided, however, that the 
Trustees, in consultation with the Provost/ 
Amherst Campus, shall designate the academic 
area(s) eligible under said trust and the 
department to participate in the nomination 
process in accordance therewith. 

Chairman Carlson then turned to the matter of the 
Sales of Securities Received in Support of Trust Funds, support 
material for which had been circulated in advance of the meeting. 
He said that three separate votes would be required under this 
item and asked if there were any questions. There being none, 
on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer of the University 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



of Massachusetts, to sell 146 shares of General 
Electric Company unregistered stock and to 
deposit the net proceeds from said sale in 
addition to the check for $26.62 in the 
Polymer Science General Electric Foundation 
Grant Fund, all as described in Doc. T77-055. 



It was further 



VOTED 



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To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson to 
sell 5.443 shares of Massachusetts Investors 
Trust received as a stock dividend so that 
the proceeds may be added to the principal of 
MHR Wrestling Scholarship section of the 
Barber Endowment Fund/Amherst . 



It was also 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer of the University 
of Massachusetts, to sell 1500 shares of Old 
Republic International common stock and to de- 
posit the proceeds from said sale to the Spiegel 
Memorial Fund/Boston. 



In addition, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer of the University 
of Massachusetts, to sell 200 shares of Beneficial 
Finance Corp. common stock and to deposit the 
proceeds from said sale to the Spiegel Memorial 
Fund/Boston. 

Chairman Carlson asked Mr. Janis , Vice President for 
Management and Business Affairs, to comment on the next agenda 
item, the Authorization to Sell Securities Received for 
Designated Purposes. Mr. Janis explained that the purpose of 
this authorization was to make it possible for the Treasurer to 
sell stock received as gifts when the value did not exceed 
$20,000, without the necessity of Committee approval. In the 
case of endowments, he said, the Committee would retain its 
authority to act. Counsel Searson said he saw no problem with 
this delegation, and Chairman Carlson stated that it would 
lighten the Committee's agenda, making possible the handling of 
other, more urgent matters. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees delegate 
to the Treasurer of the University, and as 
directed by the Treasurer, or in his absence, 
to the Associate Treasurer and Assistant Treasurer 



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B&F Comm. 
2/2/77 



Foundation 

Grant for 

Polymer 

Science 

(Doc. T77-055) 



Massachusetts 
Investors 
Trust Stock 
to support 
MHR Wrestling 
Scholarship 



Spiegel 
Memorial Fund 
(Doc. T77-056) 



Authorization 
to Sell Secur- 
ities for 
Designated 
Purposes Given 
Designated 
Members of 
Treasurer's 
Office 



"5182 



B&F Comm. 
2/2/77 



UM/Worcester — 
Establishment 
of Amino 
Acid 

Analyzer 
Trust Fund 
and Usage 
Fee Schedule 
(Doc. T77-058) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for the time being in office the power and 
authority to invest and reinvest the surplus 
cash in trust funds of the University of 
Massachusetts in savings accounts, savings 
certificates, certificates of deposit, re- 
purchase agreements, or Treasury notes and 
bills; to sell securities received by the Uni- 
versity or in the name of the Trustees of the 
University when the value thereof does not 
exceed $20,000, depositing the proceeds there- 
of to the appropriate accounts; to open new 
accounts for University funds; to make deposits 
in and withdrawals from accounts in the name of 
the University of Massachusetts; and to sign 
or endorse in the name of the University of 
Massachusetts or the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts such official 
documents and vouchers, including checks, drafts, 
letters of credit, certificates of deposit and 
withdrawal orders as require the signature 
of the financial officer of the University, 
provided that all checks, drafts, letters of 
credit, certificates of deposit and withdrawal 
orders in an amount of $10,000 or more shall 
require the signature of any two officers named 
herein. 

The next agenda item was the matter of the Establish- 
ment of Amino Acid Analyzer Trust Fund and Usage Fee Schedule — 



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UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-058) , and Chairman Carlson asked 
Chancellor Bulger to comment. Chancellor Bulger said that the 
Amino Acid Analyzer was a piece of existing equipment, used as 
a basic research tool. Since personnel from other departments 
as well as individuals from outside the University will wish to 
use this equipment, it is suggested that a trust fund be 
established and fees charged for the use of the equipment. 
Chairman Carlson asked if the operation would break even, to 
which Counsel Searson replied that it is a requirement that all 
trust funds be self-supporting. Chancellor Bromery explained 
that the equipment is originally purchased with State or Federal 
funds. By establishing trust funds and charging user fees, it 
is possible to maintain the equipment without cost to the State. 
Chancellor Bulger said that the machine would be used by people 
on research grants and, therefore, State funds would not be 
involved. There were no further questions, and on motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

establish the University of Massachusetts/ 
Worcester Amino Acid Analyzer Trust Fund, 
which shall have as a purpose the maintenance 
of a testing program for the amino acid analyzer 
at the Medical Center. 



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"5183 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 


B&F Comm. 
2/2/77 


1 




The costs of this self-supporting program will 




■ 




be recovered from charges to sponsored re- 








search contracts and grants to University 








of Massachusetts personnel, as well as to other 








state agencies and nonprofit institutions. 








Disbursements from said fund shall be on the 








authority of the Chancellor or his designee. 






It was furth 


er 






VOTED : 


To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
establish the following usage fees for the 
Amino Acid Analyzer, Medical Center, said fees 
to be paid into the Amino Acid Analyzer Trust 
Fund for the maintenance and operation of the 
testing program outlined in Trustee Document 
T77-058: 

Usage Fee Schedule 




1 


I. 


Usage Fee of $50/analysis *) **) 

Personnel of the University of Massachusetts 
Medical Center and affiliated hospitals 

University of Massachusetts personnel 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Institutions 






II. 


Usage Fee of $100/analysis *) **) 

Non-Profit institutions conducting biomedical 
research 






III. 


Waiver of user fee: 

By petition, primarily for University of Massa- 
chusetts Medical Center personnel lacking grants 
or other appropriate funds approved by the 
Chancellor or his designee 





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*) Analysis of biological fluids 
**) Discount of 10 percent for series of more than 
10 samples. 
Discount of 20 percent for series of more than 

20 samples. 
(These discounts are justified by the reduction 
in the number of calibration runs required.) 

Chairman Carlson asked Chancellor Bulger to comment 
on the proposed Medical Education Trust Fund — UM/Worcester 



-5- 



UM/Worcester-- 
Medical 



"5184 

B&F Comm. 
2/2/77 

Education 
Trust Fund 
(Doc. T77-066) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(Doc. T7 7-066). Chancellor Bulger said that one of the things 
the faculty at the Medical School should do is to go into the 
community to teach courses to physicians at other institutions. 
One likely result of such a program, he said, would be that those 
physicians who participated in the program would tend to refer 
complicated cases back to the specialists who taught the courses. 
He said the faculty would receive no increase in salary for pro- 
viding this service. In response to a question from Trustee 
Dennis, Chancellor Bulger said that this was a major activity 
of medical schools. Where there are affiliated institutions, 
he said, the process is now becoming formally institutionalized. 
President Wood added that one of the most desirable goals of the 
Medical School is the training of physicians and said he was 
happy to see plans for this activity underway. Chancellor 
Bulger, responding to a query from Trustee Marks, said that 
beginning costs for this trust fund would be met by funds trans- 
ferred from other trust funds currently in existence, which would 
be abolished when the new fund had been established. Mr. Janis 
added that at the time of the mid-year budget review, some fees 
would be examined. All fees for the University would be examined, 
he said, at the time the fee-based budgets were reviewed in the 
spring. He added that trust funds, since they are not State fund;?, 
provide one of the few opportunities for the University to acquire 
a surplus, as they do not have to be returned to the State at the 
end of the year. There was no further discussion, and on motion 
made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

establish the University of Massachusetts/ 
Worcester Medical Education Trust Fund, which 
shall have as a purpose the providing of 
programs in professional continuing education 
to physicians and other allied health pro- 
fessionals. Programs for the lay person may 
be offered from time to time as they relate to 
continuing needs for medical education. These 
programs do not involve the award of University 
credit . 

This self-supporting trust fund will fund 
direct administrative services such as 
personnel, equipment, supplies, program 
development costs, program coordination, 
printing of brochures and use of media as well 
as direct instructional costs. University of 
Massachusetts Medical School faculty will 
not receive additional compensation for teaching 
in the program. 

The Chancellor of the Worcester campus is 
hereby delegated the authority to establish 
and modify from time to time at his discretion 
the fees and charges for said programs. 



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"5185 



B&F Comm, 
2/2/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees abolish 
the Continuing Education (3-52000, 0-19395) and 
the Oral Surgeons Conference (2-50020) Trust 
Funds and authorize the transfer of any balances 
remaining in said trust funds into the University 
of Massachusetts/Worcester Medical Education Trust 
Fund, 

Chairman Carlson introduced the last agenda item, Fund 
Transfers — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-061) , asking Mrs. Hanson, 
Budget Director, to comment. Mrs. Hanson explained that there 
were a small number of transfers necessary in order to allow 
certain departments to continue their programs until the time of 
the mid-year budget review. Without the transfers, she said, it 
would be impossible to encumber funds in sufficient time to meet 
immediate expenses. For the benefit of the new Trustees, Mrs. 
Hanson explained that the University had the authority to transfer 
money between accounts within the total budget. Several times a 
year, she said, these transfers were made; in addition, the 
University had the authority to transfer small amounts when 
necessary between Board meetings, such transfers to be reported al 
the next Board meeting. Chancellor Bulger remarked that now 
the Hospital had been opened, it was important to keep the budgets 
for the Hospital and the Medical School separate. 

Trustee Dennis said he was always disturbed to see 
transfers from the 01 account to the 02 account, since positions 
in the 01 account were authorized by the Legislature, whereas 
those in the 02 account were discretionary. He said, however, 
he realized these transfers were necessary. Chairman Carlson 
added that this was the result of having to submit the budget 
before the Legislature had issued a list of authorized positions, 
an unusual situation. President Wood said he agreed with Trustee 
Dennis that transfers in these accounts were poor policy as a 
rule. Chancellor Bromery added that there was a system of checks 
for the Board because not only did it have to authorize the 
transfers, it also had to authorize the positions. There being 
no further discussion, on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the fund transfers at the University of Mass- 
achusetts at Worcester as set forth in Trustee 
Document T77-061. 

Chairman Carlson stated that although this completed 
the formal agenda for the meeting, he would entertain questions 
from the Trustees with regard to the University Controller's 
response to the State Auditor's reports, which had been 
circulated. Trustee Dennis asked if the variances in figures 



UM/Worcester 
Fund 

Transfers 
(Doc. T77-061) 



-7- 



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186 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

had been reconciled. Mr. Hogan, University Controller, said that 
most of the variances were the result of the varying reporting 
dates. Often adjustments had been made before the audit was 
received. Mr. Janis added that the University computer system 
was more sophisticated than any other system in the State and 
the auditors, therefore, were not familiar with it. The State 
Auditors had accepted the University Controller's responses, he 
said. 

Chairman Carlson then asked Mrs. Hanson to outline 
briefly the upcoming budget cycle. She said that the principal 
focus of the February 23 meeting would be a mid-year review of 
campus programs, statistical information on enrollments and trust 
funds, and information on budget adjustments which would be re- 
quired for the campuses, the President's Office, and the Common 
Services. The March meeting, she said, would again consider 
tuition waivers based on information provided by a sophisticated 
student resource survey, and some changes to the current policies 
may be recommended. In April, new fees and fee increases would b 
considered — the first round of the operating budget; there would 
also be a report on the student health fee at UM/Boston; and 
discussion of the financing of the Campus Center garage and the 
dormitory system at UM/Amherst. In May, the Committee would deal 
with the end-of-the-year fund transfers, the projected fee-based 
budgets , and would begin the development of the operating budget 
for FY 1978. 

Chairman Carlson asked when the Committee would be con- 
sidering adjustments to the FY 1978 maintenance budget, and Mrs. 
Hanson replied that this would probably occur in February or 
March. 

There were no more questions and the meeting adjourned 
at 10:30 a.m. 



B&F Comm. 
2/2/77 



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(UxXlL 



Dorothy Eich^l 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE: 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

February 2, 1977; 11:00 a.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Robertson, Rowland, Troy; Secretary Hardy; 
Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Miller, Miss Eichel 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Gordon and Spiller 

Other Trustees : Trustees Breyer, Burack, Cronin, Dennis, Eddy, 
Marks, McNeil, McNulty, Shearer; Mr. Callahan representing 
Trustee Anrig; Secretary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis , Vice President for Manage- 
ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academ- 
ic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cass, 
Executive Assistant to the President and Director of the In- 
stitute for Labor Affairs; Mr. Donahue, Director of the Institute 
for Governmental Services; Mr. Bench, Assistant Counsel; Mrs. 
Hanson, Budget Director and Assistant Vice President; Mr. Kaplan, 
Assistant Vice President for Organization and Management; Mr. 
Searson, General Counsel to the University; Mr. White, Director 
of Public Information 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. DeNyse, Personnel Director; 
Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Mr. Beatty, Director of the Office of 
Budget and Institutional Studies; Ms. Tillona, Special Assistant 
to the Chancellor; Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Professor Sulzner, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Mr. Edmonds, Personnel Director; Professor Boelcskevy, 
Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 
Health Affairs; Mr. Smith, Provost; Mr. Blue, Personnel Manager; 
Professor Smith, Faculty Representative 

Invited Guests : Mr. James M. Howell, Chairman, Council for 
Northeast Economic Action; Mr. Arthur Menard and Mr. Martin 
Skoler, Labor Counsels; Linda Frankel, Executive Director, 
Council for Northeast Economic Action 

Chairman Healey called the meeting to order at 11:10 
a.m. He welcomed Trustees Marks and McNulty to their first 
Board committee meeting. The need for a special meeting in 



~5i87 



Council for 
Northeast 
Economic Action 



5188 



Exec . Coram. 
2/2/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

January, he said, had not developed. He apologized for the 
change in location of the present meeting from Worcester to 
Boston. He then turned to the first item of agenda, Council for 
Northeast Economic Action , and asked President Wood to introduce 
James R. Howell, Chairman of the Council. President Wood noted 
that Mr. Howell was also Chief Economist and Senior Vice Presi- 
dent of the First National Bank of Boston. A transplanted 
Texan, he had been active in efforts to strengthen the economy of 
New England almost since the day of his arrival. He said that in 
his seven years as president no theme had been more recurrent 
than the need for a linkage between the economy of the Common- 
wealth and the University. To accomplish this the Institute for 
Governmental Services, under Mr. Donahue's direction, had begun 
and fostered numerous activities linking the world of work with 
the world of teaching. 



Last year, the President continued, Mr. Howell had 
secured funding for a program to design better methods of develop- 
ing effective public policies in the field of economic develop- 
ment in New England, especially in the region's older urban 
areas. As the council staff was very small and not geared to pro- 
viding research capability, it required an association with an 
academic institution and had asked UMass to be that institution. 
Because the Council had a unique program and because of the 
University's long involvement in similar activities, a coopera- 
tive agreement between the two would soon be signed. The 
University will supply needed technical assistance to the Council 
Such assistance is to be coordinated by Mr. Donahue and Vice 
President Lynton. The only loss to the University from the arrange- 
ment had already occurred. Linda Frankel had left the University 
Office of Management and Business Affairs to become Executive 
Director of the Council. 

Mr. Howell expressed his appreciation for the oppor- 
tunity to speak with the Trustees and praised Ms. Frankel 's 
work with the Council. Noting that he was the only member of a 
sixth generation family to migrate from the South, he said he 
felt particularly vulnerable. If the economy of New England 
could not be saved, he would also be the only family member to 
have twice been on the losing side. He said his father had been 
a college president in the Texas A. and M. system and that 
colleges and universities in the South had a long history of mak- 
ing major contributions to the economic development of the region 
This had not been the case in the Northeast. In his view the 
revitalization of the area's economy was dependent on building 
a better public policy in order to generate money for programs 
in the central cities. He said the lack of federal funds coming 
to the area was partly due to the submission of poorly written 
proposals. He proposed to have the Council work with scholars 
from the University in order to overcome this problem, and to 
develop better qualitative decisions. President Wood thanked 
Mr. Howell for his remarks. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



"5183 



Exec. Comm. 
2/2/77 



Faculty and 
Staff Compen- 



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The meeting turned next to the second item of agenda, 
Compensation for University Faculty, Professional Staff and 
Non-union Classified Employees (Doc. T77-069). President Wood | sation 
said the Board had a long established policy of insuring equitable;! (Doc. T77-069) 
treatment for all University employees and the vote now before the 
meeting reflected this policy with regard to all non-union 
employees. He said the vote would place the Executive Committee 
in a state of readiness to convene as soon as possible and approve 
such adjustments as were appropriate. Chancellor Bromery said the 
personnel at UM/Amherst should know that the actual date that 
agreement was reached on compensation had little bearing on the 
amount employees would receive, as the adjustments would be retro- 
active. He also pointed out that the University would face even 
more difficult problems in granting pay increases in FY 1979 and 
succeeding years. As a point of information, he noted that the 
payroll office at Amherst was set up to pay any increases within 
three to four days after Board approval. In answer to Chairman 
Healey ' s question, Chancellor Bromery said that no faculty member 
had received increases. This was due to delays caused by legal 
matters and lack of assurances of the necessary funding. 

Chairman Healey asked Mr. Menard to discuss the legal 
issues involved. Mr. Menard said that the vote, if approved, 
would enable the Trustees to act quickly in approving appropriate 
adjustments. Trustee McNeil asked what would be the effect of a 
faculty vote to form a collective bargaining unit. Chairman 
Healey said the Governor and the Legislature would have to decide 
whether to honor any ensuing collective bargaining agreements. 
He then asked Mr. Cass how long it would take the Legislature to 
act on these matters. Mr. Cass said that the Legislature would 
not act until the Governor had submitted a deficiency budget. 
After that, legislation would be enacted within two to three 
weeks . 

Professor Sulzner said he was disappointed by such 
comments. He said the cost-of-living adjustment and a possible 
collective bargaining agreement were two separate issues. He 
said that nothing could convince faculty of the worth of organiz- 
ing more than delays in action by the Board. He said the 
University had approved agreements with union employees but would 
have to delay agreements with other employees until the Legisla- 
ture acted. He said he had read that the Governor was reluctant 
to release the funds available for salary increases. Secretary 
Parks said there had been no reluctance on the part of the 
Governor. Increases for all state employees not covered by the 
Alliance agreement required legislation. The funds necessary to 
grant increases comparable to those given the Alliance had been 
set aside and were available. 



Trustee McNeil asked how soon after Board approval of 
collective bargaining agreements employees would receive increase 
Chairman Healey said this would depend on how quickly the Legisla 



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"5190 



Exec. Comm. 
2/2/77 



Collective 
Bargaining 
Agreements 

Doc. T77-062 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ture acted. One basic issue, he said, was the possibility of 
the Board committing an unfair labor practice if it granted 
increases to non-union employees at this time. Mr. Menard said 
that if the University took action before the Legislature did, 
this could be construed as an unfair labor practice. Should the 
Legislature mandate salary adjustments, it would be an unfair 
labor practice not to act. 

Trustee Breyer then summarized the issues. Some 
University employees belong to unions, some do not. As of the 
moment, none had received pay increases. Since the state had 
negotiated a pay raise with union employees, the question now 
centered on whether non-union employees should also receive in- 
creases . If there were a law mandating that non-union employees 
were to receive increases equivalent to those granted the 
Alliance, there would be no problem. In the absence of such a 
law an increase could be seen as a bribe to influence collective 
bargaining agreements . 

Professor Boelcskevy said that the Massachusetts 
Teachers Association had wanted the runoff election on faculty 
collective bargaining held earlier than it had been scheduled, 
but the University's labor counsel had not agreed to this. Mr. 
Menard said this was not the case. The State Labor Commissioner 
had set the date. 

Trustee Robertson said he was somewhat confused by the 
remarks of the Faculty Representative from Amherst. The first 
law of collective bargaining elections was that management was 
not allowed to promise anything of value during the course of an 
election. Given the realities of the situation, the Board could 
not be accused of delaying action, rather the Trustees were try- 
ing to obey the law. 

There being no further discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

authorize the Executive Committee to convene 
at the call of the Chairman as soon as 
possible consistent with all pertinent laws 
in order to approve for non-union employees 
of the University, including faculty, pro- 
fessional staff and classified employees, 
such adjustments as are appropriate to all 
circumstances at that time. 

The next item of agenda, said Chairman Healey, was the 
matter of the approval of the following agreements: Agreement 
Between Trustees of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst 
and American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees , 
AFL-CIO, State Council 41, Local No. 1776 (Doc. T77-062) , Agree- 
ment Between the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and U.M.EIA . 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chapter of M.S.E.A. and M.S.E.A . (Doc. T77-063), Agreement Be- 
tween the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester , 
and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal 
Employees, AFL-C10, State Council 41, Local 1776 (Doc. T77-064) , 
and Agreement Between the University of Massachusetts at Boston 
and the Maintenance Trades Council of New England, AFL-CIO 
(Doc. T77-068). At Chairman Healey's request, Mr. Janis spoke 
to the item. Mr. Janis said agreements had been concluded with 
four of the seven unions on the several campuses. The four agree- 
ments, now before the Board, covered 94 percent of the University s 
organized employees. Negotiations were continuing with the re- 
maining three unions. 

The negotiating process, Mr. Janis continued, "required 
a lot of lawyering and a lot of paper work." Before negotiations 
begin, campus personnel officers, the Chancellors, labor counsels 
and the President's Office discuss the hundreds of issues involved 
to determine which of these are University-wide matters and which 
are campus matters. The Chancellors approve every position 
taken vis-a-vis the unions. The University compiles a notebook 
which includes all the data — "the game plan" so to speak — which 
includes the University's beginning position in negotiations with 
the union and what its final position will be. To date, the 
University has never had to go beyond its final position in the 
negotiation of union contracts. 



The agreements concluded so far have included a number 
of improvements from the University's point of view: all the 
wages and salaries are consistent with the Commonwealth's settle- 
ment with the Alliance; the unions have conceded the right of the 
University to subcontract; the University has been able to 
"collapse" unions into fewer bodies with which to negotiate; 
it was possible to obtain funding for grievances, and lay-off 
procedures have been streamlined. Assuming that the Board 
approves the agreements, said Mr. Janis, the Governor would have 
60 days to act to approve or disapprove them. The agreements, 
he said, are contingent upon the allocation of funds by the 
Governor. In response to a question, Mr. Janis replied that Mr. 
George Bennett, Director of the Office of Employee Relations for 
the Commonwealth, had indicated that the University's share of 
the $32 million was $2,387 million. 

Professor Sulzner said he wished to be recorded on 
behalf of the Faculty Senate as being in favor of the unionized 
employees' receiving their increases at the earliest possible 
date, regardless of the date increases would be received by non- 
union employees. Vice President Lynton replied that it was 
expected that both adjustments would occur at approximately the 
same time. 

There being no further discussion, on motion made and 
seconded, it was 



Exec. Comm. 
2/2/77 

Doc. 

T77-063, 
T77-064 and 
T77-068 



-5- 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Agreement Between Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst and American 
Federation of State, County and Municipal Em- 
ployees, AFL-CIO, State Council 41, Local No. 
1776 (Doc. T77-062) be approved; provided, 
however, that no wage increases as specified in 
said Agreement shall become effective until the 
Governor has approved said Agreement and has 
transferred sufficient funds to the University's 
maintenance accounts to meet the cost of the 
salary increases provided by said Agreement. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

Agreement Between the University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst and M.S.E.A. and U.M.E.A. Chapter 
of M.S.E.A. (Doc. T77-063) be approved; provided, 
however, that no wage increases as specified in 
said Agreement shall become effective until the 
Governor has approved said Agreement and has 
transferred sufficient funds to the University's 
maintenance accounts to meet the cost of the 
salary increases provided by said Agreement. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

Agreement Between the University of Massachusetts 
Medical Center, Worcester and the American 
Federation of State, County and Municipal 
Employees, AFL-CIO, State Council 41, Local 
1776 (Doc. T77-064) be approved; provided, 
however, that no wage increases as specified 
in said Agreement shall become effective until 
the Governor has approved said Agreement and 
has transferred sufficient funds to the 
University's maintenance accounts to meet the 
cost of the salary increases provided by said 
Agreement. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

Agreement Between the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston and the Maintenance Trades Council of 
New England, AFL-CIO (Doc. T77-068) be approved; 
provided, however, that no wage increases as 
specified in said Agreement shall become effective 
until the Governor has approved said Agreement 
and has transferred sufficient funds to the Univer- 
sity's maintenance accounts to meet the cost of 
the salary increases provided by said Agreement. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey called next for discussion of the 
proposed Amendments to the Trustee By-laws , which had been 
circulated to the Trustees 30 days before the meeting, as re- 
quired. President Wood recalled that at the October meeting of 
the Executive Committee, the Trustees had adopted a rule for the 
regulation of executive sessions, pending an opinion from the 
Attorney General on the applicability of the so-called "open 
meeting" law to the Board. The Attorney General's opinion 
had now been received, he said, and it seemed appropriate to 
incorporate this procedure into the Trustee By-laws. Counsel 
Searson added that this was merely a housekeeping matter, since 
the rule would remain in effect whether or not the amendment 
was adopted. Mr. Healey said that the Executive Committee had 
taken the prior action in order that the rule could be submitted 
to the Attorney General as a matter of record before he made his 
decision. Since a by-law amendment required a 30-day notice 
before action could be taken by the Trustees, this seemed an 
expedient way to handle the matter. 

Secretary Parks said that he had proposed some changes 
to the proposed amendment as circulated to the Trustees, the 
language of which he felt would make the amendment a stronger 
document. Trustee Carlson stated his belief that if the change 
was of a substantive nature, then the proposed change also re- 
quired 30-days' notice to the Trustees. Chairman Healey ex- 
pressed his view that although by-law amendments require a 30-day 
notice, amendments could be made within the scope of the by-law. 

Trustee Rowland then moved that the previously adopted 
rule be incorporated into the Trustee By-laws. President Wood 
proposed an amendment to Trustee Rowland's motion to include the 
amendment proposed by Secretary Parks to the first paragraph of 
Section 6 and the deletion of subsection 10. Trustee Rowland 
agreed to the amended motion and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board that the By-laws of 

the Board of Trustees (Doc. T76-051A) be amended 
by inserting after Section 5 of Article II the 
following new Section: 

" SECTION 6 . EXECUTIVE SESSIONS . By vote of a majority of 
the Trustees present at any meeting, the Board may enter 
into executive session, closed to the public. The vote shaL 
be taken by roll call and the purpose of the session and the 
reasons why it is to be confidential shall be announced in 
advance of the vote. The presiding officer shall state 
before the executive session if the Board will reconvene 



O 



T3S 



Exec. Comm. 
2/2/77 



Amendments to 
Trustee By- 
laws : 

Article II, 
Section 6 > 
Executive 
Sessions ; 
Article III, 
Section 12, 
Health 
Affairs 
Committee 



"5194 

Exec. Comm. 
2/2/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

after the executive session. The Board shall maintain 
accurate records of its executive sessions, setting 
forth the date, time, place, members present or absent 
and action taken at each executive session. The records 
of any executive session may remain secret as long as 
publication may defeat the lawful purposes of the 
executive session, but no longer. All votes taken in 
executive session shall be recorded votes and shall 
become a part of the record of said executive session. 
Upon request of any member of the Board, any vote taken 
in its executive session shall be verified by a roll call, 



Executive sessions may be held only for the following 



purposes 



(1) to discuss the reputation and character, 
physical condition or mental health as well 
as the professional competence of an individual; 

(2) to consider the discipline or dismissal of, or 
to hear complaints or charges brought against an 
individual; 

(3) to discuss strategy with respect to collective 
bargaining or litigation if an open meeting 
may have a detrimental effect on the bargaining 
or litigating position of the university; 

(4) to discuss the deployment of security personnel 
or devices; 

(5) to consider allegations of criminal misconduct; 

(6) to consider the purchase, exchange, lease or 
value of property or contracts if such discussions 
may have a detrimental effect on the negotiating 
position of the governmental body and a person, 
firm or corporation; 

(7) to comply with the provisions of any general or 
specific law or federal grant-in-aid requirements; 

(8) to consider the award of honorary degrees and 
other awards; 

(9) to consider the hiring or promotion of personnel." 

Mr. Carlson voted in opposition. 

Chairman Healey asked if there was any discussion 
on the second proposed amendment. There being none, on motion 
made and seconded, it was 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board that the By-laws of the 
Board of Trustees (Doc. T76-051A) be amended by 
striking out Section 12 in Article III and insert- 
ing in place thereof the following new section: 

" SECTION 12 . THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS . 
The Committee on Health Affairs shall review, 
consider, and make recommendations relative to 
all University health affairs matters, including 
but not limited to academic and other programs, 
health care, delivery systems, and cooperative 
arrangements with public and private agencies, 
institutions, and other entities." 

The next matter of business was a draft version of An 
Act to Improve Statewide Oversight, Coordination and Planning for 
Higher Education submitted to the University for advice and 



"5195 



Exec. Comm. 
2/2/77 



comment by Secretary Parks. President Wood said that the proposal! Higher 



had been forwarded to the Trustees together with an analysis of 
it prepared by University Counsel. Chairman Healey asked for 
Trustee volunteers to form an ad hoc committee to review the 
proposal and advise the full Board. The current proposal, he 
noted, was not as far-reaching as the proposals which the Board 
had considered during the past year. Secretary Parks said the 
Governor felt strongly that there was a need for reorganization. 
The bill had not been submitted to the Legislature pending 
comments from the various segments of public higher education. 
Chairman Healey said the Board would be happy to hear the position 
recommended by the ad hoc committee, but that no action could be 
taken without a vote of the full Board. 

Professor Sulzner said that some sections of the 
proposal reflected the Governor's attitude toward higher 
education and should more appropriately be directed to secondary 
schools. Secretary Parks expressed the opinion that certain 
minimum standards should be met by graduates and that the 
public was crying for accountability. President Wood said 
legislation such as that proposed, which attempts to set 
academic standards, always a prerogative of faculty, strikes 
at the very heart of academic freedom. Trustee Troy suggested 
that possibly it would be to better advantage to set minimum 
standards for entrance into institutions of higher education, 
rather than at the end of the process. He said the secondary 
schools were not doing their job and the University should not 
be expected to take the secondary schools "off the hook." 

Chairman Healey asked if there was any objection to his 
proceeding to appoint a committee to look into the proposal. 
There was none. 



Proposal for 
Reorganization 
of Public 



Education 



-9- 



"5196 

Exec. Comm. 
2/2/77 



Fair 

Information 
Practices 
Regulations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey turned them to the Fair Information 
Practices Regulations (Doc. T77-069) . Counsel Bench said that 



the Board had approved a set of Interim Regulations (Doc. T7 7-005) 
j&nd had asked the administration to return at a later date with 
(Doc. T77-059) iany amendments which seemed desirable. The revised regulations, 

le said, included amendments of a technical, rather than a sub- 
stantive, nature. Trustee Cronin asked if a faculty member in- 
dicated that he did not object to the release of his course 
evaluation, could it then be released. Bench replied that anyone 
could release his own evaluation if he so desired. 



There being no further discussion, it was moved and 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees rescind 
its vote of August 4, 1976, approving and 
adopting the University's Interim Privacy and 
Confidentiality Regulations (Doc. T77-005) , and 
that the Board approve and adopt in place there- 
of the University Fair Information Practices 
Regulations (Doc. T77-059) ; further, to recommend 
that the campuses and the President's Office 
be directed to prepare and publish simplified 
guidelines for the implementation of the Regulations 
and for informing individuals of their rights and 
responsibilities under the Regulations. 

The next agenda item was the Postponement of Review 
of Medical Center By-laws . There was no objection to this 
action and it was moved and seconded and 



I 



UM/ Worcester- 
Postponement 
of Review of 
Medical 
Center 
By-laws 



UM/Wo re ester — 
Appointment of 
Vice 

Chancellor for 
Administration 
and Finance 
(Docs. T77-060 
-067) 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

vote of the Board on September 8, 1976, be amended 
by striking the words "February 2, 1977" and 
inserting in place thereof the following: 
"the June, 1977 meeting of the Board." 

The last agenda item was the Concurrence in the 
Appointment of James R. Campbell as Vice Chancellor for Administra 



tion and Finance — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-060 and Doc. T77-067) . 
Kt Chairman Healey' s request, President Wood introduced this 
item, informing the members of the Executive Committee that the 
structure of and need for this position had been discussed 
, earlier at the meeting of the Committee on Budget and Finance. 
Trustee Carlson added that the growing complexity of the UM/ 
Worcester campus made this a very necessary and important function 
He said that Mr. Campbell comes to the University very highly 
recommended after an extensive screening process and was as good 
a choice as could be found. The Budget and Finance Committee 
recommended favorable action. 

Secretary Parks asked how Mr. Campbell's salary com- 
pared with salaries of similar positions at the other campuses. 
President Wood replied that the proposed salary was within the 
salary range for the position, although it was higher than the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

salary paid for the position at UM/Boston. This reflected the 
higher salaries generally of persons associated with the medical 
professions. Trustee Burack asked as to the number of finance 
officers at Worcester. Chancellor Bulger replied there was a 
director of financial affairs, a controller and a hospital 
director. 

Trustee Robertson said he felt this was a necessary 
position and although the salary was high, he felt that "you 
get what you pay for." Trustee Troy asked if the Vice Chancellor 
for Administration and Finance would be filling the position of 
Hospital Director. Chancellor Bulger said that the Vice 
[Chancellor would discharge those responsibilities in addition to 
many others . 

Secretary Parks remarked on the size of the various 
campuses in relation to the salaries involved, to which Mr. 
Carlson replied that it is sometimes a question of supply and 
demand. Secretary Parks said he just wanted to flag the matter, 
to which President Wood replied that it had been flagged very 
early. There being no further discussion, it was moved and 
seconded, and 



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Exec. Comm. 
2/2/77 



VOTED 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
along with the President in the appointment by 
the Chancellor of James R. Campbell as Vice 
Chancellor for Administration and Finance at the 
University of Massachusetts at Worcester, as set 
forth in Doc. T77-060. 



and further 



I 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the personnel action as set forth in Trustee 
Document T77-067. 

There being no further business, the meeting was 
adjourned at 1:05 p.m. 




Dorothy Eicljyel 
Assistant Secretary to the Board of 
Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

February 2, 1977; 12:45 p.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Troy; Trustees Breyer, 



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Burack and Cronin; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Committee Members Absent : Trustees Fielding, Morgenthau and 
Winthrop 

The meeting was called to order at 1:05 p.m. by Chair- UM/Amherst — 
man Troy, who moved that the February 1977 Preliminary Graduation ; Approval of 
Lists — UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-065) , previously circulated to the \ February 1977 

There being no opposition to the motion, 



O 



189 



Committee, be approved, 
it was seconded and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 

approve and ratify the Graduation Lists of 

February 1, 1977, UM/Amherst, certified by the 

recorder of that campus and contained in Doc. 
T77-065. 

There being no further business, the meeting was ad- 
journed at 1:10 p.m. 



UJladysVK 



&ji-lU— *• 



v 



dys w Keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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(Doc. T77-065) 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

February 15, 1977; 11:00 a.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

ATTENDANCE: Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Spiller, Trustees 
Burack, Clark, Dennis, McNulty; Secretary Hardy, Treasurer 
Johnson; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Eddy and Winthrop 

Office of the President : Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for 
Planning; Mr. Bench, Associate Counsel; Mr. Brigham, Senior 
University Planner 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Littlefield, Planning Director; Mr. Simpson, 
Planning Office 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Meehan, Planning Director; 
Mr. Prince, Planning Director-designate 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor for Administration 
and Finance; Mr. Greig, Director of Physical Plant 



The meeting was called to order at 11:18 a.m. by 
Chairman Spiller. Chairman Spiller said he considered three items 
of the agenda as major concerns for the Committee, and to allow 
sufficient time for discussion of these items, they would be 
taken up first. He stated his concern about the exposure of the 
Trustees and President on these matters. 

The first item introduced by Chairman Spiller was the 
Seawater System Design — UM/Boston. He asked Mr. Meehan, Plan- 
ning Director at UM/Boston, to comment on the problems with this 
system and the steps which have been taken to correct the faults, 
as well as what further steps are necessary to make the system 
function properly. Mr. Meehan referred the Committee to a 
letter which had been circulated to those present, summarizing 
the problems, which he said were the result of faulty design. 

There is a $200,000 appropriation to cover the design 
fee for necessary revisions to the system. The Bureau of Build- 
ing Construction has awarded to Francis Associates the contract 
for this design work. The Bureau originally proposed a solution 
which would result in unsightly 37-foot cooling towers located 



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UM/Boston — 
Seawater 
System Design 



"5202 



B&G Comm. 
2/15/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

on the dike. Francis Associates has now suggested a system of 
heat exchangers which could be housed in a second-floor extension 
on the pump house or in a building near it, which would solve the 
problem of aesthetics. Schematic design drawings should be ready 
to bring to the Committee in approximately two months. In 
addition, an appropriation of $225,000 was approved for repairs 
to keep the present system operating. The BBC has recognized the 
liability of the designers on two problem areas - the Library 
roof and the ventilation system in College I - said Mr. Meehan, 
but has not addressed the matter of liability in the seawater 
system. 

Chairman Spiller asked what legal action the University 
had taken against the designer. Mr. Bench, Associate Counsel, 
said that the University could not initiate legal action, it 
could only request that action be taken by the Attorney General 
for the Bureau of Building Construction. Chairman Spiller furthef: 
expressed concern that the University should be in the position 
of having to obtain money for redesign and repair even though 
the fault lies with the BBC's having accepted inadequate design 
work. He asked for a written report on this matter to be 
distributed before the next meeting of the Committee. 

Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning, said that 
the University had to take whatever steps are necessary to 
develop and maintain a functioning system, in order that the 
campus does not face the danger of closing down, regardless of 
where the legal blame lay. She noted that the very fact that the 
BBC had awarded a contract to redesign the seawater system was 
the result of considerable hard work and perseverance on the part 
of the Harbor Campus and particularly the Director of Planning, 
Mr. Meehan. Chairman Spiller asked the University Counsel to ask 
the Attorney General to seek legal redress from the designers. 
What is required, he said, is essentially the replacement of the 
current system, at a cost of some $2 million. Mrs. Robinson said 
that the University's capital outlay request for FY 1978 included 
$2 million for the correction of this problem; the Governor's 
recommendation, however, does not include money for this item. 

Mr. Meehan explained for the benefit of Trustees who 
were not familiar with the system that it was basically an 
electrical system with several large compressors. The seawater 
used in the system resulted in corrosion, which in turn caused 
failures in the equipment. In answer to a question, he noted that 
the redesigned system would result in some energy conservation. 
Chairman Spiller asked that a commitment of a given date be 
obtained from the BBC for the correction of the problems of the 
system. Trustee Burack expressed her belief that it is an affront 
to the citizens of the Commonwealth for the BBC to ask an 
engineering firm to serve as the consultant on the problems in 
the steam lines at the Tillson Power Plant at UM/Amherst when the 
same firm was the cause of the problems in the seawater cooling 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

system at UM/Boston. Chairman Spiller suggested that perhaps the 
Committee should request the Trustees to initiate a letter 
expressing their indignation with this situation. He said that 
although the Trustees could take no other action, they could 
comment publicly. Mr. Meehan said the schedule for the seawater 
cooling system now calls for completion of the redesign in six 
months, bids a month or two later, and completion of the work by 
the summer of 1978. He stressed the importance of completing the 
work, as there has already been a failure in one of the machines 
that was completely retubed after the original corrosion problem. 

Chairman Spiller said he believes that the University's 
legal staff should be more actively involved in these matters. 
He asked the personnel at UM/Boston to develop a chronology which 
will indicate how long the University has been pursuing this 
problem, the steps that have been taken, and what steps are still 
necessary and when these steps need to occur. 

Chairman Spiller next turned to the matter of the roof 
of the Library at UM/Boston. Mrs. Robinson said that the designer 
had originally agreed to assume full responsibility for correct- 
ing the problems with the roof but had later indicated that his 
insurance agent had advised against this. Funds were requested 
in FY 77 to cover the cost of roof repairs should the designer 
not assume the responsibility, but the money was not appropriated 
In January, 1977, the BBC asked the University to reinstate the 
item for FY 78 and wrote a letter confirming the Bureau's 
responsibility for this request. An appropriation of $195,000 
has been recommended by the Governor in House I. (The University 
requested $150,000.) 

Chairman Spiller said he believed the University should 
take whatever steps are required, first, to get the necessary 
repairs made and, second, to get satisfaction from the original 
designer. He suggested that the legal staff of the University 
press the Attorney General to act on this matter as well. 

Chairman Spiller then introduced the item on the Till- 
son Power Plant — UM/ Amherst. At his request, Mrs. Robinson 
called attention to a letter distributed to the Committee on this 
matter and then summarized the background of the problem. She 
said the Environmental Protection arm of the Attorney General's 
office had called to say they were prepared to file suit to shut 
down the old power plant for non-compliance with pollution control, 
regulations. Since the new plant is not yet operable, she said, 
this would effectively shut down the campus. Two meetings 
ensued, she said, between University personnel and the Attorney 
General's office. At the University's insistence, the second 
meeting included representatives of BBC and the Executive Office 
of Administration and Finance. As a result, an agreement had been 



-3- 



B&G Comm. 
2/15/77 



UM/Boston — 
Repairs to 
Library Roof 



UM/Amherst — 
Tillson Power 
Plant 



^r^;" 



B&G Comm. 
2/15/77 



UM/Worcester — 
Sitework 
(Doc. T77-070) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

reached that on or about April 15 the BBC will name a date when 
the new plant will be operational, and, based on that date, the 
University will set a date when it will cease to use the old plantf. 
Chairman Spiller asked if the meeting could have occurred any 
earlier, to which Mrs. Robinson replied that the Attorney General 
office had canceled several earlier appointments because of 
schedule conflicts. Mr. Littlefield, Planning Director at 
UM/Amherst, said that as a result of the latest meeting he had 
received a preliminary report on the condition of the tie lines. 
Step 1 of the process outlined in the letter from Mr. Corkin of 
the Attorney General's office occurred on schedule. He said that 
it will be known on February 17 if Step 2 is also on schedule. 

Chairman Spiller and other members of the Committee 
pointed out that they had expected the Chairman to be invited to 
the earlier meetings and as he had not, the Committee directed 
staff to ensure his attendance at the next meeting between 
University and Commonwealth personnel on this matter. 

Chairman Spiller asked that the Committee consider next 
the matter of Sitework-UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-070) , which 
required action. At Chairman Spiller 's request, Mr. Brigham, 
Senior University Planner, outlined the sitework planned at the 
Medical School and Hospital, emphasizing the projects covered by 
FY 77 capital outlay funds. He then reviewed the history of 
planning for parking at the Medical Center. The original plan for 
the campus, prepared in 1968, proposed an 1800-car parking 
facility. A more detailed feasibility study, completed in 
1975, resulted in a schematic design for a 1,020 car garage, with 
the potential for phased construction. Mr. Brigham said that the 
sitework to be undertaken later this year will eliminate the mall 
area and the area behind the Medical School as temporary parking 
lots; thereby adding to the need to deal with the parking problem. 
He said that parking needs continue to increase, but that it was 
also becoming increasingly clear that the building of a garage 
presents problems. The cost to construct a garage and the fee 
structure required to support it both present major financial 
headaches . 



Trustee Burack asked if the institution of parking fees 
would be accepted by campus personnel. Chairman Spiller said 
there was resistance to paying a fee for parking. Mr. Campbell, 
Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance at UM/Worcester , 
said he did not consider the matter of fees a major issue. He 
was much more concerned about the massive outlay of money that 
a parking garage would require. He said he felt parking lots 
would result in a more equitable arrangement. 

Mr. Brigham continued his report, saying that in looking 
for a workable alternative to building the garage, it seemed that 
the provision of additional parking spaces could be accomplished 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

without adversely affecting the appearance of the campus. Cur- 
rently there are 400 spaces available in finished lots. The 
balance of present needs, about 500 spaces, is met through the 
use of temporary lots. The alternative proposed would provide 
for 1,000 - 1,100 spaces in surface lots, in lieu of the 1,020 
car garage and 241 surface spaces proposed in the earlier 
feasibility study. With the completion of these facilities, there 
will be a shortage of about 100 spaces in 1979, based on current 
estimates for the growth of the Medical Center. 

As the complex continues to grow, it will become 
increasingly difficult to handle peak conditions without finding 
new spaces located at a distance from the Medical Center complex, 
with the possibility of a shuttle bus system from the lots to the 
campus. There are, he said, 200 spaces available in the park off 
Lake Avenue, across from the Medical Center, which can be used 
except during the summer, when the daily population of the campus 
is also smaller. The University owns other land in the vicinity 
which could be used for parking, but which is less convenient to 
the Medical School and Hospital. He stressed that the decision 
to utilize surface lots would trade lower fees for the lessened 
accessibility of parking areas. 

Chairman Spiller asked if the additional lots could 
be provided as part of the sitework covered by the $1.1 million 
FY 1977 capital outlay appropriation. He asked if the approval 
of the proposed vote would involve any new capital outlay money. 
Mrs. Robinson replied that 300-400 additional spaces in the 
proposed new lots could be provided within the $1.1 million site- 
work appropriation. The future phased addition of lots would 
require future capital outlay, but the amount of money involved 
would be small when compared with the cost of a parking garage. 
The lots, as opposed to the garage, would mean a construction 
cost saving of several million dollars. 



Trustee Burack suggested the advisability of informing 
the public that the University had abandoned what would have been 
an expensive garage in favor of less expensive surface parking 
lots. Chairman Spiller agreed, saying it would be helpful to tel 
the public what the master plan for the campus had originally 
included, and how the University had worked to reduce the cost 
without sacrificing the appearance of the campus. On motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the site plans for the development of the 
Medical Center be amended to include the 
development of additional surface lots 
within the perimeter road system; further, 
that the need for a parking structure be 
re-examined in the light of further growth 
of the Medical Center and its surrounding 
area. 






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B&G Comm. 
2/15/77 



"5206 



B&G Comm. 
2/15/77 

Columbia 

Point 

Planning 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The next item for consideration was the matter of 
planning for Columbia Point, and Chairman Spiller asked Mr. Bright 
to brief the Committee on developments in this area. Mr. Brigham 
reported that as a result of work begun by President Wood last 
year in meeting informally with parties interested in the 
peninsula area, a planning committee composed of 15 persons from 
the private business sector, 21 representatives of institutions, 
city agencies and the Columbia Point housing development is now 
working on ways to improve conditions throughout the peninsula. 
At first, he said, participants had felt that there was little 
hope of transforming the area because of conditions at the 
housing project; but there is now a sense that progress is being 
made and that this progress must continue. The successful 
completion of modernization work at the Columbia Point housing 
project, he said, is vital to any plans for the community. The 
planning committee, he said, will shortly be organizing itself 
into three subcommittees on Housing and Related Community 
Activites, Retail and Commercial Development, and Public and 
Private Investment. Chairman Spiller said that the current 
committee was an outgrowth of initial activities involving 
Mrs. Robinson, Edward Lashman and himself; and was the result of 
the persistence and dedication of the President of the University 
The advent of the Kennedy Library and the State Archives building 
had, he said, given impetus to reviving planning for the area. 



Trustee Dennis asked for more information about 
planning for the peninsula. As a Trustee, particularly a member 
of this Committee, he felt it was important that he have more 
detailed knowledge of the University's role and involvement in 
the development of the area. He said he is frequently asked abou 
what is going on and senses that there is still some unease on 
the part of the community that the University would take over the 
area. Trustee Burack said that she too knew very little about 
the University's activities in this endeavor and would like to 
be better informed. 

Chancellor Golino said that although three years ago 
when he arrived on campus, the community did not feel well 
informed as to the University plans for the area, it now feels 
it has a part in the planning. 



Chairman Spiller said that at the next meeting, time 
would be allotted for a further briefing on the Peninsula Planning 
Committee. Trustee Clark said that the housing project is the 
victim of years of neglect by the Commonwealth. She emphasized 
the need for mixed-income housing in the area in addition to the 
present public housing, but said that it must not be built at the 
expense of the present residents. Trustee Dennis indicated that 
he had many questions related to this subject. Chairman Spiller 
suggested that information be sent to Committee members in advance 
of the meeting. 



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Chairman Spiller then turned to the matter of the 
Medical and Clinical Sciences Building- — UM/Worcester , asking 
Mr. Greig, Director of the Physical Plant, to report. He said 
that the Medical Center is encountering some of the same types of 
problems faced by the other campuses concerning the performance 
of the BBC. The Federal government, he said, is pressing for 
completion of the Medical School so that it can reimburse the 
Commonwealth for $1.8 million of the construction costs. The 
Medical Center and the Trustees have not yet accepted the buildings 
because certain punch list items have never been corrected. 
Mr. Poitrast, Director of BBC, is preparing a separate contract 
to do this work, he said, since it has been unable to obtain 
satisfaction from the original contractor. Trustee Burack suggested 
that pressure from the Federal government be used as a goad to 
the BBC. 

Chairman Spiller asked for a status report on the 
University Hospital . Mr. Greig said the University had taken 
over the hospital except for Level 9, the mechanical floor. 
Mrs. Robinson asked when Mr. Greig expected the hospital would be 
ready for acceptance. He said his estimate was six months. 

Since several members of the Committee had other 
commitments, further review of capital construction projects was 
deferred to another time. 

Chairman Spiller asked the Committee for its guidance 
as to when they should next meet. It was the sense of the 
Committee that a meeting early in March would be desirable. 

There being no further time for discussion, the meeting 
was adjourned at 12:45 p.m. 



"5207 

B&G Comm. 
2/15/77 

UM/Worcester- 
Medical and 
Clinical 
Sciences 
Building 



/^A^ZZ^y-Oc^Lut^ 



Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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UM/Worcester- 
Hospital 



~5208 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

February 16, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Troy; President Wood; 
Trustees Breyer , Burack, Crain, Morgenthau; Mrs. Blues tone rep- 
resenting Commissioner Fielding; Mr. Colby representing Commis- 
sioner Winthrop; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustee Cronin 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Father Walsh, Academic Advisor to the President; Mr. 
Bench, Associate Counsel to the University; Mrs. Weiner, Assist- 
ant Vice President for Academic Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Provost Puryear 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino 

Guests : Mrs. Shukri, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 10:10 a.m. Chair- 
man Troy welcomed Trustee Crain to the Committee. He then asked 
Mr. Lynton to discuss the first item of business, Boston Library 
Consortium Membership . Mr. Lynton said that a number of librarie^ 
had been working together as a Consortium informally for about 
four years. They now wished to formalize and incorporate this 
arrangement and had invited UM/ Amherst to join as a founding mem- 
ber and UM/Worcester to join as an associate member. The library 
at Amherst had worked with the Consortium since its formation, 
having provided the computer capability necessary to produce a 
machine readable union list of serials held by member libraries. 
There had been some reluctance to invite the UM/Boston campus on 
the part of some members of the Consortium; a reluctance based 
mainly on emotion rather than substance. This had dissipated and 
UM/Boston will be asked to join as the first of the new members 
after the Consortium is incorporated. Mr. Lynton said membership 
in the Consortium would not make vast differences in library serv- 
ices but would serve as a useful adjunct to those services. 

Chairman Troy asked how the Boston Consortium compared 
with the Hampshire Interlibrary Center of the Five Colleges. 
There are some similarities, Mr. Lynton said, but more important- 
ly, the Boston Consortium is compatible with H.I.L.C. Chairman 
Troy said that the experience at H.I.L.C. had shown that there 
were indirect cost savings in such arrangements, but that the rea 



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>209 



Boston Library 

Consortium 

Membership 



"5210 



F&EP Comm. 
2/16/77 



Executive 
Session 



UM/ Amherst — 
Promotion of 
Dr. Richard 
Ellis to 
Associate 
Professor of 
Mathematics 
and Statistics 
with Tenure 
(Doc. T77-072) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

benefit came from enrichment of library resources through sharing, 
Trustee Burack asked if the computer capability included readouts 
of journal articles at remote terminals. Mr. Lynton said the pro- 
gram was not that sophisticated; currently one could only receive 
information as to available titles. Trustee Crain said that the 
library at the New England Telephone Company's Learning Center 
had the technology necessary to provide readouts. However, he 
cautioned that in any cooperative venture one should realize that 
not all participants would cooperate to an equal extent. Mr. 
Colby asked if the Consortium had a common computer network or if 
special equipment was needed. Mr. Lynton said he could not speak 
to the technical details of the operation but that UM/Amherst was 
supplying the computer capability for maintenance of the Consor- 
tium's union list of serials and some common purchasing and com- 
mon cataloging. In response to Mr. Colby's further question, Mr, 
Lynton said the computer hardware at all participating institutions 
was compatible. Also, the University Counsel had looked at the 
incorporation document and found it to be straightforward. Chan- 
cellor Bromery said membership in the Consortium was one step 
toward joining a similar nation-wide network based in Chicago. 
Trustee Burack asked who would be allowed to use the service. 
Mr. Lynton said the service was available to faculty and graduate 
students and, with some limitations, undergraduates. There being 
no further discussion, it was moved and seconded, and 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees accept the 

invitation that the University Library of the Amhers 
Campus join the Boston Library Consortium as a found 
ing member. 

Chairman Troy said personnel matters next on the agenda 
were items dealing with tenure and it was moved and seconded, 
and on roll call, unanimously 



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VOTED: 



To enter executive session at 10:26 a.m. 



At 11:40 a.m., the Committee 

VOTED : To end the executive session. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur in 

the promotion by the President of Dr. Richard Ellis 
to Associate Professor of Mathematics and Statistics 
with tenure at the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst, as detailed in Doc. T77-072. 

Trustee Burack voted against the motion and asked that the record 
show that she was not voting against the individual involved, but 
because she was opposed to the granting of tenure on initial ap- 
pointment as a matter of policy. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur in 
the appointment by the President of Dr. Edwin L. 
Thomas as Associate Professor of Polymer Science 
and Engineering with tenure at the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst as detailed in Doc. T77- 
071. 

Trustees Burack and Crain voted against the motion: Trustee 
Burack for the reason already given; Trustee Crain because the 
documentation submitted to the Trustees was inadequate. 

The meeting then turned to the final item of business, 
Future Agenda Items . President Wood said members of the Commit- 
tee should be aware of the collective bargaining situation. In 



K* t™'*' 

o 



F&EP Comm. 
2/16/77 



UM/Amherst — 
Appointment of 
Dr. Edwin L. 
Thomas as 
Associate 
Professor of 
Polymer Science 
and Engineering 
with Tenure 
(Doc. T77-071) 

Future Agenda 
Items 






the matter of the collective bargaining election results, it was 
his opinion that the most significant factor was the drop in the 
number of voters. Other factors were the "cross-pressure" situa- 
tion between the AAUP and MTA, and the "bread and butter" 
voters' feeling that governance was not working. A special meetinjg 
of the Executive Committee had been scheduled February 23, 1977, 
at 3:00 p.m. Prior to the meeting, his office would prepare an 
overview report that would provide background information about 
the union, and options and recommendations to the Board as to how 
it wishes to proceed in the initial steps which would be taken. 
The election results, he said, make it clear that the relation- 
ships in the present governance arrangements would have to be re- 
structured; and the professional capacity of the President's and 
Chancellor's Offices would have to be re-examined. He said that 
the University faced a period of adjustment, perhaps painful, and 
that certain faculty would have to be, or would be, disabused of 
the notion that things would go on as they had in the past. The 
Committee on Budget and Finance will meet on February 23, prior 
to the Executive Committee meeting, and, in the course of the mid- 
year, deal with the consequences of negotiations with the union 
and the further impact on the FY78 budget request. Also imminent 
the President continued, is a report dealing with the situation 
at the Medical Center. 

Turning to the school of veterinary medicine proposed 
by President Mayer of Tufts, he said the concept was an intriguing 
and exciting one but its feasibility would require a long explora- 
tion. He said he did not want to be in the posture of an anti- 
felinist, anti-caninist , anti-equinist hangdog again, but the 
school was a long way from reality. Also, he cautioned that ef- 
forts to form the school should not result in the loss of the 
present contractual arrangements under which 23 students from 
Massachusetts were educated in out-of-state veterinary schools. 

Mrs. Blues tone asked to go back to the subject of the 
collective bargaining election. She asked if there was any infor- 



-3- 



"5212 



F&EP Comm. 
2/16/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

mation, for example, as to the reason for the relatively large 
number of non-voting faculty members. Chancellor Bromery said 
the matter was a very vexed one and he did not believe it was 
possible to say that any one thing in particular caused the elec- 
tion result. The major factor was the lack of raises of any kind 
for the faculty over a three-year period. This drove many people 
into a sense of frustration and a sense that there was nothing to 
lose by organizing. The effort to organize in 1973 had failed 
and if any salary adjustments had been forthcoming in the interim 
it probably would have failed in 1977. He said the mood on cam- 
pus was not one of faculty rejoicing, rather it was puzzlement 
as to what the faculty had done. One explanation for the poor 
turnout, he said, had to do with the AAUP supporters. The number 
of people who didn't vote in the runoff election was roughly equa 
to the number who had voted for the AAUP in the December election 
This led him to believe many AAUP supporters did not vote in the 
runoff election. 

Trustee Morgenthau asked what the effect of the election 
would be on tenure. Chancellor Bromery said that at institutions 
where faculty had organized, they had experienced very little ef- 
fect on tenure policies. Trustee Burack said that under Massachu 
setts law, conditions of work and tenure are negotiable items. 
The law was passed in 19 73 and she stressed that experiences at 
other institutions might have little relevance to the University's 
situation. Mr. Lynton noted that, in the opinion of counsel, 
existing tenure policy would remain in effect until such time as 
tenure is bargained. Father Walsh said that it was possible that 
grievances on tenure could become matters of binding arbitration 
by an outside arbitrator, as is the case in a number of institu- 
tions around the country. Mr. Lynton said that Chapter 75 stipu- 
lated that the Trustees may delegate personnel matters only to 
officers of the University, thus it was not clear if an outside 
arbitrator could be appointed. Counsel Bench said the Supreme 
Judicial Court had taken the position that School Committees 
could not delegate such authority to outside arbitrators. There 
was general agreement at the meeting that the collective bargain- 
ing process would be a costly one to both the University and the 
faculty. 



Chairman Troy asked Mr. Lynton to expand on the Presi- 
dent's remarks about the veterinary school. Mr. Lynton said the 
Tufts proposal included major involvement by the region's land 
grant institutions but that the institutions had almost no contact, 
with Tufts to learn about the details of the proposal. There had 
been only one meeting of representatives from the University of 
Connecticut and the University of Massachusetts with people at 
Tufts. The original proposal had been to disperse the clinical 
facilities among all of the land grant schools but this had been' 
shown to be impossible. The revised proposal called for major 
clinical centers at one or two schools. Mr. Lynton said the 
Tufts proposal was an interesting one but its feasibility was 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

still questionable. He said the University would continue dis- 
cussing the matter if asked. 

Chairman Troy said Trustee Gordon had suggested as a 
possible future agenda item for the Committee the general question 
of out-of-state students. The University was now limited to a 
ceiling that allowed only 5 percent of the student body to be froiji 
out of state. Chairman Troy suggested that the Committee consider 
this matter at its March meeting and that sufficient documentation 
be at hand. Trustee Burack urged that the campus admissions di- 
rectors be present, as she found it helpful in understanding mat- 
ters if the people actually involved were present to answer ques- 
tions. Chairman Troy suggested that only Mr. Tunis from Amherst 
be invited to the March meeting so that the issue there could be 
thoroughly discussed. Representatives from the other campuses 
could be invited to later meetings. 

Trustee Burack cited a number of major universities 
which had reintroduced required courses in English composition. 
She restated her longheld position that this should be considered 
by the University. Mr. Lynton said that the Provosts at Amherst 
and Boston had been asked to prepare full reports on this matter 
and these should be available for either the March or April meet- 
ing. 

Chairman Troy asked Mr. Lynton to summarize the future 
agenda items of the Committee. Mr. Lynton said these items in- 
cluded: 

1. Campus long-range plans, a possible item for the April 
meeting; 

2. The issue of tenure, including the delegation of tenure 
decisions, either April or May meeting; 

3. Multicampus Report on Adult and Continuing Education, 
perhaps the March meeting; 

4. The issue of basic skills and general education, either 
March or April. 



Chairman Troy asked Mr. Lynton about the status of the 
Multicampus Personnel Committee Report on grievance matters. Mr. 
Lynton said action had been suspended in view of the collective 
bargaining election and that the matter would now have to be re- 
studied in the context of a collective bargaining agreement. 

There being no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, the meeting was adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 



F&P Coram. 
2/16/77 





Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



-5- 



52 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

February 18, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 
Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

ATTENDANCE: {Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Shearer; President Wood; 



Trustees Crain and Cronin; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Miller, recorder 

ibsent Committee Members : Trustees Anrig, Eddy, McNeil, Morgen- 
:hau and Okin 

3ffice of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Af fairs; Mrs. Simmons, Assistant Vice President for Academic Af- 
fairs 

JM/ Amherst : Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student Af- 



fairs; Mr. Martus, Co-President, Student Government Association 

JM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 

■ 

Academic Affairs; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; 

ylr. James, Assistant Chancellor 

JM/Worcester : Mr. Feinblatt, Associate Dean and Director of Stu- 



dent Affairs; Ms. Reilly, Chairperson, Student Body Coordinating 



juest : Mrs. Shukri, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



lommittee 



Chairman Shearer called the meeting to order at 10:05 
m. She said she had met with Mrs. Simmons, Dr. Lynton and Sec- 
retary Hardy to clarify the duties and responsibilities of the 

ommittee. Mrs. Simmons had compiled a statement entitled "Duties 
and Responsibilities of the Student Affairs Committee," which 
tfas at hand. She then turned to the first item of business, 
Student Affairs at UM/Amherst. Mr. Woodbury distributed a chart 
giving an overview of the service areas within Student Affairs 

t Amherst. The budget of the operation was about $3.5 million; 

f auxiliary services such as residence halls are included, the 
total budget is over $30 million; the staff totals some 2000 full 
time employees. 

Referring to the chart he said that the Community Devel- 
opment Center was a new entity, having been organized in the sum- 
mer of 1976. It served as the counseling and programmatic arm of 
Student Affairs. The Public Safety division had in the course of 
the last five years become a professional operation. He said the 
JHealth Program was one of the most comprehensive health care pro- 
grams in the nation, comparable in scope to those at California, 
Yale and Harvard. Financial Aid was the major function in the 



v-SoCJLS 



UM/Amherst — 
Student Affairs 



-5216 



Student Affairs 
2/18/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Student Services area. As an indication of the size of the Admis- 
sions and Registration, he noted that 16,000 undergraduate appli- 
cations and several thousand transfer applications for the Academic 
Year 1977 had been processed. The Dean of Students Office served 
mainly as a crisis center and a "court of last resort" for bewil- 
dered students. The incumbent Dean of Student Services, Mr. Fielcf, 
was, in his opinion, a very valuable person. All of the divisions 
of the Resource Management Division, e.g. Residences and Dining 
Commons, were multimillion dollar operations. 

The Staff Services area had an ongoing project of great 
interest — each Wednesday a telephone survey of from 200 to 250 
students was conducted to determine the mood and attitude of the 
campus . 



In the future, Mr. Woodbury continued, he foresaw an 
increase in the number of non-traditional students. This trend, 
already apparent, would not level off at any time in the foresee- 
able future. The trend will influence the character of all areas 
within Student Affairs. His office did have problems in areas 
such as the residence halls, and these would not abate in coming 
years. 



He said costs would continue to increase. His fourth 
observation had to do with one effect of financial stringency — 
the increasing reliance on student employees, again a trend readily 
apparent and of growing magnitude. In the future a major consid- 
eration in hiring administrators will be the ability to manage 
such employees. Lastly, he added, collective bargaining would 
impact on the delivery of services in Student Affairs in a number 
of ways, none readily determined yet. 

Mr. Martus commented that the unionization of the fac- 
ulty would affect the students in significant ways and he express 
ed concern about some of the problems to be faced by students. 

Chairman Shearer asked what tasks student employees 
perform. Mr. Woodbury said students now were employed in the 
Work-Study program, and their numbers would increase. Also, when 
the predicted older students enroll, they will come with skills 
useful to the operation of Student Affairs. 



Trustee Cronin said that Mr. Woodbury had been correct 
in saying there were problem areas in Student Affairs. One of 
the most obvious was in placement and career counseling which 
had a staff of three full time professionals for about 18,000 
undergraduate students, most of whom are unaware of the Office's 
existence. Mr. Woodbury agreed that the office was understaffed 
and said that correcting this was one of his highest priorities 
in the coming fiscal year. President Wood said he had received 
a report from the placement office at UM/ Amherst and it would be 
of interest to the Committee. Placement was also a major concern 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of the Alumni and of the Trustees. 

Trustee Cronin said certain services now within Student 
Affairs, such as residence halls, belonged more properly in Ad- 
ministration and Finance. Mr. Woodbury said mental health and 
psychiatric counseling were also problem areas. Such services 
were increasingly in demand, having increased 14 percent in 
the last year, and were very costly. One reason for the increase 
was the greater age of the students. 

Professor Smith said there seemed to be many excellent 
opportunities for apprenticeships on campus. She asked if these 
were being exploited. Mr. Woodbury said this was being done in 
health affairs and in the food service areas. Mr. Martus cited 
the example of the student credit union which is managed and run 
by students. 

The meeting then turned to Student Affairs at UM/ 
Worcester. The Chairman asked Mr. Feinblatt to open the discus- 
sion. Mr. Feinblatt said the memo he had distributed to the Com- 
mittee listed the services provided by the Office of Student Af- 
fairs. Unlike Boston and Amherst, the Medical School had a very 
small student body — 305 at present, 365 expected in September, 
1977. The listing of services had been arranged on a class by 
class basis. In the first year students were given a two-day 
orientation program after which a peer-faculty advisory system 
was organized. Each newly enrolled student was introduced to 
seven or eight upper class students and to one or two faculty 
advisors. Experience had shown that students quickly outgrew the 
need for the faculty advisors. Also, in the first year, students 
were advised as to their elective program. In the second year, 
the Office of Student Affairs coordinated the clerkship programs 
and assignments and administered Part I of the National Boards. 
These Board examinations were not a prerequisite to graduation 
but their successful completion was needed for licensure in most 
states. In the third year, the student is assigned a clinical 
advisor, who helps the student determine an elective program. 
Additionally, there are programs explaining the Elective Program, 
postgraduate applications, and the National Intern Residency 
Matching Program. The NIRMP is a computer based program which 
matches the student's strengths and interests with available 
residency vacancies throughout the country. Vocational counselin 
at the Medical School is necessary even though all of the student 
are preparing for one profession. Students must be advised as to 
specialities within medicine. In the fourth year, Student Affair 
processes the Dean's letter of recommendation. Since Worcester 
operates on a pass/fail system with narrative comments on perform- 
ance, the Dean's letter is essentially a compilation of the nar- 
rative comments. Part II of the National Boards is administered 
and the NIRMP is coordinated. In the Postgraduate year, Mr. 
Feinblatt continued, a follow-up questionnaire is sent to all 
postgraduates and the third and final part of the National Boards 



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Student Affairs 
2/18/77 



UM/Worcester — 
Stuent Affairs 



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Student Affairs 
2/18/77 



UM/Boston — 
Student Affairs 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

is given. Student Affairs offered academic, personal and vocation- 
al counseling, and coordinated student housing, which is deficient, 
and the Student Health Services, and was responsible for other 
services ancillary to student life — for example, the student 
lounge. 

In response to Mrs. Simmons' question, Mr. Feinblatt 
said financial aid was run on an ad hoc basis as there was no 
financial aid officer, and that financial aid was a continuing 
problem. Mr. Lynton asked about the current status of special 
programs for students entering with deficiencies. Mr. Feinblatt 
said there were no such programs currently. The Admissions Com- 
mittee had decided that to accept students with deficiencies 
until such time as a program was available would be unfair. Ef- 
forts were being made to set up the necessary support services 
for such students as a priority item. Professor Smith pointed 
out that all departments in the basic sciences offered remedial 
type work sessions to students who were having difficulty. Mr. 
Feinblatt said students who lacked the minimum entrance require- 
ments were advised to remedy their deficiencies at an undergradu- 
ate institution. Chancellor Golino added that he and Chancellor 
Bulger had discussed the possibility of Worcester and Boston work- 
ing closely to identify possible candidates for admission to the 
Medical School at an early date. A committee was working to de- 
vise programs which would enable such candidates to meet admis- 
sions requirements. However, there was a very ticklish problem 
involved — a successful student might expect guaranteed admission 
to the Medical School. 

Ms. Reilly said that academic deficiencies needed to be 
corrected before admission because unprepared students could not 
handle a medical school curriculum. Even fully prepared, students 
had difficulty sometimes. Mr. James said a meeting of Worcester 
and Boston representatives had been held and the proposals were 
discussed, but the problem of guaranteed admissions was not re- 
solved. Mr. James said that at Tufts a given number of places 
in the Medical School were set aside for graduates of Tufts Col- 
lege. If the University of Massachusetts was seen as one univer- 
sity with three campuses, he continued, possibly an arrangement 
could be worked out whereby the University of Massachusetts Medi- 
cal School would have a relationship with Amherst and Boston some^ 
what similar to the one between Tufts College and the Tufts Medi- 
cal School, and the Boston University Six Year Program. Mr. 
Lynton said this was something that would have to be decided on 
a University-wide basis. 

Chairman Shearer then asked for a status report on Stu- 
dent Affairs at UM/Boston. Mr. Tubbs distributed a paper showing 
"Areas of Responsibilities" within the division of Student Affairjs 
He said students at Boston were non-traditional in every sense 
and problems at the campus were unlike those at most other univer 
sities. As an example he cited the great need for child care 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

facilities. There were child care centers at both the Harbor 
Campus and 100 Arlington Street. The Harbor Campus Center cared 
for 63 children on a continuing basis. This year a new drop-in 
center was being operated at the Harbor campus. A parent would 
leave a child at the center under the supervision of a volunteer 
and attend class and then, in turn, become the volunteer super- 
visor. 

Student Support Services were grouped into eight major 
areas in order to better utilize staff. In the area of Graduate 
School Advising, students were assisted in preparing for profes- 
sional admissions tests, such as the Law School Aptitude Test, 
as well as receiving academic counseling. Vocational Counseling 
and Placement had, in the past, done mainly counseling and very 
little placement. Plans were under way to change this situation. 

The 120 foreign students at UM/Boston were aided by the 
Foreign Student and International Programs Advising service. As 
with many students, these students' problems were mainly financia 
He said the Handicapped Students' Center was one of the most ex- 
citing programs on campus. The staff was highly motivated and 
students were helped in a variety of ways — from counseling to 
having papers typed. The Center has the potential to be a model 
for other schools in New England and regularly receives corre- 
spondence asking for guidance in establishing similar centers 
elsewhere. Chancellor Golino said he felt the Center's impact 
was not limited to New England. The Center had a national visi- 
bility. He said it was important to realize that the Center had 
been created by the handicapped students themselves, almost with- 
out help. It was their strength, courage and persistence that 
made the Center possible. Mr. James said the group was one of 
the most active on campus, and one of the handicapped students 
was running for the post of Student Trustee. 

The Spanish Speaking Advisors Office, Mr. Tubbs con- 
tinued, helped students in all facets of their academic careers, 
including admissions, counseling and financial aid. Another 
concept which had raised outside interest was the Returning 
Women's Program. It was not unusual to find both a mother and 
her daughter enrolled. The returnees had a variety of problems 
and there was a great deal of peer support brought to bear on 
these problems. The Testing and Program Development Service 
served as a central receiving office for achievement tests and 
information about them. Also, the service was developing an as- 
sessment capability to determine student attitudes towards the 
program. The Veteran's Counseling Office served the 1200 veterans 
on campus as a certification office, a counseling office and as 
a friend in court in dealings with the Veteran's Administration. 

Mr. Tubbs said most problems of the Financial Aid serv- 
ice stemmed from the machinery of the University which had diffi- 
culty in issuing checks when due. The internal operations of 



*^ £?*?, 



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2/18/77 



"5220 



Student Affairs 
2/18/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Financial Aid had improved greatly over the past two years. 

The Pre-Freshman Programs, as the name implies, were 
directed to students not enrolled at the University with a view 
to preparing them for college. The College Preparatory Program 
assists students still in high school. The VET program is for 
veterans not attending any school. There have been successes 
with both programs. Mr. James said mention should be made of the 
Another Course to College. Chancellor Golino said the University 
had an agreement with the Boston School System under which the 
Center for Learning and Teaching and the school teachers identify 
students who are college material but don't intend to go to col- 
lege. The students are taught and advised by UM/Boston staff as 
well as the high school staff. Successful students are guarantee^ 
admissions to UM/Boston and a number of the original participants 
in the program will receive their bachelor's degrees at the June 
1977 commencement. Mr. James said the program enrolled 100 stu- 
dents per year and there were currently 196 enrolled. He observed 
that the attrition rate of four attested to its success. Mr. 
Tubbs noted that under the University Studies Program, eleventh 
and twelfth graders could enroll for one University course. 



In the area of Student Activities, the INFO Centers 
served as an orientation medium and a general campus communicatioii 
center. The Student Activities Committee deals primarily with 
the Student Activities Trust Fund and decides which Recognized 
Student Organization will receive funding. The Advocacy Center 
is a drop-in center to help students with problems and is function- 
ally similar to the Dean of Students Office at Amherst. Mr. Tubb 
said Athletics and Recreation, for a variety of reasons, includ- 
ing inadequate facilities, were not as important to student life , is 
they perhaps should be. The students were voting on a proposal 
to impose an athletic/recreation fee and if this was approved, 
matters would improve. 



Mr. Tubbs then spoke of Health Services at UM/Boston. 
The campus offered comprehensive general medical services, phar- 
maceutical services and a wide range of counseling options. In 
the near future, an overall review of the services offered was to 
be undertaken. Also, the University was currently exploring its 
relationship to the Columbia Point Health Center, particularly 
in the area of possible contractual relationships. The final two 
components of the Health Services, the Center for Alternatives 
and the Human Sexuality Center, were mainly based on peer support 

Chancellor Golino said that one of the most important 
student support services at UM/Boston, Academic Support Services, 
was operationally part of the Office of the Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs. Mr. Steamer said the Academic Support Services 
had been decentralized and placed in each college. Thus, the stu- 
dents could in effect go directly from a classroom to the service 
He said awareness of the profile of the student population would 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

indicate the special problems to be faced. Of the student body: 
30 percent came from Boston; 38 percent came from adjacent sub- 
urbs; 22 percent from more remote suburbs; and, 4 percent came 
from outside the greater metropolitan area. Thirty-two percent 
of the students were over 25 years of age and 5 percent over 30. 
Fourteen percent were veterans. Seven percent were black, 1 per- 
cent Asian, 1 percent Indian and 1 percent Spanish speaking. 
Finally, the great majority were first generation college students; 
only 11 percent of the students' fathers were college graduates 
and only 4 percent of the mothers had graduated from college. 

The merger of the two liberal arts colleges, Mr. Steamer 
continued, made it possible to establish a Learning Center. At 
the Center each incoming student is assigned a faculty advisor 
and given a diagnostic test in mathematics and writing skills. 
There is an outreach program which contacts the students and ar- 
ranges the students' tutorial program. Workshops in writing and 
computation skills are conducted and every academic department 
offers tutorials. In some classes, tutors are in the classroom 
and available to help the students on the spot. In addition to 
the faculty advisor, professional counselors are available to 
help students with any academic problems they face. Personal 
counseling was available but this operation needed additional 
staff. Mr. Steamer said there were 6000 students in the liberal 
arts colleges and 500 in each of the professional colleges. 
Throughout the University there were 130 trained student tutors 
on staff, and they do the bulk of the tutoring. 



%3>dwJL 



Student Affairs 
2/18/77 



1, 



I 



Trustee Crain said that the profile of the student body 
would seem to indicate that counseling, both academic and persona 
was a crucial element in the education of the students. In read- 
ing minutes of past meetings of the Committee, he said, counsel- 
ing seems to have been a recurrent problem and could lead to con- 
cern about the commitment of the faculty to this aspect of Univer 
sity life. Also, he said he would like to know the amount of 
counseling conducted on a student to student basis. Mr. Tubbs 
said this was very actively done, most of the tutors being juniors 
and seniors. In the matter of personal counseling, Trustee Crain 
asked if upper division students majoring in the social sciences 
were utilized as a resource for counseling freshmen and sophomores. 
Mr. Steamer said they could be so utilized but currently they 
mainly performed tutorial duties. Chancellor Golino said the 
Center for Alternatives, which provided peer counseling 5 was one of 
the mechanisms available; another was the Human Sexuality Center. 
Mr. Lynton said that one question that had always concerned UM/ 
Boston and was still being debated was whether to opt for massive 
involvement by faculty in all areas of counseling or to have non- 
faculty people provide the services. Chancellor Golino pointed 
out that UM/Boston introductory classes in the social sciences 
had 30 students; at many other universities, the classes enrolled 
from 300 to 400 students. The faculty believed, given the non- 
traditional students on campus, that faculty-student contact was 



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Student Affairs 
2/18/77 



UM/Amherst — 
Report of 
Student 
Representative 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

very important. Chairman Shearer said the matter of student sup- 
port services at UM/Boston would be more fully explored at the 
next meeting of the Committee. 

Chairman Shearer then asked for reports from the Student: 
Representatives. Trustee Cronin said he would describe the mechan- 
ics of how the Student Government Association operates. The Asso- 
ciation could be seen as am umbrella group to students at UM/ 
Amherst. All students pay fees to the S.G.A., the fee next year 
will be $64. The Student Senate, often confused with the S.G.A. 
determines how the yearly income from students fees, about $1 mil- 
lion, is to be disbursed among the Recognized Student Organiza- 
tions. An R.S.O. is an organization of at least ten students 
which has submitted its constitution to the S.G.A. It then can 
be considered for funding by the Senate and receive other benefit^. 
There are about 500 R.S.O. and 47 receive funds from the Student 
Senate. Recipients include the student newspaper and the radio 
station WMUA. Funds are also given to projects not normally seen 
as student sponsored; for example, a Center for Educational Research 
and a Legal Services Office. Subsidies are given to the campus 
transit service and to special programs such as the Committee for 
the Collegiate Education of Black Students. The Senate also funds 
the Area Government Units. 



The Student Senate, Trustee Cronin continued, has 120 
members, each representing about 250 students. The chief execu- 
tive officer is the Speaker and there is a Treasurer. The Senate 
operates through a committee system. A separate arm of student 
government is the President's Office. Currently the office is 
held by Co-Presidents Jay Martus and Paul Cronin; the office had 
become so complex that it was impossible to continue the past 
practice of a single incumbent. 

Trustee Cronin said a recently conducted survey of stu- 
dent governments at other large universities had shown that UM/ 
Amherst offered many unique services, e.g., the Legal Services 
Office; and other student government associations frequently asked 
the S.G.A. for advice on improving their operations. Despite 
this, he continued, the students' view of the Senate was largely 
negative. A recent poll had shown that only 23 percent of the 
students approved of the way the operation was run. As an aside, 
he pointed out that this was the highest approval rate found in 
the survey; the Campus Administration had a 5 percent approval 
rate. Trustee Cronin said one factor in the negative response 
was that students weren't aware of all the activities of the 
Senate; for example, the students were aware of the Collegian 
but did not know it was Senate funded. An effort was underway to 
improve the Senate's image. 

President Wood said that the Senate, in dealing with 
the image problem, should be aware that most critics were self- 
selected and moved from one concern to another; the past concern 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

with the war had moved to the economy and now seemed to be focus- 
ed on the faculty collective bargaining election. The fact that 
the Senate was seen as a politicized force blurred the perception 
of some of its real accomplishments; for example, the Senate con- 
sistently produced budgets which made allocations in a thoroughly 
professional way. He asked if it had considered holding a SWAP 
type conference where ideas could be freely discussed in order to 
get a sense of the student mood. Trustee Cronin said such a con- 
ference of campus constituencies had been held recently and the 
sense of the meeting was that the Senate should move more into 
areas that directly affected the students, such as problems in 
the residence halls. Also, he said one of the difficulties faced 
by the Senate was that any attempt made to have an impact on any- 
thing academic caused the faculty to close ranks and resist the 
attempt. 

Mr. Woodbury said he felt that to measure the student 
impact on University life soley by what the Senate did was to 
misread the statement entirely. Another misreading was by those 
who saw the mood of most students as apathetic and a return of 
the mood of the 1950' s. President Wood said it was a gross error 
to think that this generation of students was a silent one. He 
agreed with those who found a somberness on campus but this stem- 
med from concerns about employment which overlaid a profound dis- 
enchantment with the system. There were two differences between 
the students currently on campus and those of the anti-war years 
firstly, the moral passion was no longer there and, secondly, the 
intellectual critique of the system was at least one hundred time 
better. 



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Student Affairs 
2/18/77 



UM/ Worcester — 



Representative 



Chairman Shearer asked Ms. Reilly to discuss student 
government at UM/Worcester . Ms. Reilly said student government at Report of 
the Medical School could best be described as low keyed. The stuf Student 
dents were in the process of writing a constitution but medical 
students have very little time. First-year students have more 
time, but don't have the knowledge needed to function effectively, 
Second-year students have the time and knowledge and are the chief 
source of manpower for governance. Third and fourth year studentf 
have no time. 

The main problems faced by the students were caused by 
outside factors. Housing was a continuing problem and recreation- 
al and social activities were few and far between. There were 
non-traditional students who were older and had family and work 
obligations. Also, many students had financial problems. Mrs. 
Simmons said certain financial aid matters had been sorted out 
and the picture was not as bleak as it had been. Ms. Reilly said 
there was a lack of means of communication between students; for 
example, no student newspaper, and the student body was fragmented 
outside class, compounded by the lack of any adequate space for 
gathering together. An effort was underway to collect an activities 
fee from the students to help overcome some of the problems. 



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Student Affairs 
2/18/77 



UM/Boston 
Report on 
Student 
Support 
Services 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Student Body Coordinating Committee, she continued, 
had been active along with the Dean of Student Affairs in organiz 
ing orientation for new students and in counseling, and partici- 
pated in the student-faculty advising project described by Mr. 
Feinblatt. A guide to Worcester had been published last year, 
she said. The Committee also coordinated the assignment of stu- 
dents to committees involved in the governance of the Medical 
School. Lastly, she noted that UM/Worcester did not have a stu- 
dent Trustee and this should be corrected. Mr. Lynton said the 
statute governing the University provided for student Trustees 
from Amherst and Boston, but not for Worcester. 

Chairman Shearer asked Mr. Mastone to discuss student 
matters at UM/Boston. Mr. Mastone identified himself as a stu- 
dent member of the University Assembly Steering Committee. As at 
Amherst, students formed numerous organizations which were recog- 
nized by the Student Activities Committee. The organizations 
were political, social and intellectual in nature. 

The fact that most students at UM/Boston work full time 
and many have families had a bearing on the level of student 
activities. Many people do not have time to participate. Anothe 
factor is the absence of meeting places. In one sense, he said, 
people misunderstood the students' desire for the proposed gymna- 
sium. The students weren't interested in competitive sports but 
they did want a central place to meet and possibly form athletic 
clubs. This would help foster a university spirit. 

Mr. Mastone said that he felt it was wrong to accept 
students who were not fully prepared as they tended to hold the 
prepared students back. It is better to go into the high schools 
and offer the remedial help there. 

Chairman Shearer asked Mr. Mastone if the students did 
feel they were participating in the community life of the college 
and if provisions were made to recognize their different life 
styles. Mr. Mastone said that many students, particularly those 
who got involved, did have a sense of community. He said his ex- 
erience was a case in point. Another beneficial aspect of UM/ 
Boston was the varied population of students. For example, older 
students usually knew what they wanted out of college and this 
helped younger students who weren't sure why they were in college 
This was another contribution towards a sense of community. Chait 
man Shearer said she understood such contacts and asked if they 
extended to university related issues rather than just personal 
ones. Mr. Mastone said that many students did discuss such issues 
In response to the Chairman's further question, Mr. Mastone said 
that governance at UM/Boston was at several levels. The Student 
Activities Committee, for example, was elected at large by the 
students. The main concern of the Committee was the disbursement 
of the Activity Fund. Each college has its own faculty/student 
senate. In these senates, there were divisions on issues but 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

they were almost never faculty versus student divisions. The 
overall body governing the University was the University Assembly 
The Assembly, through its committees, worked very closely with 
the Chancellor. 

Chancellor Golino said that the meeting should perhaps 
know that it had been decided some two years ago that no classes 
would meet during the hours of 12:30 to 2:00 p.m. This period 
is the only time that the campus can come together and attend 
concerts, lectures, or other attractions. He said he found it 
a useful device to foster community spirit. Mr. Mas tone agreed 
that this had been a good thing. 

President Wood said his office and the Committee Chair- 
men were undertaking efforts to have all of the Trustee Standing 
Committees deal with planned semester-long schedules rather than 
face ad hoc agenda items which arose sporadically. 

He reminded the meeting that the Committee on Budget 
and Finance and Executive Committee would be meeting on February 
23 to discuss matters as important to the University as any which 
had occurred in years. Finally, he noted that the Governor would 
visit UM/Amherst on February 23 and 24. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit 
tee, and the meeting adjourned at 12:05 p.m. 



Student Affairs 
2/18/77 



(piadyJ Keith Hardy # 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS 

February 18, 1977; 1:00 p.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Robertson; President 



Wood; Trustees Gordon and Shearer; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Miller, 
recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustees Fielding, McNeil, McNulty 



and Okin 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for Planning; Mrs. 
Simmons, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs; Ms. Veith 
Senior Associate for Academic Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Bischoff, Associate Provost; Mr. Woodbury, Act- 
ing Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Professor Friedman, 
Alternate Faculty Representative 

UM/ Bos ton : Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; 
Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, Mr. James, 
Assistant Chancellor 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Dr. Kelly, Associate Dean for 
Allied Health Services; Mr. Feinblatt, Associate Dean and Director 
of Student Affairs; Professor Smith, Faculty Representative; Ms. 
Reilly, Chairperson, Student Body Coordinating Committee 

Guest: Mrs. Shukri, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 1:20 p.m. Chairman 
Robertson welcomed Professor Friedman to her first meeting as a 
faculty representative. He then asked President Wood to discuss 
the first item of business, Scope and Activities of the Committee. 
[President Wood said the Committee had been created a year ago 
when the hospital opened. The Committee's original charge was 
clearly focused on UM/Worcester . Subsequent to the establishment 
of the Committee and in compliance with the Medical Center By- 
laws, the Hospital Management Board had been struck to advise 
and guide the Chancellor in the management of the Teaching Hospital 
In effect, the HMB dealt with many matters that were within the 
purview of the Committee on Health Affairs. Now that the HMB is 
established, it was felt that the scope of the Committee on Health 
Affairs should become University-wide and deal with matters such 
as academic programs in the health sciences and health care 
delivery on all campuses. 



Scope and 
Activities of 
the Committee 



o*c28 



Health Affairs 
2/18/77 

Overview of 
Health Related 
Curricula 
Programs and 
Services of 
the University 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting then turned to the second item of business, 
I Overview of Health Related Curricula Programs and Services of the 



University . Mr. Bischoff said the school at Amherst which was 
most deeply involved in health related curricula was the School 
of Health Sciences. The School had three units - the Division of 
Nursing, the Division of Public Health, and the Department of Com-- 
munications Disorders. The Division of Nursing has the responsi- 
bility for the preparation of nurses at the Baccalaureate level, 
which is the major function of the Division; in addition, three 
graduate clinical specialties are offered - Community Health 
Nursing, Medical-Surgical Nursing and Psychiatric Mental Health 
Nursing. The Department of Communications Disorders, which had 
once been the Department of Speech, then the Department of Com- 
munications, is the newest unit in the School and offers under- 
graduate, masters', and doctoral programs. Most undergraduates 
in the program intend to go on to graduate study as the placement 
prospects for those with bachelor's degrees are not good. The 
graduate specialties offered include Speech Pathology, Audiology, 
and Speech and Hearing Science. In the Division of Public Health 
there are three basic undergraduate majors - Community Health, 
with two tracks, one leading to a career as a school teacher, 
the other to the profession of community health educator; Envi- 
ronmental Health, graduates of which become sanitary inspectors 
and, by and large, work for public environmental agencies; Health 
Laboratory Sciences, with programs very much in demand, graduates 
working in the areas of water testing, air pollution control and 
food quality testing. At the masters level, Mr. Bischoff contin- 
ued, the Division of Public Health trains epidemiologists, health 
administrators and biostatisticians . Mr. Lynton said there was 
also considerable activity at Amherst in clinical psychology. 

Chairman Robertson asked Mr. Woodbury to discuss health 
related services at Amherst. Mr. Woodbury said he would speak 
to two areas; the University Health Services and the Health Main- 
tenance Organization, also known as the Valley Health Plan. Uni- 
versity Health Services is the primary health care agency for the 
student body. It is one of the most comprehensive health care 
programs in the nation. The staff includes fifteen doctors, 
three psychiatrists, six clinical psychologists and a number of 
dentists. There is a fifty-bed hospital and about 500 students 
are treated each day. The operation is supported mainly by stu- 
dent fees with additional monies received from federal grants and 
contractual arrangements with Hampshire and Amherst Colleges. 
The service offers several benefits not normally found in univer- 
sity health centers, including Room to Move, a federally funded 
drug abuse program; dental services; a prepaid surgical option, 
which some 60 percent of the students elect to take; an educa- 
tional environmental health and safety program; a prepaid pharma- 
ceutical option; and a "self care" center where students can 
determine if they really need a physician. As to the future, 
Mr. Woodbury said, there would be no expansion in facilities; 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

there would be an increasing demand for psychological services; 
and there would be increasing emphasis on preventive measures 
rather than therapeutic ones. 

The Health Maintenance Organization, Mr. Woodbury con- 
tinued, was a separate entity which provided prepaid medical 
coverage to staff members and their dependents. HMO had begun 
in October 1976 and some 3000 of the 5000 eligible staff members 
had enrolled; 2500 of these had chosen the service offered by the 
Amherst Medical Association; 500 the University Health Services. 
At the start of the HMO, a deficit had been predicted, as had the! 
possibility that students would be adversely affected because of 
an increased patient load, neither of these had happened. The 
contract with HMO currently gave the University an income of 
$60,000 per year; this was expected to increase to $100,000. 



At the Chairman's request, Mr. Steamer discussed academic 
programs at UM/Boston. At present, he said, there were no aca- 
demic programs in the health services area. However, the under- 
graduate management program at the College of Professional Studies 
was to be expanded to include a concentration of health care ad- 
ministration. This would train middle management people for 
hospitals and nursing homes. It would be the only such program 
at the undergraduate level in Massachusetts. Also, there was a 
developing research project, the Harbor Institute for Exploration!! 
in Adult Development, Aging and Vulnerability. The Institute 
would concentrate on thanatological and gerontological matters. 
A headquarters had been established along with the beginning of 
\ a research library. Mr. Steamer said that the Director, Dr. 
Kestenbaum, though unable to make death seem desirable was quite 
capable of making it interesting. Affiliations with kindred 
organizations, such as the Commonwealth Department of Elderly Af- 
fairs, had been established. The Institute would eventually offe:: 
undergraduate and graduate courses. Mr. Lynton said the results 
of a recent meeting of representatives from the three campuses had 
indicated that a university-wide development in this area could 
be anticipated. 



Mr. Tubbs said health services at UM/Boston included 
two health centers, the main one at the Harbor Campus, the other 
at 100 Arlington Street. Fees for the service were $22 for each 
full time student per semester; the fee for part-time students 
was $11. 

The services were primarily for ambulatory patients, 
however each center had two beds for short term conditions. The 
operation was in four areas - comprehensive general medical, 
gynecological, counseling and therapeutic, and limited surgical 
and pharmaceutical services. About 50 percent of the students 
took advantage of an optional health insurance plan which cost 
$44 per semester. The services were available to staff in 
emergency situations. 



■ObeCi&j 



Health Affairs 
2/18/77 



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230 



Health Affairs 
2/18/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Tubbs said consideration was being given to a number 
of changes in the operation - expanded physical space; an expanded 
health education program in addition to the currently operational 
Human Sexuality Center; an expanded mental health service and 
provision of a dermatologist. Also, many students had asked for 
year round health services. At present they were not eligible 
to use the services during the summer months. In response to 
Trustee Gordon's question, Mr. Tubbs said serving students during 
this period would not cause any staffing problems. Mr. Lynton 
said as the people involved were technically non-students, legal 
implications of the proposal should be explored. Professor Smith 
said it did not seem quite right to require students to gear the 
need for medical attention to the academic calendar, besides 
health insurance is purchased on an annual basis. 

Mr. Tubbs said consideration was being given to making 
the Tufts New England Medical Center Hospital the chief referral 
hospital for UM/Boston. Also, discussions were being held to 
explore possible contractual arrangements with the Columbia Point 
Health Center to provide services not presently available, for 
example, dental services. Mr. Tubbs said a long range study to 
determine what health services a commuter campus should offer was 
needed. 

Chairman Robertson asked what procedures were used in 
emergency situations. Mr. Tubbs said there was an ambulance serv- 
ice nearby and most of the Campus security personnel were trained 
Emergency Medical Technicians. There was a physician on campus 
during the day and there is a staff of five full-time nurses. 

The Chairman then called for discussion of programs and 
services at UM/Worcester other than those leading to the M.D. 
degree. Chancellor Bulger said he would describe one of the many 
clinical programs the Medical School offered to physicians and 
some of the health services offered to communities in the Common- 
wealth. Dr. Kelly, Associate Dean for Allied Health Services, 
would then describe other academic/clinical programs. He said 
the Medical School, in common with other medical schools across 
the country, was devoting an increasing amount of time in develop- 
ing a distinct program for residents which focuses on the basic 
medical sciences. The residents have graduated but have not com- 
pleted their Boards and are still learners. The School considered 
them as important as undergraduates. There were 90 residents in 
the program at present and this would increase to 100 in the futu 
In addition, the Medical School was helping other hospitals in 
restructuring their residency programs. 

The Teaching Hospital, Chancellor Bulger said, was in- 
tended to attract a full time, first class clinical faculty. A 
faculty which was in a fundamental sense devoted to education. 
Experience had shown that such a faculty teaching students in a 
quasi-apprentice system was superior to the numerous alternatives 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

tried in medical education over the last decade. In addition to 
the primary goal of educating physicians, the faculty also had a 
stated mission to serve the people of the Commonwealth. This 
mission faculty fulfilled by offering continuing education to 
practising physicians and to other health care personnel around 
the Commonwealth. In so doing the Medical School will become 
part of a statewide health service network of public and private 
institutions. The first steps in forming such a network had been 
taken — contracts have been signed with a number of state human 
services agencies. Several such agencies had been under court 
orders to improve their health services. With the help of the 
Medical School, the agencies had been able to comply with the 
orders. Specialists from UM/Worcester visit other hospitals on 
request and help the hospital staff deal with specialty cases. 
Additional relationships had been established with Ft. Devens 
and the V.A. outpatient facility in Worcester. 

As part of the Family Practice Program, Chancellor 
Bulger continued, units were set up in various locations to serve 
the populace and to provide outpatient training for the students. 
The major consideration in siting the units was the need for 
health service, in order to ensure that teaching took place where 
there was a need. 

The Medical School faculty will in the future be ad- 
dressing some of the big problems — cancer, heart disease, re- 
habilitation and gerontology. He added that in gerontology, 
social as well as medical problems should be addressed. He then 
asked Dr. Kelly to discuss the Medical School's involvement in 
non-M.D. education. 



Dr. Kelly said the School did have a great potential in 
this area but things were in an embryonic stage. In trying to 
define the appropriate role for the School in allied health field^, 
it had been decided to supplement and complement existing programs 
with the other University of Massachusetts campuses and other in- 
stitutions in the Worcester area. An example of this was the 
joint effort with Worcester State College Nuclear Medicine Tech- 
nology program and the Medical School. The College provides the 
basic liberal arts element and some science courses and grants 
degrees; the Medical School serves as a clinical training resourc^. 
A major constraint in developing these joint efforts was the size 
and kind of patient population in the Teaching Hospital. Some 
of the service divisions of the Medical Center, such as Nursing, 
Food, Pharmaceutical and Physiotherapy, also have great potential 
for educational program development. At present, 30 nursing stu- 
dents at UM/Amherst are taking a two-year course in pathophysiology , 
The School also participated in a nurse practitioners' program of- 
fered by the Amherst campus. Another program is that which trains 
Emergency Medical Technicians. Dr. Kelly said some 380 students 
from outside the Medical School took courses last year. Finally, 
the School was working with the Worcester Consortium for Higher 



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2/18/77 



O*£o^* 



Health Affairs 
2/18/77 



Tufts Univer- 
sity Veter- 
inary School 
Proposal 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Education and anticipated other program developments in a number 
of areas. Chancellor Bulger said the Consortium could be very 
helpful overcoming the popular misperception of the doctor as the 
key to health. The doctor was only one element. Mr. Lynton said 
another possible forum that had been proposed was the health 
education program of the network of 4H clubs established by the 
Department of Cooperative Extension at Amherst. After hearing 
the presentation from the Medical Center, Trustee Gordon said he 
was disturbed that the University did not put forth more public 
relations efforts to make some of its expertise and contributions 
to health care and training in the Commonwealth better known. He 
asked that the record show that he was fed up with hearing Dr. 
Mayer discussing nutrition. 

At the Chairman's invitation, Mr. Feinblatt discussed 
student health services at Worcester. Mr. Feinblatt said health 
services were functioning well and an acting director had been 
appointed and four physicians were on call. Two nurse practition- 
ers were assigned to the unit. The $70 annual fee provides all 
outpatient services for students and their dependents. The pro- 
gram is now under study to determine if changes are necessary. 
Health insurance plans were also being considered; as part of this 
study, a questionnaire had been sent to students to elicit reactions 
and suggestions. 

The meeting then turned to item five of the agenda, 
Tufts University Veterinary School Proposal . Mr. Lynton said the 
University administration knew very little more about the proposa 
than did the public, as contact with Tufts had been minimal. 
Tufts had met only once with representatives from the land grant 
universities. The original proposal included the suggestion that 
clinical facilities of the school be dispersed across the six 
land grant institutions in the Northeast, This was based on the 
mistaken assumption that there were facilities in place on the 
campuses of the six universities, facilities which could be con- 
verted easily and cheaply. Tufts now recognized that this sugges 
tion made no sense from an economic point of view, and almost no 
sense from an educational one. The proposal now suggests major 
clinical facilities at one or two locations. 



The Tufts model was an intriguing proposal, but it would 
almost certainly be more expensive than a traditional school con- 
centrated on one campus. The position of the University was that 
the proposal needed an in-depth feasibility study but it was now 
time to begin planning. The study should address itself to a 
number of major questions — given the need for a central facility, 
does it make sense from an educational or research point of view 
to separate the basic sciences from the major clinical program; 
the second question is whether the advantage of the network of 
satellites to the participating states would outweigh the costs 
of duplicating certain facilities and faculties at each satellite 
Also, in the Tufts model, administrative control would rest with 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

more than one institution. This does not seem feasible. A final 
question to be asked would concern the true need of the school. 
There is little agreement on this. Tufts in its projections of 
need ignores the possible influence of paraprof essionals. While 
the demand for training is apparent, the need for additional prac-j 
titioners is not, Mr. Lynton concluded. 

Trustee Gordon was assured that the University's posture 
was one of cooperation in studying the matter. He then said he 
found the proposal confusing rather than intriguing. He said it 
seemed possible that the President of Tufts knew something others 
did not on keeping a medical School afloat via a veterinary school! 
Mr. Lynton said President Mayer had been very successful in en- 
listing wide-ranging support for his proposal without having to 
answer some very hard questions. Mr. Eller said that a bill now 
before the Subcommittee on Health and Education in the U.S. House 
of Representatives was in the final stages of approval. The bill 
would provide funds to establish a Northwest school of veterinary 
medicine as well as a like school for the Northeast. The impetus 
behind the bill came from the states of Washington, Oregon and 
Idaho, and the Congress with its wonted regional even-handedness 
had included the Northeastern states. The bill, which would prob- 
ably clear the committee in a few weeks, in addition to being a 
possible source of funds for the Tufts Proposal, included funds 
to compensate the University of Pennsylvania for the loss of fees 
caused by students being diverted to a new school. 

In response to Trustee Gordon's question, Professor 
Smith said that the basic science faculty at any Medical School 
could be the basic science staff for a veterinary school, with 
only minor changes in emphasis in certain fields. 

Trustee Gordon said the University would, at some point, 
have to take a position and that this position should not be a 
negative one. Mr. Lynton said the University posture from the 
beginning had been one of willing exploration of the matter. 
Chairman Robertson asked if in the course of exploration the Uni- 
versity could be drawn into the proposal financially. He said 
this possibility disturbed him as he felt available funds should 
be directed to the Medical School. Mr. Lynton said he was con- 
cerned that in discussing the pros and cons of the veterinary 
school all should realize that it was a terribly expensive propo- 
sition. While there had been no deliberate attempt to hide this 
fact, the belief had developed that the Tufts proposal could be 
implemented cheaply. 

Chairman Robertson spoke to the third item of business, 
Role and Activities of the Hospital Management Board . The HMB 
had been established by the Trustees in 1975 and was concerned 
only with the Teaching Hospital. It first met in October of that 
year. The Board is a "blue chip" one, having extremely capable 
members from across the state. To date, the HMB's primary focus 



o*c33 



Health Affairs 
2/18/77 



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Role and 
Activities of 
the Hospital 
Management 
Board 






(Ctj^± 



Health Affairs 
2/18/77 



Revision of 
Medical Center 
By-laws 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

has been in the financial area. At present, the Board is working 
on a re-definition of its purposes and on the matter of long range 
planning. Also, in April, he said, the Teaching Hospital would 
be visited by an accreditation committee of the Joint Committee 
on Accreditation of Hospitals and the HMB would be helpful in 
preparation for this visit. 

The meeting then turned to the fourth item of the agenda 
and the last order of business , Revision of Medical Center By - 
laws . Chancellor Bulger said the revisions to be recommended 



were primarily technical in nature; however, in view of the just 
mentioned April accreditation visit, which could necessitate 
further revision of the By-laws, it would be difficult to meet 
the April deadline suggested for submission of the revisions to 
the Board of Trustees. President Wood moved and it was seconded, 
and 

VOTED : To authorize the Chairman to recommend to the 
Board of Trustees that the date for submission 
of revision of the Medical Center By-laws be 
changed to June, 1977. 

There being no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, the meeting was adjourned at 3:10 p.m. 



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Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

February 23, 1977; 9:00 a.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 
Trustees Marks, Rowland and Troy; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer 
Johnson; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Dennis, Gordon and Spiller 

Other Trustees : Trustees Crain, Cronin and Robertson 

Office of the President : Mr. Cass, Executive Assistant to the 
President and Director of the Institute for Labor Affairs; Mrs. 
Hanson, Budget Director and Assistant Vice President; Mr. Hester, 
Associate Vice President for Business Services; Mr. O'Leary, 
Associate Counsel to the University 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery ; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Mr. 
DeNyse, Personnel Director 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino ; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Professor Schwartz, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor 
for Administration and Finance; Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 
Health Affairs; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Mr. Fellner, Assistant 
Controller; Professor Susan Smith, Faculty Representative 

Guests : Mr. John Wood and Mr. Arthur Parker of Standish, Ayer & 
Wood, Investment Counsel; Mrs. Shukri, Executive Office of Educa- 
tional Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 9:05 a.m. by Chair- 
man Carlson, who called first for the Report of Investment Coun- 
sel . Mr. John Wood of Standish, Ayer & Wood began by referring 
to the appraisal of the endowment portfolio which had been dis- 
tributed to the Committee and stating that the stock position of 
62.9 percent was just about on target. He referred also to the 
economic forecast which accompanied the appraisal of the portfoli 
stating that the two major factors currently affecting the econo- 
my were the weather and the change in Administration policies in 
Washington, D.C. Over all, however, he said he believed there 
would be a slight improvement in corporate earnings this year. 
He said that the stock portfolio was down a little and he recom- 
mended using the available funds to increase the stock position 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 






B&F Comm. 
2/23/77 



Extension of 
Freiburg 
(Germany) 
Rental Agree- 
ment 



Rescission of 
Obsolete 
Delegations 
of Authority 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

slightly. Responding to a question from Trustee Rowland, Mr. Wooc 
said that as business improves, he expects there will be an in- 
creasing demand for bank credit, which will in turn cause an in- 
crease in rates for short-term loans. He said there would probably 
be some spill over into the long-term market as well. This expec- 
tation of an increase in rates, he said, was the reason he recom- 
mended shortening the bond portfolio at this time. He then asked 
his associate, Mr. Arthur Parker, to speak to the specific recom- 
mendations. 

Mr. Parker said that because interest rates were going 
up, it was recommended that some of the long-term bonds which have 
increased in value recently be sold in order to reinvest in shorter- 
term securities with a higher yield. He then explained the reasons 
for each recommended purchase. Upon completion of his report, on 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute the sale and 
purchase of securities for the Endowment Fund 
Portfolio as contained in Doc. T77-075. 

Chairman Carlson asked Chancellor Bromery to introduce 
the matter of the Extension of the Freiburg Rental Agreement . 
Chancellor Bromery explained that the action requested was author- 
ization to extend an existing lease for an increased rental rate. 
Carlson said that since the increase was modest, it seemed in the 
best interests of the University to approve it. Trustee Troy 
asked how ambitious the program was at the present time. Chan- 
cellor Bromery replied that the program was substantial, primarily 
graduate, and of considerable interest. President Wood added that 
it had been established as an Atlantic Studies Center in 1966. 
There was no further discussion, and on motion made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Treasurer of the University be authorized to 
execute a two year extension of the lease for 
the University of Massachusetts Center in Freiburg, 
Germany, until June 30, 1979; provided, however, 
that the monthly rental and incidental expenses 
specified in said lease do not exceed DM 700 for 
the year commencing July 1, 1977, and DM 750 for 
the year commencing July 1, 1978. 

Chairman Carlson then asked Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director 
to explain the need for the next item, Rescinding of Obsolete 
Trustee Votes . Mrs. Hanson recalled that at the February Board 
meeting the Trustees had voted a new delegation of authority to 
the Treasurer's Office with regard to certain investment trans- 
actions and financial instruments. The proposed vote, she said, 
was simply a housekeeping action to delete prior delegations that 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

were no longer accurate or necessary, or which had been super- 
seded by the February vote. There was no discussion, and on 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
following seven votes of the Board of Trustees 
be and hereby are rescinded: 

Trustee Vote of October 19, 1963: 

VOTED : To authorize Robert H. Brand, Associate 

Treasurer of the University of Massachusetts, 
as directed by the Treasurer, or in his 
absence, to sign or endorse in the name of 
the University of Massachusetts or the Board 
of Trustees of the University of Massachu- 
setts such official documents and vouchers, 
including checks, drafts, certificates of 
deposit and withdrawal orders, as require 
the signature of the financial officer of 
the University provided that all checks, 
drafts, certificates of deposit and with- 
drawal orders in an amount of $10,000 or 
more shall require the additional signature 
of either the Treasurer or the Controller 
except fund transfers between accounts in 
the First National Bank of Amherst. 



Trustee Vote of October 7, 1971: 



VOTED : To authorize Ray E. Heiney, Jr., Assistant 
Treasurer (of the) University of Massachu- 
setts, as directed by the Treasurer or in 
his absence, to sign or endorse in the name 
of the University of Massachusetts or the 
Board of Trustees of the University of Mas- 
sachusetts such official documents, contracts | 
and vouchers, including checks, drafts, 
certificates of deposit, letters of credit, 
advances from the State Treasurer and with- 
drawal orders, as require the signature of 
the financial officer of the University pro- 
vided that all checks, drafts, certificates 
of deposit, letters of credit and withdrawal 
orders in an amount of $10,000 or more shall 
require the additional signature of either 
the Treasurer of the University, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, or the Associate Treasurer, Robert 
H. Brand, or Donald W. Cadigan, Treasurer's 
Office. 

Trustee Vote of October 22, 1966: 



"■-•' 1****""! 



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B&F Comm. 
2/23/77 






238 



B&F Comm. 
2/23/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That the following officers of the University 
of Massachusetts are each authorized, in 
their capacities as officers, to sign and 
execute singly and without any co-signature, 
any and all documents and instruments relating 
to expenditures of funds, requests for funds, 
vouchers, warrants, schedules, invoices, 
certificates and also all documents and in- 
struments of every nature and kind as all 
the aforesaid may from time to time be re- 
quired to be drawn or executed under the 
provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 75, Section 8: 

John W. Lederle, President 
Robert J. McCartney, Secretary 
Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer 
Robert H. Brand, Associate Treasurer 
L. Lawrence Taylor, Controller 
William H. Maus , Assistant Controller. 

Trustee Vote of January 16, 1963: 

VOTED : That all checks, drafts, or money orders 

representing disbursements from funds under 
the control of the Trustees payable in an 
amount of ten thousand dollars ($10,000.00) 
and over except checks representing transfers 
of funds between accounts (funds) in the 
First National Bank of Amherst shall bear 
the handwritten signature of any two of the 
following three officers: 

Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson 
Associate Treasurer, William G. Thaler 
Controller, L. Lawrence Taylor 

and provided further that the Secretary is 
instructed to transmit a certified copy of 
this vote to all banks in which the Univer- 
sity maintains funds and to the State Comp- 
troller, Treasurer and Receiver General, and 
the State Auditor. 

Trustee Vote of April 26, 1965: 

VOTED : That President John W. Lederle be authorized 
to submit proposals for Federal grants, and 
that the Treasurer of the University, Kenneth 
W. Johnson, be authorized to execute agree- 
ments under the provisions of the Higher 
Education Facilities Act of 1963 and other 
Federal statutes granting funds for construc- 
tion of buildings, facilities and equipment. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Vote of August 2, 1962: 

VOTED : That the responsibility and authority for 
the negotiation, execution and administra- 
tion of classified contracts is assigned to 
the following officers of the University: 
John W. Lederle, President; Kenneth W. John- 
son, Treasurer; John W. Ryan, Secretary. 

Trustee Vote of June 15, 1961: 

VOTED : To authorize William G. Thaler, Assistant 

Treasurer of the University of Massachusetts, 
as directed by the Treasurer, or in his 
absence, to sign or endorse in the name of 
the University of Massachusetts or the Board 
of Trustees of the University of Massachu- 
setts such official documents and vouchers, 
including checks, drafts, certificates of 
deposit and withdrawal orders, as require 
the signature of the financial officer of 
the University. 

Chairman Carlson then turned to the remaining three 
items of agenda, Mid-year Status Report on University Budget (Doc. 
T77-073), Mid-year Fund Transfers (Doc. T77-077), and Review of 
Current Hospital Requirements (Doc. T77-074) , saying that these 
items were closely related and would be dealt with in detail. 



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KS39 



B&F Comm. 
21 Thill 



Mid-year Status 
Report on Uni- 
versity Budget 
(Doc. T77-073) 



He called first on President Wood, who commented on the 
fund transfer patterns. He said that the mid-year reviews reflected 
the different characteristics and strategies of the campuses - 
UM/Amherst attempting to maintain flexibility in a steady state, 
UM/Bostonand UM/Worcester still experiencing growth. He said 
one of the items addressed by the mid-year reviews was the need 
for a deficiency request for the UM/Worcester Medical Center. 
He said there were also minor transfers in the President's Office 
and the Common Services, but that these were customary. 

Chairman Carlson then asked Chancellor Bromery to com- 
ment on the status of the budget for UM/Amherst. Chancellor 
Bromery explained that on the Amherst Campus at the time of the 
mid-year review, the administration looks again at the various 
department budgets to determine whether there should be any program 
changes or transfers at that level. He said the major transfer 
at the campus was the transfer of money from the 01 account to 
the 03 account, reflecting the uncertainty of the funding picture 
for FY 1978. He said that by hiring temporary personnel, the cam- 
pus will be in a better position to deal with cost-of-living ad- 
justments should the Governor insist on level funding. However, 
he said, if the University pays cost-of-living adjustments similar 
to those granted to the Alliance and if the Governor succeeds in 



UM/Amherst — 
Fund Transfers 



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m:40 



B&F Comm. 
2/23/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

his insistence on level funding, the impact on the Amherst budget 
would be $4 million; that is, the campus would suffer a cut in FY 
1978. He said that in the past the University had paid cost-of- 
living adjustments to both employees whose positions were state 
funded and those whose positions were fee-funded. The fee-funded 
increases next year, he said, would have to be reflected in higher 
fees. To increase fees in mid-year, however, he said, would put 
a hardship on students on scholarships and parents who had budgeted 
expenses on a yearly basis. 



Trustee Marks asked if the campus was encountering 
difficulty in hiring on 03 funds rather than on 01. Chancellor 
Bromery replied that, of course, different kinds of people were 
hired and that in time it would affect the quality of the academic 
programs. He said that level funding would create a very real 
problem. He added that if the University does not have a budget 
until July, it is impossible to hire personnel for the first 
semester. He said that the inflation factor, step increases 
and high energy costs due to the severe winter, added to the cost- 
of-living adjustments, would endanger the quality of education anc 
possibly necessitate a cutback in enrollment. He said that it is 
necessary to have a freshman class to maintain a desirable student 
mix. A cutback in enrollment would, therefore, affect the trans- 
fer compact. Trustee Troy questioned the projected increase in 
students in FY 1978, when it is not expected that funds will be 
available. Chancellor Bromery replied that it is necessary to 
maintain a stable enrollment of underclassmen in order not to 
adversely affect the residence hall system. He said that the 
campus presently has 220 vacant faculty positions, but that lay- 
offs might still be necessary, although they would occur in fac- 
ulty positions as a last resort. He said that maintenance of the 
campus would suffer when funds were scarce. 

Chairman Carlson, referring to Table 3 in the UM/ 
Amherst report, asked how it happened that the campus had realizec 
a savings in energy. Chancellor Bromery replied that the budget 
had been projected on the assumption of opening the Tillson Power 
Plant, which has not been activated, and this savings resulted 
from the continued use of the old power plant, which burns coal. 
However, he said, the old power plant is in violation of the 
clean-air laws. 



Replying to a query from Trustee Troy, Mrs. Hanson ex- 
plained that $32 million had been set aside by the Commonwealth 
to cover the estimated cost-of-living adjustments resulting from 
the Alliance settlement, and that the University would get its 
share from this fund. The bonus, however, would have to be borne 
by the University. Trustee Marks asked if the University would 
pay the cost-of-living adjustments from its operating budget and 
then seek reimbursement from the State. Mrs. Hanson said that 
this could be done, but that it presented a problem should the 
money not be released later by the State. Secretary of Educational 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Affairs Parks, she said, had said at the previous Board meeting 
that there would not be a problem in getting the money; but the 
Board vote had been cautious and had contained the proviso in its 
votes ratifying the classified employees contracts that the ad- 
justments would be paid upon the release of the money to the Uni- 
versity. So far, she said, the Commission on Administration and 
Finance had not indicated a process for the transfer of the money 

Discussion next turned to the Boston Campus and Chan- 
cellor Golino said problems were equally serious at UM/Boston. 
Level funding would put the Boston Campus in a difficult if not 
impossible situation. Requests for transfers, he said, had been 
held to a minimum. A transfer of money to the 01 account would 
be necessary to cover the cost-of-living adjustments. There are 
presently, he said, 144 vacant positions. He said UM/Boston has 
also had to resort to the use of part-time faculty to stretch 
resources. If the campus must absorb next year the cost-of-living 
increases in addition to inflation, the cost to the campus would 
be in the neighborhood of $1.5 million. He said the campus would 
then have to consider cutting back on enrollments and programs. 

Trustee Troy asked what this would do to the proposed 
new program for Health Services Delivery in the College of Profes- 
sional Studies. Chancellor Golino said that this proposed small 
program would require the addition of one new position in the 
fall and possibly two or three additional positions at a later 
date. However, he said, with the present resource picture, the 
College may not be able to go forward with the program in FY 1978 
Trustee Troy said he understood the extended-day program was work- 
ing well, but wondered how many additional students could be en- 
rolled without additional buildings. Chancellor Golino replied 
that currently there were 750 students in the extended-day pro- 
gram, and that more could be accommodated. However, he said, 
9000 was the estimated maximum enrollment. He said this was as- 
suming that College III would remain at 100 Arlington Street. 



Chairman Carlson asked Mr. Cass how soon he thought the 
University might know what its budget would be for FY 1978. Mr. 
Cass said that there are a number of problems which the Legislature 
must face and resolve before the budget can be enacted. The leg- 
islature will need accurate revenue figures and, therefore, he 
expected it would be some time yet before the budget would be 
forthcoming. 

Professor Schwartz questioned the tutorial budget for 
College IV. Provost Steamer explained that much more faculty 
time was involved in the tutorial services for the College of 
Public and Community Service than was the case in the College of 
Liberal Arts and that this was the reason for the seeming dis- 
crepancy. Chancellor Golino said that the money set aside for 
equity adjustments had had to be reallocated to cover the cost-of- 
living and bonus payments authorized by the Commonwealth. He said 



*J& 



B&F Comm. 
2/23/77 



UM/Boston — 
Fund Transfers 



-7- 



3242 



B&F Comm. 
2/23/77 



President' s 
Office- 
Fund Transfers 



Institute for 
Governmental 
Services — 
Fund Transfers 



Common 
Services — 
Fund Transfers 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the equity adjustments would be implemented as soon as money was 
available. 

At the request of Chairman Carlson, Mrs. Hanson explained 
the President's Office transfers. Mrs. Hanson reported that the 
budget for the President's Office this year had been smaller than 
that for the previous seven-month period, and the shortfall in 
State funding in the 02 salary account would have to be made up 
from Trust funds. She said that the transfers requested were 
minor and were the result of increased costs for xeroxing, paper 
supplies, telephone charges, maintenance and fuel. Since Presi- 
dent's Office personnel were traveling less, she said, they were 
telephoning more. 

Responding to a question from Trustee Cronin, President 
Wood said that the Trustee Council is now called the President's 
Advisory Council. It is a group of civic and community leaders, 
established in 1973, in an effort to educate the private sector 
about the University. At that time, the President said, there 
was a great lack of knowledge about the University's activities. 
Trustee Spiller was the first chairman of the group of from 30 to 
40 members which meets three or four times a year to discuss 
ways in which the University can serve the community more effective 
ly. They have dealt in the past with such diverse matters as the 
Columbia Point development and graduate education, and are now 
considering the service capabilities of the University. They serv 
without pay. 



Chairman Carlson next asked Mrs. Hanson to review the 
transfers requested by the Institute for Governmental Services. 
Mrs. Hanson explained the valuable public service work provided 
by the Institute, such as its courses in Municipal Management, its; 
various workshops and publications, and said that the major trans- 
fers were requested in conjunction with its current program to 
evaluate children's services in the state for the House Ways and 
Means Committee. 

Chairman Carlson then asked Mr. Hester to speak to the 
transfers requested for the Common Services portion of the budget 
Mr. Hester said that the transfer from the 01 to the 02 account 
reflected a commitment by the President to return some positions 
to the Amherst campus. Money was transferred to the 03 account 
to allow part-time work by students to handle the overload on the 
computer during the weekends. A larger computer had been leased 
to handle the increased activity in this area, which accounted 
for the increase in maintenance requested in the 12 account. He 
said, also, that the state did not fully fund the Library BCL 
project whereby the University Library provides computerized 
functions for the combined state higher education libraries. 
Chairman Carlson said these transfers would appear as part of the 
campus transfer requests. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Carlson said that the Committee would now turn 
to what the French called the "piece of resistance." He said he 
had deliberately skipped the Medical Center in the foregoing dis- 
cussions of fund transfers because he believes in the case of the 
Medical Center these should be taken up along with the matter of 
the deficiency budget request for FY 1977 for the Hospital and 
the impact of these matters on the budget request for FY 1978. 
He said these factors were all related to the very complex issue 
of the Teaching Hospital. The problems he said he felt resulted 
from three factors: 1) the well-intentioned attempt by the UM/ 
Worcester administration to cooperate with the need for economies 
in the University budget as a whole at a time when it was just 
starting up, which helped on a short term basis, but which could 
lead to insurmountable difficulties over the long run; 2) the 
failure to recognize that one cannot look at budgets for a new 
institution of the complexity of the Medical Center on a year-to- 
year basis simply because that is the way the agencies of the 
Commonwealth are required to do their budgeting; it is necessary 
to look at the needs of the campus on a multi-year basis in order 
to understand any one year's figures; and 3) a failure to under- 
stand the importance of charges to the public for hospital serv- 
ices in determining the true net cost of the hospital. Chairman 
Carlson said he felt it was time now to meet all of these problems 
head on simply because not to do so would result in the gradual 
withering away of the successful programs now underway, with the 
possible ultimate closing first, of the hospital and later on, of 
the Medical School itself. 

Chairman Carlson called attention to the two substantia!, 
documents which had been distributed to the Committee, which he 
said he thought presented a responsible, comprehensive and well- 
reasoned argument for the 50 percent increase requested in the FY 
1978 budget for the Teaching Hospital. He said the fault, he be- 
lieved, was in not facing this problem at an earlier date. He 
faulted himself, the President and the campus for looking at the 
short term expediency rather than the long term needs. He said 
there must be a better understanding of the concept of publicly 
supported medical education. The basic issue is the need to face 
the hard realities of the high cost of medical education. He said 
he felt it was no longer sufficient to submit a budget that the 
Medical Center could live with for one year. Medical education, 
he said, is expensive and this must be recognized, but under 
careful administration, the net cost to the public can be kept 
within reasonable bounds. He said he had spent a day and a half 
on campus with personnel from the campus and from the President's 
Office, trying prodigiously to find some way to reduce this re- 
quest. They could not do so. 

President Wood said that in addition to the work of 
University of Massachusetts personnel, he had invited Dr. Edward 
Andrews of the Portland Medical Center, former President of the 
University of Vermont and former Dean of the Medical School there. 



-9- 



B&F Coram. 
2/23/77 



UM/ Worcester — 
Medical Center- 
Review of 
Current 
Hospital Re- 
quirements 
(Doc. T77-074) 






5244 



B&F Comm. 
2/23/77 



FY 1977 Fund 
Transfers 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

along with his financial associate down that weekend for consulta- 
tion. Both concur with the Chancellor's evaluation of the situa- 
tion. In addition, Dr. John Bowers of the Macy Foundation visitec 
Worcester and has written a helpful and supportive letter. 

Chairman Carlson then introduced members of the UM/ 
Worcester campus who were on hand to answer questions from the 
Committee. 

Chancellor Bulger said he did not feel guilty for not 
taking action sooner because, he said, the Teaching Hospital had 
not been in operation long enough by last summer or fall to have 
had adequate data on experience to make the kind of evaluation 
it is now able to do, which has led to the revised request. Up tc 
now, projections had to be based upon analogous experience at other 
new hospitals. For example, the normal pattern for a new hospital 
is a low patient census at the outset. However, he said the 
Hospital experience on patient census has differed in this first 
year from conventional expectations; it has in fact had more busi- 
ness than it is able to handle. The advantage UM/Worcester has 
in starting a new hospital at this time is that it can benefit 
from the mistakes made by the established Medical Schools with 
teaching hospitals. He said he realizes the importance, for in- 
stance, of separating the educational costs from the hospital 
costs. Most developed Medical Centers are now going through the 
difficulties of separating these two kinds of costs, burdened by 
the earlier mixing of such costs. UM/Worcester , starting fresh, 
has done a great deal in sifting out the Medical School costs 
from the hospital, and only those educational costs for non- 
physician medical personnel, such as pharmacists, remain in the 
hospital budget. 



Trustee Carlson said he had asked Mrs. Hanson to prepare 
some projection charts which he felt would help to explain the 
situation. It is not going to be easy, he said, to secure the 
funding that is necessary in 1977 and 1978 and it is important 
to understand the inter-relationship of the deficiency and the 
revision of the FY 1978 budget and to know what is being proposed 
and why. 

He started with FY 1977. He said the proposed transfers; 
in the personnel accounts in the Medical School budget were the 
result of the delay in recruitment of some clinical faculty and 
increased costs in 03, such as for snow removal and police person- 
nel. In the Hospital budget, he said the slight shortfall in the 
gross in-patient revenue resulting from the slow opening of beds 
was offset by the revision downward in bad debts. Mr. Fellner 
explained that about 90 percent of the in-patient charges were 
substantially covered by third-party payers, lessening the expo- 
sure for bad debts. 

Chairman Carlson, by the use of slides, went over the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



O 



B&F Comm. 
2/23/77 



various transfers and the deficiency request in detail. The de- FY 1977 

ficiency request includes $159,000 for the opening of twenty Deficiency 

additional beds and $635,000 for unanticipated or underestimated Request 
expenses. 

Chairman Carlson then turned to the request for FY 19 78 J Revised FY 1978 



I 



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He said it was important to understand the assumptions on which 
this revised request was based — 1) that from a strictly educa- 
tional point of view, the Teaching Hospital is an integral and 
fundamental component in the educational activities of the Medical 
School because clinical training is heavily dependent on the 
breadth of specialties in the care delivered at the Hospital; 2) 
the quality of the teaching in the Hospital is dependent on the 
opening of at least 70 new beds in FY 1978; 3) costs per patient 
day can be cut proportionately as patient beds are increased. 
He said that the revised FY 1978 budget of $18,780,500 over the 
original budget of $12,112,500 anticipated a reduction in net 
cost resulting from the opening of new beds. He said it was im- 
portant to note that the original budget had indicated that it 
would support 130 beds. Experience of the last several months 
at the Hospital indicates clearly that this amount could only 
support a total of 85 beds. Chairman Carlson said that another 
important fact to note was the dual mission of the Medical Center 
a) to produce well-trained physicians and other health profession- 
als for the Commonwealth and b) to improve the quality and acces- 
sibility of health care services throughout the state. He said 
it is impossible to have an effective medical school without 
providing training in a broad range of medical specialties. He 
pointed out that growth in bed capacity is necessary in order for 
the Hospital to become self-supporting. It cannot be cost effec- 
tive at the present level. He said it is important also to correct 
the widely held misunderstanding that rates mean cost. The Com- 
monwealth, he said, has been subsidizing not only the relatively 
small number of self-paying patients but also the third-party 
payers. He said that the suggestion that it is important not to 
increase rates in order to keep health care costs down is not a 
viable argument if the Hospital is to continue its existence. 
He said that it must be assumed that the Hospital will always be 
a net cost to the State, but it is anticipated that the net cost 
on an accrual basis will peak in FY 1978 and thereafter will 
decline. On a cash basis the peak will come in FY 1979. 

With regard to the implications of level funding, Mr. 
Carlson said that failure to expand the Hospital would lead to a 
decrease in the program and the eventual withering of the Medical 
School. He said another critical factor is that there are minimun 
standards which must be met by the Hospital for the number of 
beds in relation to the number of clinical (third and fourth year^ 
students in the Medical School. Although no projections have 
been made for an increase in the original enrollment figures for 
the Medical School, it is now at the point where the number of 
students in their clinical years requires that additional beds be 



Maintenance 
Budget Request 



-11- 



"5246 



B&F Comm. 
2/23/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

provided in order for them to receive proper instruction. 

Chairman Carlson indicated by use of a chart that al- 
though the original plans for enrollment had not changed, the 
opening of beds had been curtailed so that the ratio of beds to 
students did not catch up to the original plan until 1981. He 
said it is an established ratio that there need be four patient 
beds for each student. He then called attention to the increasing 
percentage in the acuity of illness of patients admitted to the 
Hospital. From August to January the percentage had jumped from 
35 to 60. He said that although this meant that the Hospital was 
successful in both providing the educational experiences needed 
by students and service to the state, it had serious budgetary 
implications . 

Chairman Carlson said another important point to keep 
in mind was that of the projected increase in expenditures for FY 
1978 over FY 1977, only $3.6 million of this increase was due to 
program increases. The major increases, he said, were in salaried 
and medical supplies. 

He said that since the Hospital could be largely self- 
supporting in time, he felt it would be wise at some point to un- 
couple the Hospital budget from the rest of the University budget 
The focus should be only on the difference between revenue and 
expenditure and not on the full budget amount. He showed how, 
as time goes on, although the expenditures for the Hospital would 
continue to rise, the income would rise at a greater rate, thus 
narrowing the deficit and resulting in a decreasing cost to the 
taxpayers. Turning next to a comparison of sources of income of 
University-owned Teaching hospitals which are awarded state appro- 
priations, Chairman Carlson said that the FY 1978 Hospital budget 
represents an amount of state support which is less than the 
national average. He added that the amount of support required 
from the state in FY 1980 would represent only 6 percent of the 
total income from all sources. Chairman Carlson said this con- 
cluded his presentation and asked if there were any questions. 

President Wood thanked Chairman Carlson for the tremen- 
dous effort that went into preparation for this visual presenta- 
tion. He then gave a brief summary for the benefit of the newer 
Trustees of the history of the Medical Center. He said that the 
University had been concerned originally about the possible low 
occupancy rates of the Hospital, based on the experiences of other 
beginning teaching hospitals. However, he said two factors had 
been favorable to UM/Worcester : 1) the desire of the physicians 
in the area for a teaching hospital, and 2) the filling of health 
care delivery needs which had heretofore gone unattended because 
of the lack of a facility in the area to provide the required 
services. He said that he agreed with Trustee Carlson that the 
time has come to consider the question as to whether the Univer- 
sity should move to make the Teaching Hospital a separate Trust 



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5247 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Fund operation. He said he thought it was unfair to the other 
two campuses to continue to carry the burden of the cost of the 
Hospital. He said that this problem would be seriously studied 
in the coming months . 

Chancellor Bulger briefed the Committee on the serious 
problem faced by the Medical Center faculty. He said costs had 
been cut to the bone and they have had to consider whether to keep 
cutting or to send patients away in order to keep the quality of 
care at a high level. Chancellor Bulger said he and Dr. Caper 
made the decision to take care of fewer people in order not to 
shortchange patients, and also in relation to teaching and the 
educational mission of the Medical School, this decision provides 
an example to the students for standards and quality of delivery 
of services. 

Trustee Robertson, Chairman of the Committee on Health 
Affairs and Vice Chairman of the Hospital Management Board, said 
he would like to speak in those capacities as well as a Trustee 
and citizen and taxpayer of the Commonwealth. He said he felt 
it was absolutely essential that additional beds in the Teaching 
Hospital be opened as quickly as possible to meet the needs that 
are there: 1) the education of the medical students, 2) the 
performance of services to the Commonwealth, and 3) to be economi- 
cally efficient. On the first point, he said, in order to give 
the medical students a proper education it is necessary that the 
Hospital services be expanded. On the second point, he said that 
the Medical Center is already providing services at both Monson 
and Belchertown state hospitals. On the third point, he said, 
the Hospital Management Board, which is composed of people with 
expertise in the field from all over the state and who have no 
vested interest in the Hospital, cannot see how to justify a 
limited operation at high cost when an expanded facility would 
reduce the cost and there is a need for the service. Holding 
back the expansion of the Hospital, he said, is increasing the 
cost to the taxpayers. 

Trustee Marks asked how important the ratio of four beds 
per student was. Chancellor Bulger said that this is a matter of 
highest priority. For the students to get the necessary experience, 
he said, it is not only the number of beds which is important, 
but the quality of care provided. He said in order to get a suf- 
ficient variety of experiences, it is necessary for the students 
to get these experiences at other hospitals. This makes it more 
difficult to control the quality of the experience. The accredita- 
tion of the Medical School rises and falls, he said, with the 
quality of relationships with the affiliated hospitals in which 
the students are training. If a medical school has a teaching 
hospital, it has greater leverage to upgrade this quality of 
clinical teaching in the affiliated hospitals by building a state 
network of hospitals. UM/Worcester will need 625 effective teach- 
ing beds to meet the present planned enrollment. At that point, 



B&F Comm. 
2/23/77 



-13- 



o 



B&F Comm. 
2/23/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the University would have the clinical resources to permit con- 
sideration of expanding the medical class. The basic science 
portion of the education of medical students can be met under 
present resources, he said, but the provision of clinical educa- 
tion at this time presents a major problem. He explained that 
the graduates of the Medical School up to now (16 graduates in 
1974, 22 in 1975, 26 in 1976 and 39 in 1977) were in the top 
ten percent on the Board exams nationally of those who 
graduated. As the numbers in the clinical classes increase to 
100 in each class, it will become more difficult to provide high 
quality clinical experience. At issue is the accreditation of the 
Medical School and at the moment it is a tight squeeze. Trustee 
Marks expressed his belief that it would be difficult to get the 
Legislature to focus on the economic problem and he felt there 
was an unwillingness by both the Legislature and the Governor to 
recognize the high cost of medical education. He said the Medical 
Center has become the "lightening rod" when the University budget 
is being considered by the Legislature or the Executive and it 
tends to have an adverse effect on the Boston and Amherst budget 
requests. For that reason, he said, he was interested in the 
President's comment about the uncoupling of the Hospital budget 
from the rest of the University. 



Trustee Crain said that if the Board supports the in- 
crease of the Hospital budget, the Board will be accountable for 
the case to be made. He said the data presented must be carefully 
reconciled and suggested the need for clarity in some of the 
material presented. He said he thought it important to break out 
from the cash figure what is actually cash in hand and what is re- 
ceivable. He said he did not understand one statistic, the average 
length of hospital stay. He asked why if acute care is on the in- 
crease, the average length of stay in the revised FY 1977 budget 
is less than that of the original FY 1977 budget. Mr. Fellner 
said the figure used in the original budget was a national averag^ 
of new teaching hospitals opened over the last few years. He 
said the patient-day figure was an average of the number of patieb-ts 
multiplied by the length of stay in the hospital, so that as one 
component went up, the other went down. He and Dr. Caper both 
agreed that the acuity of the illness had little effect on the 
patient-day figure, since the high cost services came usually in 
the early part of the hospital stay and the latter part was the 
convalescent stage. Chairman Carlson said it is difficult to 
project expenses on such limited experience, but until the expe- 
rience is there, there is no other way to predict than to make 
modest conjectures based on experience elsewhere. 

Dr. Caper cautioned that one more factor should be kept 
in mind, and that was that the revenue figures were predicated 
on rate increases. He said the Carter administration had just 
put forth a proposal to limit the increases in hospital costs to 
8 percent a year. He said that although he did not believe the 
proposal would pass this year, it was possible that in the future 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the University Hospital might be frozen into a rate structure 
which was disadvantageous to the Commonwealth and that, too, 
should be considered. 

Trustee Troy asked how the Legislature could be shown 
that expansion of the Hospital would, indeed, cut down the amount 
of subsidy required from the State. President Wood said it would 
take special effort on the part of the University to explain this 
matter thoroughly. 

Professor Susan Smith, speaking for the faculty at the 
Medical School, said that the FY 1978 budget approved for the 
Medical School contained an increase of $2.5 million. She said 
it would be difficult to hire new faculty for the Medical School, 
or to keep some of the present faculty, if the capacity of the 
Hospital did not also expand; and, she said, as the Hospital ex- 
pands, it is also necessary to expand the clinical faculty. It 
would be a disaster if the Medical School was forced to have leve!. 
funding. She said morale is low among clinical faculty. She gav 
some examples of reasons for this condition. Faculty were recrui 
ed to the School, attracted by the opportunities to develop pro- 
grams, but are now told the resources do not permit them to do so 
They cannot admit patients due to the lack of beds. She said 
that the Medical School is lacking many specialty areas required 
in order to provide for educational needs. Clinical faculty must 
"dicker" for bed space. She said many clinicians have outpatients 
who when they need inpatient care can't gain admission to the Uni- 
versity Hospital. The Medical School has not been able to buy 
books for the library in two years. The most distressing factor, 
however, she said, is that because of the limited number of beds 
in the University Hospital, many of the third and fourth year 
students do not get an opportunity to interact with the excellent 
clinical faculty of the Medical Center. Students graduate from 
the Medical School who have not been able to benefit from adequate 
contact with the excellent clinical faculty and the services pro- 
vided in the Teaching Hospital. 

Chairman Carlson said that the question of the separate 
Hospital Trust Fund must be looked at very closely, and it should 
be understood that budgeting for the Hospital must be done on a 
multi-year basis and not year by year. Mr. Carlson said that ever 
though three-year funding could not be obtained, it was neverthe- 
less necessary to show the Legislature what the multi-year plans 
are. He then concluded discussion and asked for votes on the 
various issues. 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve the 
subsidiary account transfers as detailed in Doc. 
T77-077. 

It was further 



-15- 



B&F Comm. 
2/23/77 



Fund Transfers 
(Doc. T77-077) 



j250 



""I"- 



B&F Comm. 
2/23/77 



VOTED 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the submission of a FY77 deficiency budget re- 
quest for the University Hospital (7411-1006) 
in the amount of $794,000, distributed among 
the subsidiary accounts as follows: 



I 



01 


$283,000 


07 


311,000 


08 


200,000 



and also 

VOTED 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve the 
revised FY78 Maintenance Budget Request for the 
University Hospital (7411-1006) as set forth in 
Doc. T77-074. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:07 p.m. 



_ 2^ 

Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keitn Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 




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ATTENDANCE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON LONG-RANGE PLANNING 

February 23, 1977; 1:00 p.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Rowland; President Wood; 



Trustees Breyer , Carlson, Clark, Marks; Secretary Hardy; Miss 
Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustee Anrig 



Other Trustees: Trustees Crain and Cronin 



Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cooley, 
Associate Vice President for Analytical Studies; Mrs. Weiner, 
Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Schwartz, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

The meeting was called to order at 1:12 p.m. Chairman 
Rowland welcomed Trustee Marks to the Committee. She said the 
policy statement of the Advisory Council on the Fine Arts, at 
hand, had been approved by the Board in October of 1976. This 
approval capped a two and a half year effort of the Advisory Coun- 
cil. Due to some immediate pressing matters that faced the Budget 
and Finance and Executive Committees, the meeting today of the 
Committee on Long-Range Planning would be limited by time, she 
said, since the next meeting will begin at three o'clock. She 
regretted these constraints very much, she said, as she felt the 
Committee functioned best when discussion could be full and open- 
ended. Nevertheless, she said she would like to use the time 
available to talk about the campus responses to the Report of the 
Advisory Council on the Fine Arts and then, very briefly, to re- 
view the next steps in the master planning process. 

She noted that all Committee Members had received copies 
of memoranda from several department heads, the provosts, and 
Chancellors responding to some of the recommendations of the Ad- 
visory Council. She found these responses very disappointing, 
and she asked leave to speak briefly to the reasons for her dis- 
appointment, after which she would open the meeting to general 
comment and discussion. 



J*C*JjL 



"5?* 



Campus Re- 
sponses to the 
Report of the 
Advisory 
Council on the 
Fine Arts 



"5252 

L-RP Comm. 
2/23/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

As most of the Committee members know, she said, it had 
been more than three years since the Board voted to establish the 
Fine Arts Council, and six months since the Council's report was 
completed. She said she didn't find it unreasonable to hope that 
some action would be visible in the FY 1978 Budget, or ready for 
the fall semester of 1977. As she read the responses, action 
seemed still to be over the horizon. 

She expressed her disppointment as well by the lack of 
response to the Report's emphasis on the role of fine arts in the 
service of liberal arts education as opposed to the development 
of specialized programs. 

The responses did not really address the questions of 
cost and resources raised by Trustee Carlson. As she recalled, 
the campuses offered to provide rather specific information on 
present and projected demand for studio courses for non-majors, 
and to estimate the faculty and space resources that the Report's 
recommendations would require. She did not see that information 
here. 

Finally, she did not see the Boston Campus responding 
to the Report's comments on the use of the city's fine arts re- 
sources, nor was she satisfied that Amherst's comments on the 
Fine Arts Center met the Trustees' request for a report on "the 
steps necessary to establish the Fine Arts Center as a major re- 
source serving both the University community and the Commonwealth. 

She said she would be glad to hear the reactions of 
other members of the Committee, and then would ask Vice President 
Lynton to talk briefly about the academic five-year plans, which 
came into the President's Office just last week, and their impli- 
cations for the continued development of the fine arts. 

Trustee Carlson said he shared the Chairman's disap- 
pointment with the responses received. He said he appreciated 
the difficulties facing the campuses in devising general plans 
and including therein special proposals such as those put forward 
by the Advisory Council. Despite the severe budgetary constraints 
he said the campuses should have been able to at least give pro- 
jected costs of the various proposals. He said the responses 
showed that implementing the Advisory Council's recommendations 
would entail taking funds from other areas, and this was always 
a tough decision to make. However, if the Committee on Long- 
Range Planning is to have any impact on academic planning, the 
Committee needs to have information from the campuses when it 
asks for it. Trustee Marks said he was somewhat familiar with 
the situation, having served the past three years as the chair- 
person of the UM/Amherst Fine Arts Gallery Advisory Committee. 
It was his opinion that some of the specifics that the Committee 
wanted could not be formulated until the overall mission of the 
Fine Arts Center at UM/Amherst and the three major functions 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

within it had been defined. To his mind, there had been much 
rhetoric and little hard thinking. For example, if the Gallery 
of the Center was to serve functions other than those directly 
related to the campus and the immediate surrounding communities 
and become a part of the fine arts resources serving the State, 
there had been no evidence of a firm decision to work towards 
this goal. There had been much talk of what could be done but 
very little talk of what should be done. He said there was an 
existing network of institutions that would be willing to cooper- 
ate in such a venture. There was a danger that the Gallery could 
come to be seen as a local phenomenon and not a serious enterprise 
If the momentum of interest in the Gallery as a resource beyond 
the campus should subside, it would take years to regain it. He 
urged that the mission be defined as quickly as possible. 

Chairman Rowland said the Council from its inception 
had believed that some reallocation of resources would be neces- 
sary if any of its recommendations were to be implemented. These 
reallocations would require setting up a process for determining 
priorities. She said she did not see in the campus reports clear 
responses to the priorities voted by the Board. Chairman Rowland I 
then called upon Mr. Lynton who said there were three major issues 
which would have to be dealt with in the near future. First, the 
potential and the limitations of the Fine Arts Center had to be 
thoroughly explored and the missions had to be clarified. He 
said to implement the recommendation that the Center have a state- 
wide impact was one that required expertise of a kind that few 
people at the University possessed. The second major issue con- 
cerned a number of recommendations about resources which will re- 
quire further assessment and effort; for example, the Council's 
recommendation that UM/Boston utilize the resources of the city's 
art institutes. The third issue had to do with the fine arts 
programs in the context of the five-year plans and such planning, 
he said, required making decisions and choices, and this has yet 
to be done. However, it was of the highest priority in the Pres- 
ident's Office and on the campuses. 

Trustee Marks said the Committee should be aware that 
a minor matter could sometimes have a major impact. As an exam- 
ple he cited some minor problems at the Gallery - a leak, which 
was causing humidity, and security. No significant collections 
would be loaned to the Gallery until these minor problems were 
corrected. Mr. Lynton said progress had been made to correct 
these problems within the last two months. 

Chancellor Bromery said he felt the Committee members 
were being overly kind in their comments about the UM/Amherst 
report. He said his reaction and that of the Provost bordered on 
the violent. He said the report reflected the conflicting inter- 
ests of those faculty members housed in the Arts Center. Since 
receiving the report, he and the Provost had decided to establish 
an administrative task force to sort out these conflicting inter- 



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2/23/77 



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L-RP Comm. 
2/23/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ests and then address the mandates of the Fine Arts Council Report 
He said a more comprehensive report would be made by the task 
force and would be sent to the Committee. 



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Mr. Puryear asked leave to make a plea for the "sanctit} 
of the planning process. He said he found it disturbing to look 
at the fine arts programs isolated from the rest of the campus anc 
that it was a mistake to make resource projections for the fine 
arts outside the context of the whole university. For this reasor 
and a variety of others, the campus response had not supplied firm 
projections. However, the report did speak to the general direc- 
tions the campus wished to undertake. He noted that the fine art£ 
was only one of many competing claimants on resources. 

Chairman Rowland said she understood his concern about 
the planning context, but although he was new to the University, 
he could appreciate the Trustees' concern and waning patience 
given the fact that planning for the Fine Arts Center began ten 
years ago and the Fine Arts Council was established by the Long- 
Range Planning Committee more than two years ago as one of the 
very earliest actions of this Committee. Trustee Carlson said he 
believed the campuses could have supplied detailed cost projectior 
and the Committee, in studying them, would realize that they were 
subject to revision. Mr. Puryear said cost factors were being 
developed. 

President Wood said he agreed with Trustee Marks that 
the definition of mission was critical. He said the further issue: 
to be assessed was the kind and capacity of student body the Uni- 
versity has in the performing and fine arts. 

Chancellor Golino said the situation on the Boston cam- 
pus was much different from Amherst. The Council Report had been 
a welcome document as it had been the first study of the role of 
the fine arts on the UM/Boston campus made by a committee which 
included outsiders. He said he had for some time considered fine 
arts instruction to be an important part of university life. 
However, when he assumed the Chancellorship, the amount of re- 
sources devoted to the fine arts at that time indicated that the 
role of the fine arts was seen as an ancillary one. The resources 
available were further diluted by being split between two col- 
leges, thus a concentrated effort to improve the situation was not 
feasible. Even with the subsequent merger of the two colleges, 
the resources currently available were still inadequate. 

Lack of physical facilities, he continued, is a major 
problem. The building originally planned for the arts had not 
been built and the Library, built for a larger campus than is 
currently fiscally possible, is being used to supplement other 
space for the arts. He said the cost figures necessary to follow 
the Council's recommendation were available and could be supplied. 
He agreed that priorities had to be established but, given the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

budgetary situation, it was difficult to determine where the fundi; 
necessary to implement the priorities would come from. However, 
he added, each academic department at UM/Boston was examining its 
needs to determine if cost savings could be achieved. 

Chancellor Golino, continuing his account, said there 
was now a small gallery on campus which was actively used and the 
Art Department had established relationships with institutions in 
Boston. Admittedly, there was a great deal yet to be done but a 
beginning had been made. Mr. Steamer said UM/Boston had a special, 
problem as regards reallocations for the fine arts. Since the 
merger of the two colleges, decisions as to reallocations between 
the colleges would have to be made before decisions on reallocating 
funds within the colleges could be made. 



Mr. Lynton said that the need to know the costs of 
various developments and proposals was important but the planning 
process also had to include something that had not been included 
in the past - the making of difficult choices. For example, if 
there was no possibility for additional funds for the College of 
Liberal Arts at UM/Boston, the Campus would have to decide if 
there were programs at the College of less importance than the 
fine arts. If this was so, then resources would have to be shift-' 
ed. If there were no programs of lesser importance, then the 
College would have to report that there was nothing that could 
be done. UM/Amherst would have to do the same thing. The process; 
of setting priorities within the department and then among depart- 
ments precedes the overall allocation of resources and all divi- 
sions of the University must address this matter as soon as pos- 
sible. 

Trustee Carlson said that knowing the cost of the Coun- 
cil's recommendations would surely help in deciding what overall 
priority the fine arts should receive. He had not come to any 
conclusion as to the priority of the fine arts on either campus. 
Chairman Rowland reminded the Committee that the Board, at its 
October meeting, had reaffirmed its commitment to the importance 
of the fine arts in the educational programs of the University. 
The campuses had reported there was great demand for such programs* 
and they were working toward shifting funds to the fine arts. 

Trustee Marks asked for information about the UM/Amherst. 
arts extension courses. Mr. Puryear said that these programs 
were currently under study. He said that there are two ways in 
which the extension courses can be provided - one, to bring people 
from outside the University to the campuses, and the other, to 
use off-campus facilities for student programs. 

Professor Schwartz said the Board should realize that 
financial constraints were not the only difficult components in 
long-range planning at UM/Boston at the present time. The recent 
merger of two colleges into a single college that enrolled 85 per-- 



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L-RP Comm. 
2/23/77 



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L-RP Comm. 
2/23/77 



Initiation of 
University 
Master Plan- 
ning 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

cent of the students at UM/Boston meant the departments had to 
first determine their immediate day-to-day relationships in the 
new setting. Until this was done, planning would necessarily 
have a lesser priority. Another factor was that the college was 
administered by an acting dean, and a search for a new dean was 
now being undertaken. The cautions included in the long-range 
academic plan as to the tenuous nature of the plan reflected the 
uncertain circumstances in which the campus found itself. For the 
foregoing reasons most of the plans were developed with little 
faculty participation. He then asked for an explanation of the 
statement in Mr. Lynton's memo of January 7 which read, "Plans 
are not themselves policy documents, but constitute operational 
implementation of policy." The memo then goes on to say that the 
plans do not require formal governance approval, but will be wide- 
ly distributed. He said he was puzzled because this implied that 
policy documents went to the faculty and others for recommenda- 
tion. He asked what policy documents guide operational decisions 
on things such as which department's funds are cut, etc. Mr. 
Lynton said the basic policy documents are those which are gener- 
ated through Committees and the Board; for example, the Trustee 
document which set enrollment guidelines. Mr. Lynton said that 
an example of the plans he was referring to in his memo would be 
a proposal of an academic department to shift resources from one 
area of concentration where there was lessening student demand 
to an area where there was growing demand. It was understood, he 
continued, that the plans were subject to continuing revision. 
Mr. Lynton said the plan was intended to be a priority statement 
and the same kind of statement would, in turn, be made at the 
college level. 



Replying to a question by Trustee Cronin, Mr. Puryear 
said some judgments had been made at Amherst in regard to where 
programs should be curtailed. The five-year academic plans indi- 
cated that cuts were anticipated in the Faculties of Humanities 
and Fine Arts, Natural Sciences and Mathematics and Social and 
Behavioral Sciences. These units were to have reduced funds. 
And, as the document clearly indicated, within each of the larger 
categories within the University, there would be some programs 
that would be funded at a higher level. However, decreases will 
be the general rule. Mr. Puryear said resources would be moved 
to the professional schools and to the fine arts, and he hoped 
some funds could be held in reserve to meet contingencies; such 
as, for example, charges in the student mix, and to launch new 
and innovative programs. He noted that tentative priorities had 
been established. He said structural problems had been encountered 
in determining, for instance, when faculty had to be consulted 
and what guidelines had been laid down by the Board. Consulta- 
tion with the faculty, he concluded, was a time-consuming process, 



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President Wood said the planning process had developed 
from the recognition some years back that the University was en- 
tering a period of steady state financing. Part of the process 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

had been to convince faculty members and departmental chairmen 
that hard choices would have to be made. As a former departmental 
chairman, he had never envisioned academic hari kari as a possible 
choice. There were many stages to the master planning process: 
once the department had set its priorities these were forwarded 
to the dean and priorities were set at the College level; the 
deans, in turn, forwarded these to the Provost and campus prior- 
ities were established and forwarded to the President's Office; 
and there the campus plans would be analyzed, reviewed, alterna- 
tive options considered and efforts made to relate them to the mic- 
year budget. A set of scenarios of possible courses of action, 
which will be devised by the Planning Office on the basis of this 
overall review, will then be sent to the campuses for their review 
and recommendation. At the end of this long process a clear and 
articulate University plan will emerge and be presented to the 
Board for its devision. 

The adoption of the University Governance document, 
President Wood continued, and the establishment of the Committees 
on Long-Range Planning and Budget and Finance had greatly influ- 
enced the form of the planning process, as had the multicampus 
committees, working on a campus-by- campus basis. President Wood 
said he hoped the University plan would in some way compensate 
for the frustration, expressed earlier at the meeting, caused by 
the slowness of campus response. Mrs. Robinson said the Commit- 
tee's sense of frustration stemmed from an extended series of 
procrastinations from the campuses whenever information was re- 
quired. In the past there had been times when such delays fore- 
closed possible courses of action. 

Professor Schwartz said he sympathized fully with the 
need for action. However, it appeared to him that the Committee 
was falling into a dangerous sort of model and into a view of the 
University that was contrary to his own. He acknowledged that it ! 
would be helpful if departmental chairmen had clear goals, policiejs 
and reports to be implemented. However, speaking as a department 
chairman, he said he would find it strange that his only role 
would be to implement policy. He said there was no adequate mech- 
anism to allow faculty and student input into the initial stage 
of the planning process. He stressed that he was not saying that 
faculty and students should make the final decisions, this obvi- 
ously was the role of the Administration and the Board of Trustee 
He said that Mr. Lynton's earlier remarks about plans being wide- 
ly distributed were not helpful. He said that campus plans at 
Boston were not widely distributed nor were they discussed; fur- 
ther, he saw no mechanism which postulated that plans should be 
so distributed. He said he was asking that means be provided 
which would enable faculty and students to have a part to play in 
the beginning of planning. He opined that the Board was mistaken 
if it had a policy under which departmental chairmen and faculty 
were used primarily to review and implement plans. 



-7- 



L-RP Comm. 
2/23/77 



-5. c - 



L-RP Comm. 

2/23/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Carlson said Professor Schwartz was voicing one 
of the oldest problems of Faculty/Trustee relationships. No one 
on the Board assumes that the faculty and the administration are 
employed only to implement plans. He noted that he had been one 
of the strong proponents of establishing the Long-Range Planning 
Committee because it was apparent at the time that planning was 
being done entirely by the faculty by default. Trustees had prac- 
tically no input. Speaking as a Trustee, he said he would not 
find it meaningful to sit on a Board having the sole function of 
finding resources to fulfill faculty desires. He said the Board 
had a legitimate claim to input into the planning process and that 
everyone concerned should try to improve the process to make it 
more workable. Mr. Lynton stressed that the planning process begin 
at the faculty level. However, the process is not one wherein 
the department compiles a wish list or a description of the status; 
quo. In the planning process the department sets its own prior- 
ities, these then go to the decanal level; there the priorities 
of the departments are aggregated and, with some faculty input, 
choices are made from among the priorities. Without faculty input: 
at the initial stage, the planning process cannot begin. 

Chancellor Golino said that the Report on the Fine Arts, 
as a matter of course, had been sent to the UM/Boston Assembly. 
As noted in his memo transmitting that Report, there had been no 
response from the Assembly. He said he would have liked to have 
had the Assembly's reaction to the report before presenting it to 
the Committee. The Assembly had been given sufficient time to 
react but had not done so. 

Mr. Steamer said he felt Professor Schwartz had distorted 
what had taken place with regard to the planning process at Bostoiji. 
The process began in the departments, went to the Deans and then 
to the Dean's Council. The resultant report had been sent to the 
Vice President for Academic Affairs and to a faculty committee 
for review. He suggested that perhaps Professor Schwartz wanted 
to review the process at every stage. It would be impossible for 
every faculty member to do this, but provision, he said, was made 
for faculty representation at all levels. 



Professor Schwartz said the limitations explicated made 
it clear that it was inappropriate to say faculty input at the 
departmental level was important. He contended that it is only 
when faculty members are placed on committees to aid the Deans 
and the Vice Chancellor in developing University-wide plans that 
faculty begin to disassociate themselves from narrow departmental 
interests and look broadly at what has to be done in the College 
and in the University. To his knowledge there had been a commit- 
tee that reviewed along with the Dean a planning report for the 
College of Liberal Arts, but this had not happened with respect 
to the campus planning report. 

President Wood said it was important to underline the 
fact that differences between the faculty and the Trustees were 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

usually not over matters of substance. He cited the example of 
the report of the New Directions Committee and the Report of the 
President's Committee on the Future University of Massachusetts. 
Both documents expressed similar missions and goals. He stressed 
that without plans and the time necessary to complete the plan- 
ning process, priorities would be established by those whose only 
concerns were budgetary. He said it was apparent that a coherent 
University-wide report responding to the Council's recommendationjs 
was needed. This would be developed. Chairman Rowland said such 
a report would be helpful, particularly if it were received in 
sufficient time prior to the next meeting of the Committee. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit 
tee, and the meeting was adjourned at 2:35 p.m. 



Qtuj^K^^ 



-V. 



yyGlady^ Keith Hardy 

" ^ or- -rat- a 



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Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



~S25! 



L-RP Comm. 
2/23/77 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

February 23, 1977; 3:00 p.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Clark, Robertson, Rowland, Shearer, Troy; Sec- 
retary Hardy; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustees Gordon and Spiller 



Other Trustees: Trustees Breyer, Burack, Crain, Cronin, Eddy, 



Marks, McNeil, Morgenthau; Mrs. Blues tone representing Commis- 
sioner Fielding 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cass, 
Executive Assistant to the President and Director of the Institute: 
for Labor Affairs; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director and Associate 
Vice President; Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Mr. White, Director 
of University Relations 

Guest : Mr. Arthur Menard, Labor Counsel 



The meeting was called to order at 3:05 p.m. Chairman 
Healey said that the meeting would immediately go into executive 
session to discuss collective bargaining. He said that Secretary 
Hardy had informed him that Committees of the Board were not re- 
quired to adhere to the formalities laid down in the Trustee By- 
laws for executive sessions, but he wanted all Committees, as a 
matter of procedure, to abide by these formalities. At 3:08 p.m. 
it was moved and seconded, and on roll call, unamimously 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss collective 
bargaining. 

At 5:55 p.m., it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED : To end the executive session. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was adjourned at 6:00 p.m. 



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Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 






Executive 
Session 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

March 8, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff ; Chairman Spiller; President Wood; 
Trustees Burack, Clark and Dennis; Mr. Colby representing Trustee 
Winthrop; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Committee Members Absent ; Trustees Eddy and McNulty 

Office of the President : Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Plan- 
ning; Mr. Brigham, Senior University Planner 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Littlefield, Planning Director 

UM/Boston : Mr. Meehan, Planning Director; Mr. Prince, Planning 
Office 

Guests : Trustee-elect Judy Baker; Mr. Fields, Executive Office 
for Educational Affairs; Mr. Adams, Consultant to the Peninsula 
Planning Committee 

The meeting came to order at 10:10 a.m. Chairman 
Spiller said the key item on the agenda was the briefing on 
Columbia Point; however, the meeting would first hear reports 
on four problem areas, three at UM/Boston and one at UM/Amherst, 
which stemmed from actions or inactions on the part of bodies 
other than the University, mainly the Bureau of Building Con- 
struction. 

He asked for a status report on the Tillson Power Plant 
at Amherst. Mr. Littlefield said the Committee, at its last 
meeting, had received copies of a letter from the Chief of the 
Environmental Protection Division of the Attorney General's 
Office. The letter had listed five actions which the BBC had 
agreed to undertake with a view to making the Tillson Plant 
operable, thus enabling the University to close down the old 
power plant which violated air pollution standards. Two of the 
actions related to problems within the plant itself rather than 
with the tie lines. These were to have the BBC authorize the 
original designers, Jackson & Moreland, to set up a team to study 
the power plant's problem and to direct the Jackson & Moreland 
team to be on site no later than February 17, 1977. On February 
23, the team appeared on campus. The team did not accept offers 
of aid from the professional staff of UM/Amherst and was not ac- 
companied by BBC representatives. The other actions agreed to by 
the BBC included requiring the designers to respond to three sets 
of questions previously submitted by the University. These ques- 



"5263 



UM/Amherst — 
Status Report 
on Tillson 
Power Plant 



- 5264 



B&G Comm, 
3/8/77 



UM/Boston — 
Seawater 
Cooling 
System 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

tions concerned the adequacy of the repair program, the perform- 
ance characteristics of the original design, and the future reli- 
ability of the system. 

The designers have submitted a preliminary prospectus 
for the repair and a response to one of the three sets of ques- 
tions. Their responses were in several respects inadequate, and 
a letter to the BBC was in preparation indicating these inadequa- 
cies in some detail. The University will strongly urge the BBC 
to direct Jackson & Moreland and the C. T. Main architectural 
engineering firm to consider the University's responses in prepar- 
ing the answers to the other sets of questions and modifications 
to the work program. In the final action agreed to by the BBC, 
C. T. Main was asked to answer reliability questions and also to 
review an economic analysis prepared by the University. Mrs. 
Robinson said the economic analysis would permit the comparison 
of alternative approaches based on operating and replacement costs 
over 20 years as well as capital costs. All parties agreed to 
meet April 15 to try to agree to a schedule and consent judgment. 

Chairman Spiller noted that the Board had not accepted 
the Tillson Power Plant even though it had been "completed" in 
1974 and had been requesting action from the BBC since that time. 
Trustee Clark said the Board always seemed to have problems with 
the BBC. She asked if the Bureau was an entity unto itself. 
Chairman Spiller said the BBC was currently responsible to the 
Department of Administration and Finance but seemed to move at 
its own pace. Mr. Littlefield said there was a possibility that 
the Tillson plant would remain inoperative for an unacceptable 
length of time and consideration had been given to installing a 
pollution reducing precipitator in the old plant. If the precip- 
itator was needed, the Commonwealth would have to appropriate 
money for its installation. 

The meeting then turned to the Seawater Cooling System 
at UM/Boston. Mr. Meehan said a meeting had been held with the 
BBC and the designer to discuss the proposed use of the recent 
$225,000 appropriation for temporary repairs to the system. The 
repairs were necessary as the seawater used as a coolant continu- 
ously corroded the system. He said he was somewhat surprised at 
the meeting to learn that the appropriation (for the reconstruc- 
tion of the system) had been assigned a low priority by the Gov- 
ernor's Office on the assumption that it would not be possible to 
redesign the system in the time estimated by the UM/Boston Plan- 
ning Office. This despite the fact that the BBC had seen the 
schedule and found it to be realistic and satisfactory. Chairman 
Spiller asked if the Office of Administration and Finance had 
commented on the schedule. Mr. Prince said the only response had 
been the priority assigned the reconstruction of the Seawater 
Circulating System. 

Mr. Meehan said the schedule was predicated on the com- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

pletion of the final design and working drawings by mid-September', 
1977, and their approval by mid-October. The reconstruction was 
scheduled to be completed at the end of 1978. In response to 
the Chairman's question, Mr. Meehan said a survey had shown that 
the extant system, with necessary repairs, would probably functiojn 
for two more summers. In the opinion of the operators of the 
system, the continuous deterioration of the system could lead to 
a complete failure in the spring of 1979. Trustee Dennis asked 
what the result of this would be. Mr. Meehan said the campus 
would have to be closed as the buildings were all sealed for 
acoustical reasons and mechanical circulation of the air was im- 
perative. Mr. Colby said that the problem stemmed from the use 
of seawater and asked if the Navy Bureau of Ships had been con- 
sulted in the design of the system. The Navy and even Maine 
fishermen, he pointed out, have used seawater as a coolant suc- 
cessfully for several decades. Mr. Meehan said he did not know 
if the Navy had been consulted during the design of the system, 
but that he discussed some of the proposed solutions with naval 
research specialists. 

Chairman Spiller asked if the situation could be summed 
up by saying that the Trustees ran the risk of having a $130 mil- 
lion facility closed down in May of 1979. Mr. Meehan said this 
was the case as deterioration is continuing. However, the UM/ 
Boston Planning Office had specific design instructions for re- 
construction prepared and if the schedule laid out were followed, 
the threatened disaster would not occur. 



The Chairman then asked what was being done about dis- 
covering who was at fault in this matter. The President's Office 
Mr. Meehan replied, had suggested to the BBC that the Seawater 
Plant and two other projects — the roof of the library and the 
HVAC in College Building 010 — be referred to the Attorney General 
for possible legal action since the designers appear to bear some 
responsibility for the failures. However, he continued, he knew 
of no action by the BBC or any other arm of the State to investi- 
gate legal steps with regard to the Seawater Plant. Chairman 
Spiller said the Committee should consider asking the BBC to 
initiate action through the Attorney General. Trustee Dennis 
said the Committee should at least go on record as being aware 
of and concerned by these problems. Chairman Spiller said that 
if all else failed, the only route to follow would be to bring 
the matter to the attention of the public. 

The meeting then turned to the matter of the roof of 
the Library at UM/Boston. Mr. Meehan said the architect of the 
building had originally appeared to be prepared to assume respon- 
sibility for the condition of the roof and had, after developing 
a solution, received a bid of $104,000 to correct the problem. 
The architect had then consulted the insurance company and was 
taking the position that other participants in the design should 
share in the responsibility. The University's capital outlay 



*-*f~<rj. 



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B&G Comm. 
3/8/77 



UM/Boston — 
Library Roof 



*"* %j)?CT* 



B&G Comm. 
3/8/77 



UM/ Bo st on- 
Physical 
Education 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

request for repairs in FY77 was not funded and the BBC asked the 
University to make a capital outlay request of $195,000 in the 
FY78 budget submission. The request does not preclude legal ac- 
tion against those responsible for the condition. Mrs. Robinson 
said that University Counsel is looking into the matter to see if 
the language of the appropriation could allow an expenditure as 
part of a negotiated settlement, in which the designer would ac- 
cept the bid of $104,000 and absorb a certain portion of the cost 
This solution would result in a cost to the state of $40,000 or 
$50,000, instead of $195,000. In addition, the language of the 
appropriation may be broadened to include certain other problems 
in the Library building, e.g. problems with the ventilating sys- 
tem. In response to Mr. Colby's question, Mrs. Robinson said she 
did not know why a $104,000 job should cost $195,000 but that 
state bidding procedures and standard BBC overhead could bring th^ 
cost to $150,000 to $160,000. Chairman Spiller stressed that 
these issues should be a part of the minutes. Further, counsel 
should be instructed that, in any correspondence with the BBC and 
the Attorney General, the record be made very clear as to faults 
the Trustees found, those responsible for the faults and what ac- 
tions should be taken. Since the University was not a participant 
to the contracts, no other recourse was available. 

President Wood said going public was a possibility but 
unlikely to be helpful at the present time. Another possibility, 
one that had been discussed with other segments of public higher 
education, was the establishment of a higher education building 
authority. 



There was general agreement that the situation with 
regard to construction problems in new University buildings 
should be brought to public notice. Mrs. Robinson cautioned that 
the situation was a complex one. The University was dependent 
on the BBC as it controlled capital outlay funds and a number of 
buildings were still under its aegis. She noted that as long as 
the University had to work within the state construction system, 
it was necessary to have a working relationship with the BBC. 
The first concern was to keep the campuses functioning and the 
question of legal redress was a secondary concern. Also, she 
concluded, she found it hard to believe that the University's 
construction problems were unique; it was time for the State's 
executive office to take a close look at the whole construction 
process. 

Chairman Spiller then asked about the status of the 
Physical Education Building at UM/Boston. Mrs. Robinson outlined 
the recent sequence of events involving the building. In Novem- 
ber the General Counsel of the University, pursuant to Board di- 
rection, had filed suit to require the Director of BBC to release 
the design drawings for bid. By law, the BBC had twenty days in 
which to respond. At the end of the allowed period, the State 
asked for an extension which was granted. At the expiration of 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the twenty-day extension the counsel for the Bureau filed a re- 
sponse asking that the University's suit be disallowed on the 
grounds that the Director of the BBC did not have the power to 
release the documents; the Commissioner of Administration and 
Finance had this power. University Counsel then enlarged the 
suit to include the Commissioner. Again the Department of Admin- 
istration and Finance waited the full twenty days. On the last 
day, Counsel called the Attorney General's Office and was told 
the State was not preparing an answer. University Counsel then 
moved that the case be marked up for a hearing and was waiting to 
go to court. There, in the absence of any answer from the State, 
Counsel would move for a judgment requiring the release of the 
documents. At that hearing it was possible that Counsel for 
Administration and Finance would ask for a further extension. 
The proximate result of these actions by the State was a five- 
month delay with a resultant $300,000 or more inflation in the 
cost of the building. This amount could be directly translated 
into the loss of facilities — particularly outdoor facilities that 
would be directly available to the community. 

Chairman Spiller said he found the actions by the Exec- 
utive Offices to be somewhat less than straightforward. If the 
state administration had an honest disagreement regarding con- 
struction of the Physical Education Building, he said, they need- 
ed only to file legislation to have the appropriation repealed. 
Mr. Littlefield pointed out that the delaying tactics may be a 
deliberate effort to ensure that the bids will come in over budg- 
iet. President Wood said that the Governor had made a public 
statement while visiting the Amherst campus that the development 
of additional athletic facilities at that campus was forestalled 
because of the cost of the Physical Education Building at UM/ 
Boston. 

The meeting then turned to the final item on the agenda, 
a briefing on Columbia Point and the Peninsula Planning Committee 
President Wood reviewed the history of the relationship between 
the University and the residents at Columbia Point and in sur- 
rounding communities ; the initial confrontations over the filling 
of the "lagoon," and fears over housing and traffic impact; the 
Trustee "good neighbor policy" culminating in a policy statement 
covering educational access, employment and the joint use of 
facilities. 

The move to the Harbor Campus in 1974, President Wood 
continued, came at a difficult time because of the national poli- 
cy of reduced expenditures on housing and urban programs. The 
University and a group of neighboring businesses provided funds 
for a survey of the potential impact of the University on the com- 
munity which was sponsored by a large group of community organi- 
zations. The report that ensued painted an unduly dire picture 
of this impact, but it marked the beginning of more open discus- 
sions between the community and the University. The discussions 



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B&G Comm. 
3/8/77 



Briefing on 
Columbia Point 






5268 



B&G Comm. 
3/8/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

were initially volatile and led to formation of an ad hoc Trustee 
Committee. Later the Mayor's Task Force began to work on the 
problems associated with housing and with the Bayside Shopping 
Mall, and on the frustrations felt by community residents and mem- 
bers of the private business sector who were trying to improve 
conditions on the Point. 

The catalyst to end these mutual frustrations came in 
the successful community and University efforts to bring the John 
F. Kennedy Library to Columbia Point. The improved climate led to 
the establishment of the Peninsula Planning Committee under the 
aegis of the University. 

President Wood concluded by saying that some officials 
at HUD see the transformation of Columbia as the most exciting 
development in Boston. 

Trustee Clark said she found a number of disturbing 
things related to Columbia Point. Firstly, the Trustees should 
be aware that the City Council had passed a bill sponsored by 
Councillor Hicks to make the Point a "senior city" for the elder- 
ly. Trustee Clark said that Councillor Hicks had been very respor 
sive to the problems of the elderly but that this particular idea 
was not a good one. She further noted that the Peninsula Planning 
Committee had no representatives from the Savin Hill community. 
This should be corrected. Finally, she said that three of the 
four representatives of Columbia Point on the Peninsula Planning 
Committee were not residents of the Point. While they all worked 
at agencies located in and serving the project, they were not as 
responsive as they would be if they were residents. 

President Wood said that in the absence of an establish- 
ed process to select community leaders, it was sometimes necessar} 
to select people on the basis of apparent dedication and to deal 
with whatever formal structure was available. Also, the composi- 
tion of the Peninsula Planning Committee was not frozen and could 
be altered. Trustee Clark said it was vital to include community 
residents in any effort to make things work. Further, it would 
be a mistake to wait for community frustration to manifest itself 
before including representatives. 

Trustee Dennis said that while he was not a resident of 
the Point and had not been involved in its problems, he had heard 
rumblings of discontent. He said it was his greatest concern to 
be assured that the community was actively involved. 



Trustee Dennis then asked for clarification as to the 
structure of the University's involvement in the community. He 
said that as a Trustee he had been somewhat bothered to learn of 
certain phases of the Columbia Point project only when non- 
University people called him to ask about them. In view of this 
and the continuing and possibly growing commitment of staff re- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

sources by the University, he felt it was necessary to have some 
formal structure to monitor the University's involvement. This 
structure, he concluded, could entail a vote by the Trustees. 

President Wood said matters relating to the community 
had always been brought to the attention of the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds. Chairman Spiller said it was important to 
remember that the University's commitment to the development of 
Columbia Point had always been that the University was part of 
the community, and that fostering improvements on the Point was 
in the community interest. The Committee could initiate a vote 
if this seemed desirable. Trustee Dennis said he would so recom- 
mend. President Wood said he would ask the Secretary's Office to 
compile a list of relevant votes and Trustee discussions over the 
years and present these to the Committee. Chairman Spiller said 
these could be the basis of a new, updated vote. 

Chairman Spiller then asked for review of recent devel- 
opments at the Point. Mr. Brigham said the three major recent 
developments were the setting of the date for the groundbreaking 
for the John F. Kennedy Library, the decision by the Boston 
Teachers Union to rent and renovate a significant portion of Bay- 
side Mall, and the agreement by the Boston Housing Authority with 
the tenants' decision to spend $4.4 million in federal funds now 
available for comprehensive renovation of the majority of the 
occupied units of the Columbia Point Housing Project. He stressed 
that these three items were definite. The Peninsula Planning Com-' 
mittee was now examining a constellation of other possibilities. 
These possibilities were centered in three major opportunity 
areas — 

— The Pumphouse Area, which, in addition to possible 
uses of the Pumphouse itself, was being considered 
as the location of the State Archives and the Boston 
Opera Company; 

— Bayside Mall - consideration was being given to what 
portions of the Mall could be revitalized, in addition 
to that now owned by the Boston Teachers Union; and 

— Housing Area - a number of possibilities were being 
explored, including funding to bring the total number 
of renovated units up to 600, and the opportunities 
for additional new housing. HUD, which until recently 
was unwilling to discuss the possibility of selective 
demolition of the mothballed buildings, now seems 
ready to take a more open attitude. 

Mr. Brigham said the Peninsula Planning Committee's 
examination was not based on any prior assumptions, just a shared 
sense that much had been done and that the impetus supplied by 
recent developments should not be allowed to dissipate. Finally, 



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3/8/77 



"5270 



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3/8/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

he said, there was still the question of a Columbia stop on the 
Quincy line of the MBTA. Mr. Adams commented that he had had some 
involvement with Columbia Point for four years, and for most of 
that time the prospects were bleak. Suddenly everything seemed 
to be moving. This activity, he said, helped to bring the Penin- 
sula Planning Committee's purpose into focus — the need to coordi- 
nate the ongoing activities and to represent the variegated inter- 
ests of those affected by future developments. 

President Wood said the coming months were critical as 
there were a number of separate enterprises going forward, each 
with its own architect and each with its own ideas. The Peninsuls 
Planning Committee, or some more formal structure, was needed 
to oversee the project as a whole if chaos were to be avoided. 
Trustee Burack said some attention should be paid to the extent 
and limitations of the University's role. Mrs. Robinson said the 
University's role was in part forced upon it. If other parties 
to the project, for example, city agencies, would take a stronger 
role, this would enable the University to take a more distant one 
President Wood said that an urban university could not choose to 
turn away from its adjacent communities. The problem of what 
obligations the urban campus had to its neighbors had to be ad- 
dressed. He said his only rule in this issue was not to substi- 
tute for other institutions. 

Trustee Burack asked if the proposal to house the Opera 
Company located at the Point was realistic. She said she had 
read that a new facility would cost $30 million, while the Music 
Hall, a possible alternative, could be renovated for $5 million. 

Mrs. Robinson said the Opera Company appeared to be 
engaged in a tug of war with the City and other supporters of the 
Music Hall. The Company regards the Music Hall as unsuitable 
because it will have only one overly large performing area. The 
Company wanted a variety of performance spaces as well as space 
for storage, educational activities, and administrative offices. 
She said she was not sure that the Opera Company had fully ana- 
lyzed the financial implications of its proposals. 

Chairman Spiller asked leave to return to the matter of 
the Physical Education Building. He asked Mr. Fields what the 
position of Secretary Parks was on the building. Mr. Fields note< 
that he had been asked to attend the meeting on very short notice 
and had not been briefed very fully. He said he knew of no change 
in the Secretary's position, but was not able to determine what 
that position was. He also assured the Committee that Secretary 
Parks would be fully informed of the sense of the meeting. 



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tee, and the meeting adjourned at 11:45 a.m. 



/&**- 



Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

March 22, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 
Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Shearer; President Wood 
Trustees Conti, Cronin, McNeil; Ms. Kaplan representing Trustee 
Okin; Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Anrig, Crain, Eddy and 
Morgenthau 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Ms. Simmons, Assistant Vice President for Academic Af- 
fairs; Ms. Taylor, Assistant to the Budget Director 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Mr. Preston, Associate 
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Mr. James, Assistant Chancellor 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Feinblatt, Associate Dean and Director of 
Student Affairs 

Guests : Ms. Baker, UM/Boston Student Trustee-elect; Ms. Batiste, 
UM/Amherst Student Trustee-elect; Ms. Shukri, Executive Office 
for Educational Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 10:10 a.m. by Chair^j 
man Shearer. Chairman Shearer welcomed the new Student Trustees- 
elect to the meeting. Vice President Lynton then introduced Mr. 
Preston, Associate Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs at UM/ 
Amherst . 

At the request of the Chairman, President Wood briefly 
summarized the agenda items, stating that they represented both 
fiscal and programmatic matters and that the need-based tuition 
waiver policy had been established as a result of the tuition in- 
creases approved last year. 

Chairman Shearer thanked the President for his remarks 
and asked Ms. Simmons to introduce the first agenda item, Need- 
Based Tuition Waiver Policy . She said this policy had been ini- 
tiated in May, 1976, so that no student would be denied access tc 
the University because of the increase in tuition. This policy 
was approved on a one-year trial basis after which it was to be 
reviewed for effectiveness. The material forwarded to the Com- 
mittee, she said, indicated available federal and state funds, 



"5271 



Need-Based 
Tuition Waiver 
Policy 






Student Affairs 
3/22/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

outlined the results of a survey of how University of Massachu- 
setts students finance their education, summarized the character- 
istics of students who received waivers in 1976-77 and offered 
recommendations for Board approval. She said that it was felt 
that the one year was not a sufficient period of time to adequate 
ly assess the effectiveness of the program. In addition, federal 
and state aid has not kept pace with tuition increases and fees. 
Financial aid, she said, was related to the cost of education, 
and as that cost escalates, the number of students requiring aid 
also increases . Initial results indicate that the policy has 
served the target population for which it was designed. 

Tuition waivers are a method, she said, for augmenting 
financial aid. There are very limited discretionary funds avail- 
able at UM/Boston and UM/Worcester . Of those available at UM/ 
Amherst, a considerable portion is used to aid foreign students. 
The need-based tuition waiver policy was designed to aid those 
students who have incurred heavy debt loads over the years, such 
as graduate students, medical students, and independent students. 
Ms. Simmons then read the recommendation. Ms. Kaplan said she 
thought the reference to "biannual" review was intended to read 
"semi-annual" review. Such was the intent and the wording was so 
amended. 

Ms. Taylor explained that at UM/Boston there are a 
large number of students who are fiscally independent and to whom 
these need-based waivers have been of great assistance. She said 
the need-based tuition waivers have been a fund of last resort, 
when all other means of financial assistance had been exhausted. 
They have served as an insurance policy for those students whose 
needs could not be met by any other means. At UM/Worcester , she 
said, medical students have been faced with decreasing amounts 
of available grant money. Loan money is available, but the level 
of debt for medical students is heavy. At UM/Amherst the need is 
harder to categorize because of the diversity of the students. 

Ms. Kaplan asked if the need-based waivers were part of 
the financial package, would it be necessary for students to re- 
apply for the waivers each year. Ms. Taylor said that this was 
so since financial need is assessed on a year-to-year basis. Mr. 
Lynton added, for clarity, that students do not actually apply 
for the need-based waivers. They apply for financial aid and the 
financial aid office decides from what sources the aid will be 
derived. 

Chairman Shearer asked if statistics were available 
indicating the number of students who would be affected if the 
need-based tuition waiver policy was not extended. Ms. Simmons 
said the only way to determine this would be to make a survey of 
the students who were accepted but did not enroll to learn the 
reason why they did not matriculate. Chairman Shearer asked if 
an attempt had been made to obtain these statistics. Mr. Preston 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

replied that to date this had only been touched on peripherally 
by the Admissions Office, but that it was a matter which should 
be pursued. He said also the fact that the policy was not passed 
last year until May, which was after the financial aid packages 
had been put together for most students, made it difficult to as- 
sess the impact of the tuition waiver policy. 

At the request of Chairman Shearer, Trustee Cronin 
commented on the concerns of the students with regard to financial 
aid in general. He said they were opposed to the tuition increase 
and were afraid that aid would not catch up with increased costs. 
He said aid from the federal government and other sources had 
been running about 3 percent behind costs; however, the gap seemed 
to be closing. Unless financial aid catches up, he said, the 
tuition waivers would be an absolute necessity. 

There being no further discussion, on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
extend for the academic years 1977-1978 and 
1978-1979, the need-based tuition waiver policy 
as approved by the Board on May 5, 1976, and 
contained in Trustee Document T76-071; further, 
to recommend that the Board direct the Financial 
Aid Offices to include amounts of tuition waived 
and profiles of waiver recipients in their semi- 
annual reports to the Committee on Student Affairs 
on Admissions and Financial Aid; and further, to 
recommend that the Board direct the Financial Aid 
Offices to report to the Board immediately in the 
event that drastic changes in federal or state 
financial aid funding warrant reconsideration of 
the policy. 

Chairman Shearer turned next to the second item of 
agenda, Student Fees — UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-053) . Ms. Simmons 
opened discussion of this item by explaining that the separation 
of the fees from the operating budget was the first step in the 
process of developing multi-year fee schedules. She said UM/ 
Boston and UM/Worcester fees would be discussed at the next meet- 
ing. She said the fees in question had been reviewed by the 
appropriate advisory bodies, including the Rents and Fees Commit- 
I tee of the Student Government Association and by student leaders. 
The Committee on Budget and Finance would discuss the fees at its 
April meeting, she said, but the Student Affairs Committee should 
be concerned with the student issues which relate to the request- 
ed fee increases. She said that it is recommended that the man- 
datory fees be increased $139. The cost-of-living adjustments 
resulting from the Alliance settlement, she said, accounted for 
$116 of this increase. The additional $23 is attributable to 
programmatic and inflationary costs. 



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Student Affairs 
3/22/77 



UM/Amherst — 
Student Fees 
(Doc. T77-053) 



Student Affairs 
3/22/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Gulko, UM/ Amherst Budget Director, explained that 
UM/ Amherst administration was developing a process by which fee 
schedules would be provided on a multi-year basis. The document 
before the Committee, he said, was an attempt to separate the 
fees from the budgets, a first step in this complicated process. 
He said an attempt was being made to run the revenue-based opera- 
tions in the same way as other activities on campus — working 
toward a target rather than simply passing through expenses as 
they occurred. 

One of the issues faced this year, he said, was whether 
fees should be raised in the middle of the academic year in order 
to cover the cost of the Alliance agreement. Since this would 
be a hardship on students, the administration chose to use oper- 
ating reserves. The proposed fees, he said, reflected the spread- 
ing of the FY 1977 costs over two years so that the fees would 
remain constant. A salary reserve is built into the FY 1978 fees, 
he said, which should cover any reasonable cost-of-living adjust- 
ment. 

Mr. Gulko called attention to corrections to pages 14 
and 15 of Doc. T77-053, which, he said, were the result of the 
pages having been printed before the cost-of-living increase 
occurred. He distributed corrected pages to those present. Wher- 
ever reserves made it possible, he said, part of the cost of the 
agreement had been absorbed from reserves so that it was not nec- 
essary to raise fees to cover the entire cost — this was true in 
the case, for instance, of residence hall and boarding hall fees. 
The $20 increase in boarding hall fees, he said, represented less 
than 6 percent of the increase in raw food costs. However, re- 
serves were not available to cover such costs as additional staff 
for the Legal Services Office, reflected by the increase in the 
Student Activities Tax. Mr. Preston added that the LSO and the 
Day Care Centers were subsidized by both the undergraduate and 
graduate student senates. In addition, the graduate student 
senate had budgeted an increase for research. 

The 5 percent increases in the Freiburg, Oxford and 
Panama programs, said Mr. Gulko, were the result of an increase 
in air fare, and the decrease in the New York Outreach program 
reflected the fact that the students in that program were finding 
their own housing rather than living in quarters provided by the 
University. 

Mr. Gulko said the campus is currently considering a 
major policy change in the operation of the day care centers, 
which would be brought to the Board for consideration at a later 
date. Changes were being considered, he said, in order to take 
advantage of public money available for this purpose. Chairman 
Shearer said that she felt chances of obtaining additional funds 
from the state for day care centers were very poor. Considera- 
ble discussion ensued with regard to various aspects of day care 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and the financing thereof. 

Trustee Cronin commented on the reasons for the in- 
crease in the Student Activities Tax, indicating that $4 of the 
increase was required to cover cost-of-living increases for per- 
sonnel. He said that tax had not been increased in three years. 
The remainder of the increase, he said, was the result of a drop 
in enrollment in these activities. Although the fee would in- 
crease, the activities would have to be curtailed. Trustee-elect 
Batiste added that students had been concerned that there might 
be a cutback in commuter services. The $3 increase, she said, 
would simply maintain services to students. Mr. Preston added 
that there had been much student participation in the develop- 
ment of the proposed fees and the students were aware of the 
options. Discussion ensued on the process by which the SGA allot' 
ted money to the various activities. 

Ms. Kaplan questioned the 39 percent increase in tui- 
tion for in-state students, when there was no similar increase 
for out-of-state students. Mr. Lynton explained that the tuition 
for out-of-state students had been substantially increased the 
previous year by Legislative mandate, which stipulated that tui- 
tion must be at least 95 percent of the instructional cost. He 
said calculations indicated that it would not be necessary to in- 
crease the out-of-state tuition in FY 1978. 

Chairman Shearer suggested that it might be more help- 
ful to those reviewing the fees if comparative data was included 
in the narrative portion of the document as well as in the final 
summaries. 

Mr. Feinblatt asked if students had ever challenged 
the mandatory fees. Trustee Cronin replied in the affirmative 
and gave examples. He said the students feel the University 
should share the cost of the Campus Center. Mr. Preston added 
that the Campus Center issue is being pursued through the Legis- 
lature and a bill has been filed requesting the State to assume 
the cost of the Center, as they had originally agreed to do. He 
said that the Campus is hoping to include the Campus Center Ga- 
rage as a part of the balanced transportation system, which 
should reduce the deficit operation for that portion of the com- 
plex. 

Trustee McNeil questioned the need for the 17 percent 
increase in the Health Services fee and the 23 percent increase 
in the Campus Center fee. Mr. Gulko replied that $16 of the $18 
increase in Health Services and $15 of the $18 increase in Campus 
Center fees were the result of the Alliance agreement and, there- 
fore, unavoidable since the trust fund operations must be self- 
supporting. He said the increases for FY 1978 were actually less 
than the increased cost, since the cost of the Alliance agreement 
was being spread over a two-year period. In cases where reserves 



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Student Affairs 
3/22/77 



-5- 



"5276 



Student Affairs 
3/22/77 



UM/Boston — 
Student 
Support 
Services 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

were available, he emphasized, a portion of the cost was being 
covered by the reserve funds rather than increasing the fees to 
meet the total of the salary adjustments. 

Mr. Gulko explained briefly why two new trust funds 
were being requested. The Instructional Trust Fund would allow 
consolidation of laboratory fees within the University accounting 
system and would allow budgeting for these fees in a manner sim- 
ilar to budgeting for other trust funds on campus. The Man & 
Environment Research Services Trust Fund, he said, would permit 
greater control over the use of the coastal laboratory buildings 
and field research equipment at Truro. He said additional infor- 
mation on these Trust funds would be coming to the Budget and Fi- 
nance Committee for their discussion of fees in April. 

Mr. Lynton said the whole matter of the delegation of 
authority to set fees was under discussion by the administration 
and a proposal would be forthcoming at a later date suggesting 
that authority to set some of these fees be delegated to the cam- 
puses so as to remove the necessity for Board action on minor 
changes . 

Chairman Shearer suggested that the Student Affairs Com 
mittee should consider only those fees which affect student activ 
ities and not concern itself with all fees. 

Chairman Shearer turned next to the last item of agenda, 
the matter of Student Support Services — UM/Boston, requesting Ms. 
Simmons to comment. Ms. Simmons said that since the history of 
this matter was covered in the material forwarded to the Commit- 
tee, she would first review the student characteristics that 
determine the kind of services required. The student population 
at UM/Boston, she said, is composed in large number of persons 
whose parents have not attended college, many are older than the 
traditional college attendees, family income is below national 
norms, and approximately 40 percent require remedial assistance. 
In addition, services are needed for handicapped students and 
foreign students. At UM/3oston, she said, consideration should 
be given to four areas: 1) access, 2) retention, 3) career op- 
portunities, and 4) effective delivery of services. Access, 
said Ms. Simmons, was probably the most important area for dis- 
cussion. If UM/Boston was to continue its mission as an urban 
university, it must have a strong program for the identification 
and recruitment of students with potential, as well as assessment 
of students either prior to or during the first weeks of attend- 
ance on campus. Other information of interest, she said, was the 
percentage of urban versus suburban students and the reasons why 
students dropped out of school. Chancellor Golino, she said, 
had addressed the matter of academic advising in his report. 
What must be determined is whether current academic advising is 
sufficient, and whether it is also necessary to have an office 
for career counseling and placement services. It is important, 



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she said, to find a means for measuring the effectiveness of the 
services provided. 

Chairman Shearer suggested since time was limited and 
this was such an important area, the Committee limit discussion 
at this meeting to the matter of access, taking up other matters 
at a subsequent meeting. At the Chairman's request, Chancellor 
Golino commented from his perspective. He said he would like to 
make a few general remarks and would then speak in particular 
about access. He said he felt there were certain misconceptions 
about what UM/Boston students want from college. Just because 
the students are nontraditional, he said, does not mean that they 
want only certain kinds of education. They want the full range 
of educational opportunities available to university students 
elsewhere. They are not concerned merely with urban problems or 
career education. They want an education which allows them the 
greatest number of options. Many of the current problems, he 
said, stem from the original conception of the campus, which 
anticipated six liberal arts colleges. The transition to a small 
er campus geared to an urban commuter population necessitated 
many changes. It was not until 1974, he said, that there was an 
Office for Student Affairs. The campus is currently attempting 
to set up a central office to handle student support services. 

With regard to access, Chancellor Golino said the 
campus has tried to develop outreach programs that let students 
know what the campus has to offer them. One such program is 
Another Course to College, in which UM/Boston personnel go out 
into the urban high schools and identify students in the eleventh 
grade who have potential but who would probably never have consi- 
dered college as an option open to them. These students are 
given courses which guarantee their admission to UM/Boston, or 
to another college of their choice providing they can meet admis- 
sion requirements. 

He said there is another kind of student looking for 
access. This is the person who is not necessarily interested in 
obtaining a degree, but who wishes to get an education which will 
allow upward mobility in his or her profession. 

Mr. Tubbs said that two major concerns of his office 
are the number of students who enter but who do not graduate and 
the number of students who have potential but who are not aware 
that they could attend. He said that because of the diversity 
of the student body, a wide range of student support services is 
critical. Mr. James added that 36 percent of the students en- 
rolled at UM/Boston come from the inner city, and 84 percent come 
from within Route 495. Two hundred students, he said, are cur- 
rently enrolled in the ACC program. Chancellor Golino said of 
the initial 200 students in the ACC program, only 4 or 5 failed 
to graduate. He emphasized that these were students who had not 
originally thought of college as an option. These students are 



Student Affairs 
3/22/77 



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Student Affairs 
3/22/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

outside of the some 300 minority students who are in the college 
track in the city high schools. 

Ms. Kaplan commented that elementary school enrollment^ 
were dropping and that this must be a consideration when looking 
at future potential college enrollments. She said the college 
must look elsewhere than high schools for future students. Mr. 
Lynton said a report will be forthcoming shortly on the Univer- 
sity's role in adult, life-long education. 

Mr. James said that in addition to access for the 
changing student population, consideration must be given to the 
kinds of programs which will be required, such as the recently 
established extended-day program, and the sources of funding for 
these programs. 

Chairman Shearer asked what the capacity of the campus 
was fiscally to continue access to the urban, nontraditional stu- 
dent. She said that there should be built into the structure of 
the programs some means so that this access could continue even 
with limited funds. She asked if there was some means for measur 
ing the value of the services, such as whether they are being 
used by the students. She said the delivery of the service would 
determine the extent of the use. 

Trustee McNeil asked whether there was a way of deter- 
mining whether the minority students in the college track actual- 
ly did go on to college. Chairman Shearer said that although 
she could not speak with regard to minority students only, there 
were three high schools in Boston which for the last five years 
have sent fewer than two percent of their students on to higher 
education. Mr. Preston said that citywide twenty percent of the 
high school graduates go on to higher education. 

Ms . Simmons asked what the campus was doing to try to 
recruit those minority students in the college track. Mr. James 
said that this year each of these students received a letter 
from the UM/Boston admissions office telling them about the cam- 
pus, inviting them to apply and informing them of available finan 
cial aid. In addition, Mr. Tubbs said, each summer a special 
admissions program is run which enrolls 150 students. This pro- 
gram meets five days a week and offers courses in English and 
math. An interview is the major component in admitting students 
to the program. They are usually older students who have been 
out of high school for several years. If they do well in the 
program, they are urged to continue their education. Chairman 
Shearer stated her concern taht this would automatically exclude 
those people who had to work full time. Mr. Tubbs said that half 
day programs were included to allow working students to partici- 
pate in the program. 

Chairman Shearer asked if there were other ways in 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

which students could be made aware of the opportunities for them 
to continue their educations, since she said she had little faith 
in the guidance programs in the high schools. She suggested that 
this area should be pursued. 

Trustee Conti stated her concern that although the 
freshman class might be nontraditional, the upper classes seem 
to become more traditional. She said that by the time of gradua- 
tion many of the low- income and minority students had disappeared. 
She said she was particularly concerned since recently there had 
been a meeting of people from the Budget Office with personnel 
in the College of Liberal Arts and it seemed that the campus was 
preparing to reduce that College by some 600 students and a num- 
ber of faculty positions and to eliminate some of the small intro- 
ductory classes which were so important to these types of students 
She said she could not understand how centralization and larger 
classes could provide the services needed. 

Mr. James said that the campus had only recently begun 
to compile statistics on student profiles and that it was true 
that services had not been adequate in the past. He said the 
campus is currently trying to improve these services. Chancellor 
Golino added that Ms. Conti' s assumption that the graduates were 
not nontraditional could not be borne out. On the question of 
the budget and the College of Liberal Arts, he said, should the 
campus receive level funding, it would mean the loss of approxi- 
mately $1 million because of the cost-of-living adjustments. He 
said that the College of Public and Community Service and the 
College of Professional Studies had just now become viable in 
size and to reduce enrollments in these colleges would be disas- 
trous. He said he felt that if additional funds were not forth- 
coming, a reduction in enrollment would be necessary if the qual- 
ity of education was not to be eroded. He therefore had asked 
the Vice Chancellors to prepare for him information on what the 
effects of budget cuts would be in their areas and to suggest how 
cuts should be made if they were asked to reduce their budgets by 
5 percent. 

Mr. Lynton added that the President had stated that 
level funding would cripple the University. He said that it was 
prudent planning to limit spending based on the worst possible 
budget, but it should not be assumed that this would necessarily 
result. With regard to attrition, Chancellor Golino said that 
the nationwide rate was 40 percent, and did not feel that attri- 
tion at UM/Boston exceeded this figure. 

Chairman Shearer said that this matter would be a sub- 
ject for ongoing discussion by the Committee. She said it would 
be helpful to have more information on the attrition rate and on 
the character of the graduates — who they are and which groups 
they represent. 



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Student Affairs 
3/22/77 



"5280 

Student Affairs 
3/22/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Feinblatt asked if it would be possible to change 
the date of the next meeting since he would be unable to attend 
on April 21 when UM/Worcester fees would be an item of agenda. 
Mr. Lynton said that this would have to be discussed with the Sec- 
retary's Office. Since several Trustees had other commitments, 
the meeting adjourned at 12:10 p.m. 



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Dorothy Eich« 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE: 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

March 23, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 
Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Troy; President Wood; 



Trustees Breyer, Burack, Crain, Cronin and Morgenthau; Mrs. Blue- 
stone representing Trustee Fielding; Mr. Colby representing Trus- 
tee Winthrop; Miss Eichel, Assistant Secretary; Mr. Miller, 
recorder 

Other Trustees: Mrs. Pinck representing Trustee Dukakis 



Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Mmes. Simmons and Weiner, Assistant Vice Presidents for 
Academic Affairs 

UM/Boston : Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; 



Ms. Fingeret, College of Public and Community Service; Mr. Hart, 
[College of Liberal Arts; Ms. Watson, College of Professional 
Studies; Mr. Wittes , Associate Dean, College of Liberal Arts 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and 



Provost 



Guest: Trustee-elect Batiste 



Chairman Troy called the meeting to order at 10:10 a.m. 
He noted that the first two items on the agenda dealt with per- 
sonnel matters and asked for a motion to go into executive ses- 
sion, after which the meeting would continue in open session. 
At 10:15 a.m. it was so moved and seconded, and on roll call 

VOTED : To enter into executive session. 

At 11:25 a.m. it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED : To end the executive session. 

Chairman Troy asked the indulgence of the meeting to 
deal with two matters not on the agenda. He first welcomed and 
introduced Trustee-elect Batiste and then called on Trustee 
Crain. Trustee Crain said he needed some clarification on the 
University's long-range planning process. He asked if it was 
the case that plans evolved in a "bottom-up" sense, that is, 
goals and timetables, for example, are formulated by academic 
departments and sent to the administration, or do the departments' 
plans respond to goals and timetables for the entire university 
established by the President's Office. Mr. Lynton said the proc- 



o#c81 



Executive 
Session 



""5282 



F&EP Comm. 
3/23/77 



UM/ Boston — 
Action on 
Tenure Appeal 



UM/Worcester — 
Appointment of 
Dr. Stanley 
Walzer as 
Chairman of 
Department of 
Psychiatry and 
Professor of 
Psychiatry with! 
Tenure 
(Doc. T77-080) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ess was primarily the latter, with the clearly stated intention 
of subjecting plans to a series of cyclical processes. Trustee 
Crain said he felt his question required a yes or no answer. 
Either goals and timetables had been established, within which 
framework the campuses could place their plans or they had not 
been. Mr. Lynton said the plans responded to Trustee goals enun- 
ciated in 1974 and 1975, goals which are subject to ongoing revi- 
sion. In response to Trustee Crain' s further question, Mr. Lynton 
said the goals had been established after the onset of budgetary 
stringency. For example, the decisions to restrict the size of 
the Amherst and Boston student bodies had been made at a time of 
financial crisis. Chairman Troy said it was important to realize 
that the decision to limit the Amherst student body was not based 
solely on budgetary reasons. The impact of the campus on the 
surrounding community and other demographic matters had been con- 
sidered. 

Mr. Colby said he had been bothered for some time by 
the fact that in the planning process the Trustees always seemed 
to wind up between a rock and a hard place. The choices offered 
always seemed to be to do something one way and one way only or 
to stand and watch everything fail. He said the Trustees should 
be offered a greater range of options and their predicted results 
both pro and con. Chairman Troy said he felt this did happen on 
occasion, however at times the Trustees would perforce find them- 
selves between a rock and a hard place. Trustee Burack said she 
felt the problem was the delay in soliciting Trustee input into 
plans. She stressed that she was not seeking control of academic 
decisions, but that earlier Trustee input would inject some real- 
ity into what could at times become a very unreal set of plans. 
She said she felt the present system vitiated the true role of a 
lay board of trustees of a public institution. 

Chairman Troy then called for action on the first two 
items on the agenda. It was moved and seconded and unanimously 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board concur in the 
award of tenure by the President to Martin 
Posner, Associate Professor of Physics at 
the University of Massachusetts at Boston. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board concur in the 

appointment by the President of Dr. Stanley 
Walzer as Professor of Psychiatry with tenure 
at the University of Massachusetts at Worcester, 
as set forth in Doc. T77-080. 

The meeting then turned to the third item on the agenda 
Change of Departmental Title to Department of Aerospace Studies — 
UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-079). Mr. Lynton said departments similar 
to the University of Massachusetts Department of Air Science had, 
some years ago, dropped the Air and donned the Aerospace. In 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

order to avoid confusion with the Department of Mechanical and 
Aerospace Engineering, this had not been done at Amherst. The 
latter department had changed its title to the Department of 
Mechanical Engineering. This eliminated the nominal conflict. 
Trustee Cronin said the Committee should know that the Department 
of Air Science was well known for seeking student involvement in 
its program. It was one department where students had full ac- 
cess to teacher evaluation forms. He felt the department should 
be commended for this policy. There was no further discussion, 
and it was moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

redesignate the Department of Air Science 
in the Division of Military and Air Science 
at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst 
as the Department of Aerospace Studies, as 
set forth in Doc. T77-079. 

Chairman Troy then turned to the last item on the 
agenda, Basic Education — UM/Amherst and UM/Boston. He said the 
representatives from Amherst had been unable to attend the meet- 
ing because of the inclement weather, therefore the meeting would 
only discuss the situation at the Boston campus. Mr. Lynton said 
'both the Amherst and Boston campuses, in response to Trustee con- 
cern, had prepared reports dealing with student literacy and, to 
a lesser degree, numeracy. While the Boston report dealt mainly 
with remedial actions, Mr. Steamer and members of the faculty 
present at the meeting were prepared to discuss any aspect of the 
matter. Chairman Troy suggested that the discussion, for the 
sake of clarity, focus on English. Mathematics could be dealt 
with later. 

Mr. Steamer said he would give a brief introduction and 
then ask the faculty members to give a more detailed description 
of the situation at each of the colleges. Several years ago UM/ 
Boston, he continued, had made a conscious decision to decentral- 
ize certain student support services. Each college did its own 
tutoring, advising, remedial work and counseling, and each of 
these functions, where necessary, was integrated with the curric- 
ulum and the instructional program. He said approximately 
$300,000 per year was devoted to these functions at the basic 
level. He noted that Mr. Wittes had established the Learning 
Center at the College of Liberal Arts and asked him to describe 
the operation. 

Mr. Wittes said a number of students in the College of 
Liberal Arts arrived with a multiplicity of problems. The prob- 
lems range from academic disabilities to interpersonal conflicts, 
personal problems, lack of self-esteem and lack of career goals. 
All of these affect the student's ability to perform and the 
Learning Center addresses the entire range of problems. The 
Center is organized into three divisions — skills instruction, 
academic advising and personal counseling. In skill instruction, 



> ^y Jkl J 



3^83 



F&EP Coram. 
3/23/77 

UM/Amherst — 
Change of 
Departmental 
Title to 
Department of 
Aerospace 
Studies 
(Doc. T77-079) 



-3- 



UM/Boston — 
Basic Education 



52S4 



F&EP Comm. 
3/23/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

there had been a moving away from remediation toward prevention 
of academic failure and early identification of students with 
problems and aid in solving those problems. This is to encourage 
students to stay in college. In the acquisition of academic 
skills, a developmental process is emphasized. Students are en- 
couraged to acquire self-dependency and self-sufficiency, both 
intellectually and personally. Programs are developed wherein 
basic skills instruction are integrated with ongoing course offer- 
ings. Also, there is a continuing effort to increase faculty 
participation in the development and delivery of academic support 
services. Students under supervision are utilized as tutors and 
a tutor training program has been established. All of the pro- 
grams of the Learning Center are geared to the particular semes- 
ter. 

There has been an increasing emphasis on computational 
skills, Mr. Wittes continued, and a faculty training program with 
instructors from the mathematics department who teach introductory 
courses has been instituted. This program, coupled with student 
tutor-led workshops, was in response to the needs of students witlji 
minimal computational skills. In response to Trustee Morgenthau's 
question, Mr. Wittes said that as SAT scores were unavailable for 
many students, every incoming student takes tests of the College '$ 
devising. The tests assure the students' verbal, mathematical 
and cognitive abilities. After the test results are available, 
a conference with the student, an academic advisor, and staff 
from the Center determines which courses and programs would most 
benefit the student. The process has the additional benefit of 
acquainting the student of his strengths and weaknesses at an 
early stage. One of the most effective of the tests is one which 
is scored by the student taking the test. This test helps over- 
come the problem of getting the student to accept his own needs 
and thus to confront them. 

Trustee Burack said she did not see how Mr. Wittes' 
statements could be reconciled with the oft cited fact that stu- 
dents who graduate from college are deficient in verbal and 
mathematical skills. She said what had been described smacked 
of treating students as patients. It was her belief that all stu- 
dents needed verbal and written skills. At the Chairman's re- 
quest, Mr. Hart spoke to this point. He said that he could best 
reply by answering what were to him three important questions. 
First, what problem or problems were involved, and what was the 
scope thereof. Second, what was being done to solve the problems 
and how effective were the solutions. Last, what more should and 
could be done. 

Mr. Hart said in answer to the first question, informa- 
tion concerning admissions and/or diagnostic test score results 
from a number of institutions was being correlated with the 
results of the English Department's own placement writing test 
evaluation and with college course grades. Additionally, he had 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

surveyed faculty members who teach significant numbers of fresh- 
men in all academic departments at the College of Liberal Arts. 
The surveys and studies mentioned allowed some tentative infer- 
ences. The problem, at least at UM/Boston, was serious, he said, 
but not as serious as the media would lead one to believe. There 
was disagreement among the UM/Boston faculty as to whether or not 
the problem had worsened in the last five or six years; the major- 
ity believed it had not. Although test scores may have gone down 
the students' level of writing skill, in the Faculty's opinion, 
has not worsened. He stressed that this did not mean the level 
wasn't a low one; it simply meant it had not declined. 

Mr, Hart said the test scores of incoming freshmen, 
usually very low scores, analyzed in conjunction with the results 
of the College of Liberal Arts' own writing placement exam, an 
extremely difficult essay test graded by senior faculty, indicatec. 
that 15 percent of the freshmen needed remedial help. Students 
who need a course in English as a second language were not in- 
cluded in the survey. Trustee Morgenthau asked if the writing 
placement exam was an attempt to remedy some of the faults of 
the national test. Mr. Hart said this was one reason for the 
test, the assumption being that to judge a student's writing 
ability, one analyzed and evaluated the student's writing. The 
faculty did not shun diagnostic tests, he said, but felt both 
kinds of tests were indicative. The faculty as a whole, after 
having worked with the freshmen for a number of months, felt the 
placement was about 85 percent accurate. He said that since this 
was the first year in which this process had operated, this was 
seen as an acceptable performance. 

Students in the remedial classes, Mr. Hart continued, 
improve at a frustratingly slow pace. There were many reasons 
for this but the main one was that so many things were done si- 
multaneously and, unfortunately, they had to be done this way. 
The problems were in grammar, syntax, spelling, usage, punctua- 
tion, etc. Mr. Hart agreed with Trustee Morgenthau that one of 
the main problems was lack of motivation. In the fall of 1976, 
150 students had registered in the remedial course, at the end 
of the semester, 130 were still registered. Of these, 73 percent 
received grades of C or better. Mr. Hart stressed that the 
course, given by senior faculty, was a rigorous one as was the 
grading. The classes meet for three one-hour sessions per week, 
and each student has three individual conferences with the in- 
structor during the semester. Additionally, there are student 
tutors. Students write one outside paper every ten days. The 
emphasis is on basic writing, and at times the written work is 
based on reading. The reading assigned is chosen because it can 
be used as a model of what is expected of the students in their 
written compositions. The average per class enrollment has 
grown from a workable 19 or 20 to 22 to 23. Chairman Troy asked 
if there was a referral system within the college, wherein an in- 
structor in a discipline other than English could alert the Eng- 



F&EP Comm. 
3/23/77 



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F&EP Comm. 
3/23/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

lish Department about a student in need of help. Mr, Hart said 
there were plans to establish a writing clinic and the plans in- 
cluded a formal referral system; at present there is an informal 
system. 

In response to Trustee Breyer's question, Mr. Hart said 
the English Department staff totalled about 50 FTE. Sixty-five 
sections of freshmen English classes, both regular and remedial, 
were currently being offered by 50 instructors. Assuming that 
there were no cutbacks in the coming year, it was projected that 
70 such sections would be offered in September of 1977. This 
would constitute about 50 percent of faculty time devoted to 
teaching freshman English. 

Trustee Morgenthau asked how the department was kept 
refreshed, working under such a load. Mr. Hart replied that they 
were not being kept refreshed and the teaching was demoralizing 
and exhausting, and the department had a deep ambivalance to the 
program. While it was the most important thing the department 
did, it was also the most exhausting. The demoralizing aspect of 
the job stemmed from the fact that it was not a very stimulating 
activity. In the process of teaching students to write, there 
was the possibility that one would forget how to write oneself, 
and often how to read. It was not in one's subject field and 
not intellectually lively. On the other hand, it also had more 
genuine satisfaction than any other kind of teaching. 

Trustee Burack said she interpreted this to mean that 
there was not a total commitment on the part of the elitist group 
in the English Department. This statement met with considerable 
disagreement from the meeting. Chairman Troy said that he had 
taught such courses over a 25-year period and they were exhaust- 
ing and tiring and, at the same time rewarding. He said one 
could be dishonest about it and say it was the greatest thing 
in the world. It was not the greatest thing in the world; it 
was, however, a necessary, vitally important thing. Trustee 
Burack said she did not wish to be misunderstood, but in a Uni- 
versity newspaper she had read that the Chairman of the English 
Department at Amherst had said there was an enormous resistance 
on the part of faculty in the English Department to teach the 
composition course. She said information in other media indicates 
this was a national pattern. Mr. Hart said the situation did not 
exist at UM/Boston. 

Chairman Troy stated that everything said at the meet- 
ing and reported by the Boston Campus indicated that the faculty 
was doing a very good job. In his experience, Mr. Hart said, 
the Boston Campus was unique. The faculty members before being 
hired were aware that the teaching of remedial English was re- 
quired, as was the necessary dedication. He asked leave to gloss 
the word "demoralizing." The process is demoralizing because 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

improvement is so slow and so slight. As Mr. Wittes had pointed 
out, the students arrived with more problems and in more areas 
than he (Mr. Hart) had encountered anywhere else in his teaching 
life. Teaching freshmen English had become a form of counseling. 
Trustee Morgenthau pointed out that professors in English depart- 
ments saw resources devoted to programs not as useful, not as 
helpful and not as directly related to the educational mission 
of the University as was teaching students to communicate, and 
this would seem to be a contributor to demoralization. Mrs. 
Bluestone said the English Department was to be particularly com- 
mended for continuing to keep the senior faculty involved. Trus- 
tee Burack said this had impressed her. 

Chairman Troy asked the representative of the College 
of Professional Studies to speak. Ms. Watson said basic educa- 
tion at the College of Professional Studies was predicated on 
several principles. First, it was assumed that commuting students 
would need a service that might not be necessary on a residential 
campus. As students at the College of Professional Studies are 
on campus for a comparatively short period, it was felt necessary 
to tie support services and basic skills instruction as closely 
as possible to the courses in which the students were enrolled 
rather than establish a separate learning center or offer special 
courses. It was also assumed that commuting students would not 
have the kind of peer support found at residential colleges. 
Therefore services were tailored to the needs of the individual 
student. This process requires great efforts from the staff and 
the students but helps promise of greater success than more conver 
tional processes. Finally, it was assumed that it would be nec- 
essary to couple skills instruction to an over all self-assessment 
process. Each student was responsible for developing his own 
academic program. Since the function of the College was to train 
managers, the staff believed that a student who could not manage 
his own college career would probably not make it in the "real 
world." Developing an individual academic plan was one of the 
requirements for graduation. 

There is an essential skills proficiency requirement, 
Ms. Watson continued, wherein the students are required to demon- I 
strate proficiency in five areas — oral and written communication, 
reading, quantitative methods and critical thought. The process 
of helping students to meet the requirement begins with diagnostic, 
placement tests which are given to each new student, whether 
freshman or transfer. There are approximately 200 new students 
each year, these students are divided into groups of 20 people 
for purposes of testing and orientation. From this program stu- 
dents are aware of their strengths and weaknesses and can begin 
to make sensible course selections. 

After the orientation period is complete, students enter 
a stage called "content linked essential skills experience," 
where the students come to realize that essential skills are part 



F&EP Coram. 
3/23/77 



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EJB 






88 



F&EP Comm. 
3/23/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of any academic course. In answer to Chairman Troy's question, 
Ms. Watson said the amount of writing required varied from course 
to course, but all students did write a substantial amount. Most 
writing was based on a casework approach where students analyzed 
and described typical management problems and operations. She 
said the College had been fortunate in that the present faculty 
had designed the curriculum and that they had always been aware 
of the need to mesh skills development into each course. In re- 
cruiting new faculty, a consideration was the applicant's dedica- 
tion to this approach. 

Trustee Burack asked if the staff was large enough to 
perform the many functions. Ms. Watson said the College's staff 
was smaller, relative to the size of the student body, than that 
of the other UM/Boston Colleges. Each faculty member has a very 
large advising load and there is a small professional counseling/ 
advising staff. Also, the College utilizes resources available 
elsewhere in the University, for example, English and math courses 
are taught by members of the College of Liberal Arts staff. One 
such course, called "Communications," at present dealt almost ex- 
clusively with written and oral communications; however, experi- 
ence had shown that students in the course also needed to develop 
analytical skills, and because of this the emphasis of the course 
was being reviewed. 

Trustee Breyer asked for clarification of the relation- 
ship between the English Department and the Learning Center. Mr. 
Wittes said that the freshman English courses emphasized writing 
as a general skill. Some students in addition to developing this 
general skill also needed help in developing the writing skill 
necessary to a particular discipline. This help was available 
through an adjunct program. Courses in the adjunct program would 
for example, focus on the writing skills peculiar to sociology or 
history. 

Mr. Hart said the Trustees should know that 50 percent 
of the students who graduated were transfer students. Frequently 
students enrolled with credits in English without possessing the 
skills that these credits implied. There was at present no forma!, 
mechanism to identify these students and to urge them to take 
the courses they needed. There was a referral system; however, 
if all these students opted for the intermediate course most of 
them needed, there would not be sufficient staff to man the sec- 
tions of the course. In response to Trustee Burack' s question, 
Ms. Watson said transfer students at the College of Professional 
Studies were given diagnostic tests on enrolling. Mr. Wittes 
said the College of Liberal Arts was moving in that direction. 
In response to Trustee Burack' s further question, Mr. Hart said 
the greatest frustration of the program at the College of Liberal 
Arts stemmed from the students' belief that they did not have 
sufficient time to devote to the program. He said he did not 
know if this belief was based on actualities, but he felt there 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

was need for a way to oblige students to take advantage of what 
was offered. Mrs. Bluestone asked if there was any effort made 
to contact colleagues in the secondary school system and inform 
them that their students were not being adequately prepared for 
the University. Chairman Troy pointed out that when UM/ Amherst 
was the Massachusetts Agricultural College, high schools were 
informed by the English Department on a case by case basis that 
students arrived from high school unprepared. There was general 
agreement that this policy had its attractions. 

Trustee Breyer said the discussion had raised issues 
which clearly should be part of the planning process. He asked 
if this was being done. Mr. Lynton said this was being accom- 
plished by means of the departmental analyses of demands and the 
allocation of resources. 

Chairman Troy said that time constraints had not permit- 
ted discussion of basic education at the College of Public and 
Community Services. He noted that the Amherst contingent would 
be asked to appear at the Committee's next meeting to discuss the 
same subject. He asked the Boston contingent if they could also 
attend that meeting to discuss the College of Public and Community 
Services program and any other related matters that needed elabo- 
ration. They agreed to do this. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit- 
tee, and at 12:35 the meeting was adjourned. 



*JJ#w 



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F&EP Comm. 
3/23/77 




Dorothy Eighel 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

April 6, 1977; 11:00 a.m. 
Private Dining Rooms A, B & C 
University of Massachusetts /Worcester 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Clark, Gordon, Robertson, Shearer, Spiller and 
Troy; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Committee Members Absent : Trustee Rowland 

Other Trustees : Trustees Baker, Batiste, Breyer, Burack, Crain, 
Eddy, Marks, McNeil, McNulty, Morgenthau; Mr. Callahan represent- 
ing Trustee Anrig; Secretary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis; 
Ms. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for University Polic) 
Counsels Bench and D'Esti 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Professor Sulzner, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Rep- 
resentative 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs 

Guests : Mmes . Pinck and Shukri, Executive Office of Educational 
Affairs; Mr. Hite, Co-President, Student Government Association, 
UM/Amherst 

Chairman Healey called the meeting to order at 11:15 
a.m. He said he wished to propose that the meeting begin with 
an executive session. The executive session was necessary to dis- 
cuss and act upon a personnel action in the President's Office; 
at their request, to hear statements from Paul F. Quirk, Co-Chair 
man of the Public Employees Legislative Conference and President 
of Local 509 of the SEIU, Professor Larry S. Roberts of UM/Amherst 
and Professor Eric Chester of UM/Boston representing the faculty 
union; and to discuss Trustee Spiller' s letter of March 4, 1977 
to the Chairman concerning the organization and operations of the 
Board. He recommended that the meeting enter executive session. 
At 11:21 a.m., on a roll call vote, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To enter into executive session. 

At 1:24 p.m., it was unanimously 






VOTED: To end the executive session 



Executive 
Session 






1,2,32 



Exec. Coiran. 
4/6/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Due to the lateness of the hour, the Chairman received 
the consent of the Committee to refer the other items on the agendja 
directly to the meeting of the Board of Trustees called for 2:00 
p.m. for its action. The meeting was adjourned at 1:25 p.m. 



/jGlady^J Keith Hardy <* 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

April 14, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Trustees Baker, Batiste, Crain 
and McNeil; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Other Trustees: Trustee Gordon 



Committee Members Absent: Chairman Shearer; Trustees Anrig, 



Morgenthau and Okin 

Office of the President: Ms. Simmons, Assistant Vice President 



for Academic Affairs 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student Af- 
fairs; Mr. Bischoff, Associate Provost 

UM/Boston : Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; 
Mr. Tubbs , Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Mr. James, Assist- 
ant Chancellor 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Keene, Bursar 



Guest: Mr. Fields, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



-n*?* 



5293 



In the absence of Chairman Shearer, Trustee McNeil as- 
sumed the chair and called the meeting to order at 10:15 a.m. 
She asked leave to exercise a Chairman's privilege and introduced 
Item 3 on the agenda, Athletic Tuition Waivers — UM/Amherst (Doc. 
T77-086) since Trustee Gordon had come to the meeting to speak 
about the proposal. She noted that the document had not been 
sent to the Trustees prior to the meeting. She called on Ms. Sim- 
mons to present the item. Ms. Simmons said that the budgetary 
situation of the past years had had a grave impact on the inter- 
collegiate athletic program at Amherst in general and on football 
in particular. There was general agreement on campus that the 
program was necessary, but funding of both the men's and women's 
athletic program was dependent on the receipts generated mainly 
by the football teams, and therefore it is recommended that the 
football team be strengthened in ways which would not impact di- 
rectly on the budget. The proposed tuition waivers would be one 
of the ways to accomplish this. Ms. Simmons noted that there was 
strong alumni backing for the proposal and that they had promised 
to increase their financial support if the program was instituted. 

Before calling on campus representatives to present the 
reasons for the recommendation, Chairman McNeil invited Trustee 
Gordon to speak to the proposal. Trustee Gordon said the Board 
had been concerned about the fate of the athletic program since 



UM/Amherst — 
Athletic 
Tuition Waivers 
(Doc. T77-086) 



v.5 ' 



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4/14/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

1972 and had an Ad Hoc Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 
which he chaired. In 1960 the Board voted that the intercolle- 
giate athletic program should be at least competitive with the 
best in New England, but he stressed that the Board's intent had 
never been to get into big time athletics. He said it was nec- 
essary to re-examine the sources of support for the athletic pro- 
gram because of the increase in costs, the enlargement of the 
women's athletic program, and the depletion of grants-in-aid 
funding. There was less support, in terms of hard dollars, now 
than in 1972. 

The tuition waiver program, Trustee Gordon continued, 
would not solve all the problems but it would help improve the 
athletic program as a whole, as well as enabling the University 
to maintain a football program. He noted that there was a real 
possibility that the football program might not survive. The 
proposed support for football was smaller by far than that afford- 
ed by the University's athletic opponents— New Hampshire is 50 
percent greater; Connecticut is 60 percent higher; those of Rutgerls 
Boston College and Harvard are "out of sight." 

Trustee Gordon reminded the Committee that the Massachu-' 
setts-Harvard game had been on regional television in the fall of 
1976 and there was a good chance that Massachusetts would do this 
again in 1977. Such appearances generated enormous revenues. 
These revenues were used to support the overall athletic program, 
not just the football team. The tuition waiver proposal, he con- 
tinued, was one part of the effort to improve the intercollegiate 
athletic program. 

Trustee Gordon said the University should decide either 
to play football or not to do so, and the consequences of choosing 
the latter would bring detriment to all other sports since it was 
a source of revenue for the rest. He said the Trustees, particu- 
larly the new Trustees, were perhaps not aware that the matter 
had been thoroughly, even agonizingly, studied over a five-year 
period, and he heartily endorsed the proposal. 

Trustee Crain said that when he was in college he had 
received a football scholarship and for this reason was sympathetic 
to the proposal; however, he could not understand why the Commit- 
tee was being asked to act on a complex proposal on such short 
notice. He noted that Chancellor Bromery's recommendation was datied 
January 20, 1977 and asked where the proposal had been since that 
time. Trustee Gordon said that at the last Board meeting he had 
reminded the Trustees that there was a backlog of agenda items 
awaiting action by Committees and the Board. The athletic tuitior 
waivers proposal had been deemed of less import than other items 
awaiting action by the Student Affairs Committee and had been 
shunted aside until this meeting. He said he had been trying for 
some time to have the Committee deal with this matter and that 
action was needed now if the proposal was to have any impact on 
the next academic year. 



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Trustee Crain said he understood this, but if there was 
a desire and a need to make efficient use of meeting time, then 
support materials should be in the hands of Trustees well before 
the time for action. He said that if he were to be given the in- 
puts necessary to make an intelligent vote on the proposal, he 
would monopolize an hour and a half of the time of the meeting. 
He was not willing to do this. Trustee Crain said his frustration 
stemmed from the fact that apparently the documentation had been 
available since January and was only available to the Trustees on 
the day action was expected. This method of operation, he said, 
was beyond his understanding. 

Trustee Gordon said he could neither explain nor excuse 
the delay but he felt it important to note that there was an in- 
creasing dialogue between the Board and the Alumni Association. 
One result of this was that annual giving had grown from practica 
ly nothing to a respectable figure. Also, there had been suggest- 
ed programs; for example, a job skills bank of graduates and a 
number of fund-raising options. Because of these many activities, 
a situation had developed where it was not clear as to whose turn 
it was to move. Everyone was expecting some action from someone 
else. In any event, it had been decided to put the tuition waiver 
proposal on today's agenda. Trustee Crain said that he felt he 
had to do his homework before he could act on what was a complex 
issue. 

Chairman McNeil called for further discussion of the 
proposal. Mr. Bischoff said that athletics at UM/Amherst had be- 
come prototypical for a number of other institutions in that ath- 
letic programs are part of the educational program and are under 
the control and supervision of academic affairs as opposed to 
being a separate entity. The whole issue of scholarships and 
grants-in-aid for athletes was a controversial one. However, if 
the University was to meet the mandate of the Board's 1960 vote 
to be competitive in athletics, then aid of some sort would have 
to be developed. He said money for athletic programs at Amherst 
did not come from the state or from student fees — it came from 
ticket sales, television revenues, etc. While the money supporter 
a broad spectrum of women's and men's athletics, almost all of it 
came from men's basketball and football. If these did not continue 
to earn money, the whole intercollegiate, athletic program would 
have to be drastically reduced. At present, fourteen programs 
were funded; without increased income, these would have to be re- 
duced to four — women's basketball and gymnastics and men's foot- 
ball and basketball. This the campus did not want to do. 

Trustee Batiste asked where the funds for the tuition 
waivers would come from and if the proposal was in compliance 
with the provisions of Title IX. Mr. Bischoff explained that 
tuition for student athletes would be waived and therefore the 
program would not require funding. The proposal, he said, does 
comply with Title IX but, he added, the law did not require total 






£S5 



Student Affairs 
4/14/77 



-3- 



Student Affairs 
4/14/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

uniformity between men's and women's athletics. 

Trustee Batiste noted that three years ago Residential 
Advisors had been denied tuition waivers and wondered why the 
Trustees were now being asked to grant waivers to athletics. She 
asked for clarification. Mr, Bischoff said consideration should 
be given to the fact that athletes made a very significant contri 
bution to the University and in so doing often denied themselves 
opportunities for employment while in school. The proposal, how- 
ever, was not exclusive and it did not mean that the University 
would not bring forward other recommendations for waivers; it was 
simply one proposal which had been developed and which the Chan- 
cellor had endorsed. 

Mr. Woodbury said that some time ago, there had been 
recognition that there had been an accretion of tuition waivers 
and that they were being awarded for a wide variety of reasons. 
In trying to bring the situation under control, Residential Ad- 
visors were among those excluded. He said he was studying the 
whole area of student aid and was developing proposals for the 
Provost and the Chancellor which would include considering broader 
categories of tuition waivers. He noted that many students con- 
tribute to the University and need special consideration. In 
response to Trustee Crain's comment, Secretary Hardy said the 
whole issue of tuition waivers had been reviewed two years ago 
which resulted in the Board vote on the Tuition Waiver Policy 
(Doc. T75-075C) , and, at that time, there were cases where the 
Trustees felt that payment was a better means of compensation 
than tuition waivers. 

There being no further discussion, Chairman McNeil asked 
the Committee if it would approve the proposed vote 

To recommend to the Committee on Budget 
and Finance that the Chancellor of UM/ 
Amherst be authorized to grant 210 under- 
graduate tuition waivers as outlined in 
Doc. T77-086. 

MOTION DENIED. 

Trustees Baker , Batiste and Crain voted against the proposed vote. 

Trustee Crain asked that the record show that his vote 
was in spite of a personal bias in favor of athletic scholarships 
and was due to the inability to research the subject since the 
support material was not made available until the meeting. He 
said he would be willing to consider the proposal at a later time 
after adequate study and additional documentation. Trustee Baker 
asked that the record show that her vote was based on a lack of 
documentation. 

The meeting then turned to the first item on the agenda 



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Student Fees — UM/Boston and UM/Worcester . Ms. Simmons said the 






;;o", 



Boston campus was preparing an increase of $15 to mandatory fees, 
with an increase of $4, bringing the Health Service fee to $48, 
and two new fees — an Athletic and Recreation fee of $10 and an 
identification card fee of $1. In addition, Boston proposed an 
increase of $200 in the Year of Study in France fee, to a total 
of $2,500; an increase of $15 in the Graduate Student Summer Ses- 
sion per credit hour fee, to a total of $40, and a $20 increase 
in the Late Registration fee, bringing it to $25. The Boston cam- 
pus was also recommending the continuation of the mandatory Health 
Service fee for part-time students. Ms. Simmons concluded by 
recommending that the fees be adopted and forwarded to the Commit- 
tee on Budget and Finance for its appropriate action. 

Mr. Tubbs said the proposed increase in the Health Serv- 
ice fee was meant to cover the cost-of-living increase recently 
granted to state employees , it did not include any programmatic 
changes. Some $26,000 to $30,000 was needed to cover the cost-of- 
living increases and there were no reserves available to meet this 
obligation. Experience had shown that the mandatory Health Serv- 
ice fee for part-time students was necessary and he recommended 
that this be continued. Part-time students, he said, apparently 
used the Service as heavily as full-time students and this then 
raised the question as to whether the former should be charged 
the full fee. The campus would report to the Trustees on this 
matter at a later date. 

There were conflicting reports about student support 
for the Athletic and Recreation fee, Mr. Tubbs continued. In a 
referendum, 53 percent of the students voted against such a fee; 
a petition circulated by the student government showed an equal 
number of students for the fee. The Identity Card fee was neces- 
sary to cover costs of producing the cards. The proposed optiona] 
summer fee for Health Services for students at Boston gave the 
same options as those at Amherst. 

Trustee Baker said the Athletic and Recreational fee, 
as Mr. Tubbs had pointed out, was controversial. Some students 
were opposed to such fees as a matter of principle. Other student!! 
felt the fee was unfair, as only a portion of the students partic- 
ipated. She pointed out that a number of students supported the 
fee. Trustee Crain said that on a recent visit to the Boston cam- 
pus he had spent some time with the Student Affairs Committee. 
He said much of the discussion had centered on the Athletic fee, 
and the articulateness and support for the fee of the S.A.C. mem- 
bers, plus the results of the petition, had convinced him that 
this was a valid fee. In response to Trustee Crain' s question, 
Mr. Tubbs said the proposal for a Compulsory Health Fee for Foreign 
Students had been withdrawn. 

There being no further discussion, it was moved and 
seconded and unanimously 



Student Affairs 
4/14/77 

UM/Boston — 
UM/Worcester — 
Student Fees 



-5- 



£98 



Student Affairs 
4/14/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Committee on Budget 
and Finance that all part-time graduate 
and undergraduate students at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Boston be required 
to pay a health service fee in the amount 
of 50 percent of the health service fee 
required of full-time students; further, 
that full-time graduate students be required 
to pay the same health service fee required 
of full-time undergraduate students. The 
Chancellor of the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston shall be and is hereby authorized 
in extraordinary cases to waive the fee to 
be paid by part-time graduate and undergraduate 
students at his discretion. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Committee on Budget 
and Finance approve the new fees and fee 
increases proposed by UM/Boston, outlined 
in Doc. T77-085, with the exception of the 
Compulsory Health Insurance Fee for Foreign 
Students . 



The meeting then turned to Student Fees at UM/Worcester . 
Ms. Simmons said Worcester was proposing increases in rents aver- 
aging $35, and an increase of $30, to a total of $100 in the Stu- 
dent Health fee, and expansion of possible uses but not an increase 
of the Equipment fee to cover services and supplies of the Student 
Government . 



Mr. Keene said that when the Housing Trust was estab- 
lished and rental fees had been set the School had no real means 
of knowing what the actual cost of operating the three houses 
would be. These costs had now been determined and the proposed 
increases were designed to cover actual operating costs. In 1978 
a cash balance of some $22,000 was anticipated. This would be 
used for capital improvements such as insulation, storm windows, 
boiler repairs and roofing. The students had agreed to the in- 
creases. 

The Health Service fee increase, Mr. Keene continued, 
would provide for a full-time nurse practitioner, a clerk and a 
part-time physician director. This service would be available to 
participating students and their dependents. 

There being no further discussion, it was moved, second 
ed and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Committee on Budget 

and Finance approve the increased schedules 
of rental fees for the housing program pro- 
vided through the Housing Trust Fund at the 



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University of Massachusetts at Worcester; 
provided , that rents for unfurnished, single 
rooms shall range from $70 to $90; for 
furnished, single rooms from $80 to $100; 
and for one bedroom apartments from $163 to 
$173; in accordance with the value-point 
system in effect in the housing program. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Committee on Budget 

and Finance approve a Student Health Service 
Fee of $100 per student, with an additional 
fee of $75 to cover all dependents of a 
student at the University of Massachusetts 
at Worcester. 



The meeting then turned to the next item on the agenda, UM/Boston — 



'■iJfr'jCtajtt 



Student Affairs 
4/14/77 



Fee-based Summer Session — UM/Boston. Ms. Simmons said the Board 



Fee-based 



had approved the establishment of a trust fund to implement a fee^ Summer Session 

based Summer Session at Boston. The approval was given with the 

understanding that a report on the results of the program would 

be forthcoming. The report was made and the program considered 

successful. A majority of students felt the fees were fair and 

an even greater majority (83 percent) rated the summer session 

"good to excellent." An analysis of the student body showed that 

most students were nontraditional. 

Mr. Steamer said the summer session in 1975 was the last 
such session which was funded from the 03 account. That session 
offered 43 courses. In 1976, the first fee-assisted summer ses- 
sion was held. Eighty-seven courses were offered and 1317 students, 
of whom just under 10 percent were from other universities, were 
enrolled. In 1977, 110 courses, including for the first time 
graduate classes, will be offered and some 2,000 students are ex- 
pected. A survey had been made which asked students what courses 
they wanted to take. This was different from the sometimes used 
practice of making jobs for faculty members. 

Summer sessions, Mr. Steamer continued, were among the 
University's more successful enterprises. Mr. Woodbury pointed 
out that the Boston summer sessions were very similar to those at 
Amherst — the same fees, same structure, etc. In answer to a ques- 
tion, Mr. Steamer said that there were a few classes offered in 
the evening, as were cultural events. The latter had also been 
successful and a greater number would be offered in 1977. He 
noted that the entire summer session was self-supporting. He 
then distributed copies of the 1977 Summer Session catalog, which 
had been produced by in-house Point Press, a student-run operatior 
at Columbia Point. Admiration for a job well done was expressed 
by all. 

The meeting then turned to the next item on the agenda, 
Reports on Placement. Chairman McNeil noted the lateness of the 



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4/14/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

hour and suggested that discussion of the reports submitted by 
each of the campuses be held after the Trustees had studied the 
reports . 

There was no further business to come before the Commit- 
tee and the meeting was adjourned at 11:50 a.m. 



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.adys VBteith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

April 20, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 
Trustees Gordon, Rowland, Spiller, Troy; Secretary Hardy; Treas- 
urer Johnson; Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustees Dennis and Marks 



Other Trustees: Trustee Batiste 



Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Ms. Hanson, Assistant Vice President and Budget Director; 
Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for University Policy; Ms. 
Simmons, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chan- 



cellor for Student Affairs; Mr. Beatty, Assistant Director for 
Budget and Instututional Studies; Mr. Federow, Graduate Student 
Senate Representative; Mr. Fisher, Treasurer, Graduate Student 
Senate; Mr. Martus, past President, Student Government Associatior 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Mr. James, Assistant Chancellor 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor for 
Administration and Finance; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Mr. Fellner, 
Assistant Controller; Mr. Ference, Group Practice Administrator; 
Professor Smith, Faculty Representative 

Guests : Mr. Wood of Standish, Ayer & Wood; Mr. Flynn of Arthur 



Young & Company; Mr. Miller of Wyatt Company; Messrs. Powell and 
Christiansen of Ernst & Ernst; Ms. Shukri of the Executive Office 
of Educational Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 10:10 a.m. by Chair- 
man Carlson. At the request of the Chairman, President Wood com- 
mented on the current status of funding for the University. He 
said that testimony had been given at a hearing of the House Ways 
and Means Committee on Thursday, and that the only questions 
raised concerning the University were with regard to the admission's 
process at the UM/Worcester Medical School, collective bargaining, 
the proposal for modest graduate programs at UM/Boston and the 
status of the physical education building, also at UM/Boston. 

With regard to the implementation of the Trustee actions 



President's 
Comments 



"5302 



B&F Comm. 
4/20/77 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

concerning cost-of-living adjustments and other compensation, 
President Wood said Chairman Healey, Chancellor Bromery , he and 
representatives from the other segments of public higher education 
had met in an informal session with Ways and Means members of the 
House and Secretary Buckley on April 14 and had at that time dis- 
cussed changes necessary in two pieces of legislation. The first, 
he said, was an amendment to the cost-of-living bill submitted by 
the Governor and the other concerned the allocation of last year's 
appropriation act which earmarked $32 million for additional com- 
pensation to state employees. After the meeting with Ways and 
Means, he said, the professional staffs of the public higher educa 
tion segments met on the following Monday to discuss how to deal 
with unfunded contracts. 

President Wood said the next matter of concern was the 
request for an FY 1977 deficiency appropriation for the University 
Hospital. He reported that meetings had taken place with Chancel- 
lor Bulger, his staff and Secretary Buckley to discuss the situa- 
tion. He added that the Governor had submitted his deficiency 
budget to House Ways and Means for their consideration. 

The fourth matter of concern, he said, was the establish 
ment of a trust fund for FY 1978 for the University Hospital, and 
staff work on legislation for this was proceeding. A way must be 
found to provide basic flexibility between revenues and costs. He 
said it was difficult to explain the present situation to the 
public; all revenues are returned to the Commonwealth while all 
costs are borne by the University. 

In the area of good news, said President Wood, is the 
fact that the Department of Health, Education and Welfare has re- 
considered the certification date for the opening of the Hospital 
back to January, 1976, a decision which will return some $400,000 
in additional funds from third-party payers to the Commonwealth. 
Also, Secretary Parks has concurred with the need for increasing 
the FY 1978 Hospital budget and has stated his recommendation for 
$16.8 million. 

Chairman Carlson turned at the conclusion of the Presi- 
dent's remarks to the first item of agenda, the Report of Invest- 
ment Counsel , asking John Wood of Standish, Ayer & Wood to speak. 
Mr. Wood circulated an appraisal of the Endowment portfolio as of 
April 1, noting that the equity ratio of 62.8 percent was within 
the Trustee policy guidelines, but expressing his view that it 
should be closer to 65 than to 60 percent. He said that approxi- 
mately $20,000 was available for investment and proposed the pur- 
chase of stock as detailed in Doc. T77-092. He added that income 
continues to rise. 

Trustee Rowland asked to what use the income from the 
Endowment Fund was put, since she wondered whether it might not be 
wise to increase the bond ratio for the purpose of maximizing 



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B&F Comm. 
4/20/77 



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income rather than growth. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the use of the income for 
the most part is restricted to scholarship funds. Some endowments, 
he said, were given for prizes of various types and some, such as 
the Murray D. Lincoln fund, were unrestricted. 

In response to Chairman Carlson's request for his opin- 
ion, Trustee Spiller said that he agreed with Mr. Wood in that it 
was necessary to hold to the 60^-65 percent stock position in orde:: 
to keep up with inflationary costs. Trustee Batiste asked if the 
vote on investments could be delayed until after the discussion 
on South African investments. Chairman Carlson said he had given 
this consideration, but felt that since the resolution of the 
South African investments would require time, he felt it was wise 
not to tie the hands of investment counsel in the interim. It 
was then on motion made and seconded 

VOTED : To authorize and empower the Treasurer of 
the University, Kenneth W. Johnson, to 
execute the purchase of securities for the 
Endowment Fund Portfolio as contained in 
Doc. T77-092. 

President Wood abstained from the vote. 

Chairman Carlson turned next to the Review of Invest- 
ments in Corporations Operating in South Africa with Relation to 
University Investment Guidelines. At the request of the Chairman! in Corporations 



Review of 
Investments 



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Treasurer Johnson reported on the steps he had taken to collect 
information with regard to those firms operating in South Africa 
in which the University has an interest. He said he had reports 
of the Investors' Responsibility Research Center, the annual re- 
ports of the companies in question, their proxy statements and 
annual meeting materials, Standard & Poor's fact sheets. He had 
written to all the firms doing business in South Africa in which 
the University had investments, asking them to submit specific 
information. To date, he had received one reply, from AMAX. Vic& 
President Simmons, he said, was also collecting information, as 
were the students. He said he had also asked John Wood to provide 
information. He said it would take some time to collect and eval- 
uate data from each of the companies contacted in order to respond 
in a responsible way to the concerns expressed by the students. 



Chairman Carlson then recognized Jay Martus, who request- 
ed that when considering investments in South Africa, the compa- 
nies operating in Southwest Africa also be included, since this 
protectorate subscribes to the same racial policies. He said 
that the contract labor used by the mining industries was even 
more exploited than manufacturing labor. He added that he approved 
of the firm-by-firm approach taken by the Treasurer. 



Operating in 
South Africa 



-3- 



o«; 



04 



B&F Comm. 
4/20/77 



New Fees and 
Fee Increases 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Wood said that at the request of Treasurer Johnson, 
he had contacted other universities to learn what data they had or 
the subject and had found that little data is available. He addec 
that he felt it would be difficult to obtain the kind of detailed 
data the students were seeking. Harvard, he said, had sent a 
graduate student to South Africa to collect such information, and 
he had returned after nine months with little success. 

Ms. Simmons said that she had found that while it is 
relatively easy to determine what corporations are operating in 
South Africa, it is nearly impossible to discover the extent of 
their operations there. Current information is difficult to get; 
for example, data from the U.S. Department of Commerce is for 
1966. 

Chairman Carlson said that this matter was of such com- 
plexity, it could not be dealt with by the Committee at its regu- 
lar meetings. Therefore, he felt it would be appropriate to name 
a subcommittee to look into this matter, develop criteria for 
judgment and make recommendations to the Committee. He suggested 
that this Committee be composed of the Treasurer, Trustee Batiste 
representing the students, and Trustees Dennis and Marks, from 
the Committee on Budget and Finance, subject to their acceptance 
of the appointment to the subcommittee. President Wood suggested 
that as the subcommittee develops guidelines it does so in 
the Context of the Board vote of April 6, 1977 and public policy 
posture on human rights in South Africa. He asked that the ab- 
sence of information not impair the subcommittee's best judgment 
on the issue. 

Trustee Spiller said it might be wise to seek the advic^ 
of counsel to ensure that in restricting investments the Univer- 
sity did not incur liability for use of endowments in ways other 
than the terms of the endowments would allow. Treasurer Johnson 
said that an opinion had been received from the Attorney General 
some time ago which stated that the Trustees had broad discretion 
in the investment of endowment funds, but that they are to be 
governed only by the "prudent man" concept. Trustee Spiller com- 
mented that this is a strict concept. 

Trustee Baker commented that she felt this was a signif 
icant moral issue of concern to all and stated her wish to presen 
documents signed by the students at UM/Boston indicating their 
concern with regard to this matter. 

Chairman Carlson said he hoped that a progress report 
from the subcommittee could be heard at the next meeting of the 
Committee on Budget and Finance, and Treasurer Johnson requested 
anyone who had information on the subject to forward it to him. 

Chairman Carlson then turned to the matter of New Fees 
and Fee Increases, noting that this year the approval of the fees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

had been separated from the approval of the fee-based budgets. 
At the request of the Chairman, Ms. Hanson, Budget Director, com- 
mented, indicating that most of the fee increases were the result 
of having to pass on the cost of the salary increases granted this 
year. She said attempts had been made in some cases to minimize 
the impact of the salary increases by spreading the cost over a 
two-year period. 

Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 
UM/Amherst, commented on the FY 1978 Proposed Fee Schedule for 
Revenue-based Activities — UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-053A) , saying that 



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much discussion had occurred on campus with the various governance 
bodies, especially with graduate and undergraduate senates. He 
said that in addition to Trustee Batiste, Jay Martus, past co- 
president of the undergraduate student senate and Dan Fisher and 
Michael Federow, treasurer and president of the graduate student 
senate, were on hand to answer any questions related to student 
attitudes regarding the proposed fee increases. 

Chairman Carlson asked that before discussion of the 
various fees ensued, Ms. Simmons report the reactions of the Com~ 
mittee on Student Affairs to the proposals before the Committee 
on Budget and Finance. Ms. Simmons said the Student Affairs Com- 
mittee after thorough discussion of the proposed increases at UM/ 
Amherst had been satisfied that the $116 increase resulting from 
cost-of-living adjustments and the $23 increase for programmatic 
changes were reasonable. UM/Boston increases of $4 due to cost- 
of-living adjustments and $11 for new fees had also met with the 
approval of the Committee. Ms. Simmons called attention to the 
fact that the Athletic and Recreation fee was $5 per semester 
rather than per year, making the total of the fee increase $15 
rather than $10 as indicated in the Chancellor's cover memorandum. 



Chairman Carlson asked for an explanation of the opera- 
tions analysis of the residence halls, asking if this was the 
study which was to go to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
for authorization. Mr. Beatty, UM/Amherst Assistant Director for . 
Budget and Institutional Studies, replied that this was a different 
type of study. The analysis mentioned in the fee document, he 
said, entailed a census of the residence halls and an analysis of 
the residents. The operational study, he said, would be brought 
to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds for review. 

Mr. Martus said that although he approved of the process 
by which the proposed fee increases were determined this year, he 
still did not think that the long-range implications of the fees 
had been adequately addressed. He said the students were concern- 
ed about the cost of the residence halls and approved of the fi- 
nancial audit which has been instituted to determine what the 
costs actually are. He said that with declining enrollments, the] 
per student cost for the maintenance of the residence hall system 
increases and he is concerned that the increased fees may eventual- 



-5- 



B&F Comm, 
4/20/77 



UM/Amherst — 
FY 1978 Pro- 
posed Fee 
Schedule for 
Revenue-based 
Activities 
(Doc. T77-053A) 



B&F Comm. 
4/20/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ly lead to fewer students enrolling. He said that if the tradi- 
tional students do not enroll in the freshmen class, then that toe 
erodes the income base, since it is the underclass men and women 
who live in the residence halls. Should students seek private 
housing in the area in greater numbers, that would compound the 
problem by inflating rental rates in the private sector. He 
stated his concern about the maintenance of and repairs to the 
buildings. He said some of the elevators require replacement. 

In addition to the residence hall quandry, he said, is 
the matter of the Campus Center, the funding of which has created 
severe cash-flow problems. He said there are problems in the food 
service area as well as the low usage in the garage; there are no 
rent producing entities within the Center. He suggested seeking 
state support and federal matching funds or federal grants to help 
alleviate these problems. The group of students hurt most by the 
rising fees, he said, were the middle income group who did not 
qualify for financial aid. 



Chairman Carlson said that he agreed this was a serious 
problem and noted further that it is one which is national in 
scope, but he did not think the Committee could resolve all the 
individual problems at this meeting. He asked Chancellor Bromery 
what steps were being taken on campus to alleviate this situation. 
Chancellor Bromery said that the campus was just now beginning to 
catch up on the problems of the residence halls caused by neglect 
in the past due to lack of funding. He said a hopeful sign was 
the inclusion of money for maintenance of the dormitories in the 
capital outlay budget submitted by the Governor to the Legislature*. 
He said capital outlay funds had never before been used for this 
purpose, and if the Legislature approves this funding, it may 
present a solution to this dilemma. 

Trustee Spiller agreed that cost escalation was a very 
serious problem, but that it was a problem not confined to the 
University. He said it had to be lived with on a day-to-day basis 
and he did not think it should be blown up out of proportion. 
Trustee Troy asked how serious the problem of elevator replacement 
was. Chancellor Bromery said it was a serious problem, and was nqt 
only a problem of maintenance but a problem of education of stu- 
dents. He said part of the problem was caused by the students in 
the improper treatment of the elevators. 

Chairman Carlson then asked for the approval of the new 
fees and fee increases, noting that action on the two new trust 
funds — namely, the Institute for Man & Environment Research Serv- 
ices Trust Fund and the Instructional Trust Fund — was being defer- 
red pending further review by University counsel. On motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve fee increases for UM/Amherst as 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

set forth in Doc. T77-053A with the 
exception of the proposed establishment 
of the IME Research Services Trust Fund 
and the Instructional Trust Fund 



It was also 



VOTED 



X.' 



J3Q7 



B&F Coram. 
4/20/77 



To recommend to the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority that the in- 
creases in the rates and charges for 
Building Authority projects on the 
Amherst campus be approved effective 
commencing with the beginning of the 
1977-78 academic year as detailed in the 
two-page schedule attached to these min- 
utes ; provided that said rates and 
charges are adopted by the Trustees at 
their meeting on May 4, 1977. 

(Note that the affected Building Authority 
projects include Residence Halls, Boarding 
Halls, the Campus Center and the Campus 
Center Garage.) 



Chairman Carlson asked Chancellor Golino to comment on 
the UM/Boston FY 1978 Proposed Fee Changes for Revenue Based 
Programs (Doc. T77-085) . Chancellor Golino said that Ms. Simmons 
had already indicated the increases in mandatory fees. The new 
fee for Athletics and Recreation, he said, had been intiated in 
response to a student demand for expanded recreational programs, 
and the Identification Picture fee was established because of nec- 
essity. Other fee increases, he said, were due to cost escalations 
Secretary Hardy added that in addition to recommending action on 
the new fees and fee increases, the campus had also proposed mak- 
ing permanent the health fee for part-time students which had beer 
approved by the Trustees in 1976 on a one-year trial basis. Trus- 
tee Baker said there had originally been some controversy on cam- 
pus regarding the Athletic Fee, but assurance that consultation 
with and approval of the Assembly, in conjunction with the Student 
Activities Committee, would be sought in the determination of how 
the fees would be used had satisfied the student body. 

There being no objections to the proposed fees, on 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve the new fees and fee increases 
proposed by UM/Boston, outlined in Doc. 
T77-085, with the exception of the 



UM/Boston — 
New Fees and 
Fee Increases 
(Doc. T77-085) 



-7- 



»3« 



B&F Comm. 
4/20/77 



UM/Wo re ester — 
Fee Increases 
(Doc. T77-087) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Compulsory Health Insurance Fee for 
Foreign Students. 

and it was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that all part-time graduate and under- 
graduate students at the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston be required to 
pay a health service fee in the amount 
of 50 percent of the health service fee 
required of full-time students; further, 
that full-time graduate students be re- 
quired to pay the same health service 
fee required of full-time undergraduate 
students. The Chancellor of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Boston shall 
be and is hereby authorized in extraordinary 
cases to waive the fee to be paid by part- 
time graduate and undergraduate students 
at his discretion. 

Chairman Carlson turned next to the matter of Fee In- 
creases — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-087), asking Chancellor Bulger to 
comment. Chancellor Bulger said that currently there were only 
three fee-based Trust Funds on the campus — the Housing Trust Fund, 
the Student Health Fund and the Student Equipment and Maintenance 
Fund. He said the campus had spent considerable time and effort 
under the leadership of Mr. Feinblatt, the Director of Student Af- 
fairs, to develop a program which could serve as a model as the 
student body increases in size. He said that although the physi- 
cian services could be provided under the Family Practice program 
at no cost to the students, the Hospital services, they felt, 
could not be free. Therefore, there had been much discussion 
with the student body as to what services they required or desirec 
which resulted in the request for an increase in fee to cover the 
type of health service that has been selected. 

Chancellor Bulger asked Mr. Cathey, Controller, to com- 
ment on the increase in the Housing fees. Mr. Cathey said that 
the increases were proposed in order to ensure that the Housing 
Trust Fund would be entirely self-supporting and to make the rent 
schedule more equitable. 

Secretary Hardy noted that the proposed change in the 
uses of the Equipment Fee had been postponed for further study. 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve a Student Health Service Fee of 
$100 per student, with an additional fee 



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and further 



VOTED 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of $75 to cover all dependents of a student, 

at the University of Massachusetts at Worcester, 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the increased schedules of rental fees for the 
housing program provided through the Housing 
Trust Fund at the University of Massachusetts 
at Worcester; provided , that rents for unfurnished, 
single rooms shall range from $70 to $90, for 
furnished, single rooms from $80 to $100, and 
for one bedroom apartments from $163 to $173, 
in accordance with the value-point system in 
effect in the housing program. 



Chairman Carlson introduced next the Need-based Tuition 
Waiver Policy item, asking Ms. Hanson to summarize the Student 
Affairs discussion on this subject. She said this policy had been 
initiated late in the last academic year and therefore not all of 
the $225,000 amount available for waivers was used, but the evi- 
dence indicated that it was a good policy and it will have far 
greater use this next year. She said it had been fully discussed 
by the Committee on Student Affairs and that Committee had recom- 
mended its continuance for two more years. On motion made and 
seconded, it was then 



"5309 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 

extend for the academic years 1977-78 and 1978- 
79, the need-based tuition waiver policy as 
approved by the Board on May 5, 1976, and con- 
tained in Trustee Document T76-071; further, to 
recommend that the Board direct the Financial Aid 
Offices to include amounts of tuition waived and 
profiles of waiver recipients in their semi- 
annual reports to the Committee on Student Af- 
fairs on Admissions and Financial Aid; and further, 
to recommend that the Board direct the Financial 
Aid Offices to report to the Board immediately 
in the event that drastic changes in federal or 
state financial aid funding warrant reconsidera- 
tion of the policy. 

Chairman Carlson introduced the next item, a report on 
the Fee-assisted Summer Session — UM/Boston, and asked Chancellor 
Golino to comment on the report. Chancellor Golino said he would 
only add to the report that had been distributed that the campus 
was happy with the results of its first summer program and that 
the enrollment for the upcoming summer session is double that of 
last year. 

The next item of agenda was the Establishment of the 
Howard A. Turner Endowment Fund. At the request of the Chairman, 



-9- 



B&F Comm. 
4/20/77 



Need-based 
Tuition Waiver 
Policy 



UM/Boston — 
Fee-assisted 
Summer Session 



Establishment 
of Howard A. 
Turner Endow- 
ment Fund 
(Doc. T77-088) 



V.5 



B&F Comm. 
4/20/77 



UM/Wo re ester — 

Fringe 

Benefits 

Report 

(Doc. T77-090) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson explained that under the terms of the will of 
Mr. Turner, an alumnus of the Amherst campus, the University had 
been given $31,056.36 as an unrestricted endowment. There was no 
discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees accept 
the bequest of $31,056.36 under the will of 
Howard A. Turner, Class 1912, and establish a 
memorial Endowment Fund with the income earned 
during the previous fiscal year to be trans- 
ferred to the Chancellor's Special Trust Fund, 
where the unrestricted income may be used for 
high priority activities as the Chancellor may 
deem to be in the best interest of the Amherst 
campus. 

The next item of agenda, said Chairman Carlson, was the 
Fringe Benefits Package for the Group Practice — UM/Worcester . He 



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called attention to the University of Massachusetts Medical School 



Group Practice Fringe Benefit Report (Doc. T77-090) which had been 



circulated. He then introduced Mr. Miller of Wyatt Company and 
Mr. Flynn of Arthur Young and Company, who were consultants work- 
ing with UM/Worcester personnel on Group Practice fringe benefits. 
He then asked Chancellor Bulger to comment . Chancellor Bulger 
said he was looking forward to the day when he could bring to the 
Committee matters of a purely substantive and educational nature, 
but, first, the campus financial situation had to be put in order. 
He likened the situation at the Medical School to a carbuncle, 
which, he said, was a localized infection that gets worse and wore 
until it finally bursts and the evil humors come out, after which 
over a period of some days, things get better. 

Chancellor Bulger said that UM/Worcester administration 
was proposing that the fringe benefits package for the Group Prac- 
tice be implemented at such time as it was economically feasible. 
Chairman Carlson noted the completeness of the report and asked if 
Mr. Miller or Mr. Flynn wished to comment on it. Mr. Miller said 
that he understood that the part of the report under immediate 
consideration was that dealing with the compulsory portion of the 
benefits package — dental coverage, $48,000 of group term life 
insurance, and a long-term disability income policy. He said 
these were basic benefits, designed to supplement benefits already 
available through the University. In reply to a query from Trus- 
tee Troy, Ms. Hanson explained that the source of funds to support 
this benefits package would come from the Group Practice Trust 
Fund. The benefits program would grow, she said, as the Trust 
Fund income increased. On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the Chancellor/Dean of the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Worcester to implement the components 
of the fringe benefit program as outlined in 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Section 2 "compulsory benefits" and Section 3 
"cafeteria benefits" as set forth in Doc. T77- 
090, pursuant to the requirements of Section 
11F of the Rules and Regulations of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Medical School Group Prac- 
tice (Doc. T77-144A). 

The second item related to Group Practice, said Chairman 
Carlson, was for information only, and asked Chancellor Bulger to 
speak to the AHMAC Contrast. 

Chancellor Bulger said the ability of the campus to col- 
lect revenues had been questioned, as it should have been, but he 
said he felt the campus had demonstrated over the last few months 
that it could collect the money on the Hospital side. Now, he 
said, the Group Practice Administrator, Dan Ference, was demon- 
strating that the campus could also collect money on the Group 
Practice side. Chancellor Bulger said that Hospital Management 
Associates had been selected to provide the personnel and assume 
all costs for machine processing of receivables. In the two 
months that they had been working, he said, several months of 
backlog at Worcester and Pondville had been processed and reliable 
projections were now possible. As the success of the billing sys- 
tem is ascertained, he said, more departments of the Medical Center 
would be handled in this manner. Chairman Carlson said he hoped 
the campus would be keeping records of the cost effectiveness of 
this system vis a. vis attempting to do the billing internally. 
Mr. Ference indicated that he would be keeping such records. 



Chairman Carlson turned next to the matter of Hospital 
Rate Increases — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-089), asking Chancellor 
Bulger to speak. The Chancellor deferred to Mr. Campbell, Vice 
Chancellor for Administration and Finance, who commented that in 
the FY 1978 Revised Budget, the revenue estimates included an 
assumption for a 20 percent rate increase effective January 1, 
1978. He said it now appeared that it would be prudent to ask 
for a lesser increase at an earlier date. Therefore, the campus 
was proposing that it be authorized to request the Rate Setting 
Commission for a 10 percent increase effective June 1, 1977. This 
would enable the campus to predict more reliably at the beginning 
of the fiscal year the approximate income for the year, rather 
than after six months had elapsed. It would also be helpful 
should a federal restriction on rate increases be forthcoming in 
the next year and it would improve the cash flow situation. He 
said that the firm of Ernst & Ernst had been engaged to study the 
impact of various rate increases on the various purchasers of 
health care services. Their report, he said, was on hand, and he 
had brought copies for distribution to the Committee. Various 
aspects of the report were then discussed. In reply to an inquiry 
Mr. Campbell said that the assumptions in the study were based on 
the information contained in the budget request approved by the 
Board of Trustees in March, which included an assumption of expan 



-11- 



B&F Comm. 
4/20/77 



UM/Worcester — 
AHMAC Contract 



UM/Worcester — 
Hospital Rate 
Increases 
(Doc. T77-089) 



-5312 



Authorization 
to use Blue 
Cross Current 
Financing 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

sion in the number of beds from 85 to 175. 

President Wood asked what kinds of discussions the cam- 
pus had had with the Rate Setting Commission, to which Mr. Camp- 
bell replied that the Commission encouraged the rate increase, 
especially since the actual costs are considerably higher than 
the income. 

Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for University 
Policy, said that at a meeting of the Hospital Management Board, 
Ms. Bluestone had expressed concern that rate increases would 
drive up the total cost of health care, no matter how justified 
they might be in relation to costs. Mr. Campbell clarified 
several other points and then on motion made and seconded, it 
was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize the Chancellor of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Worcester to 
seek an increase of hospital rates for 
the University Hospital effective June 1, 
1977. The weighted average of the rate 
increases shall not exceed 10 percent. 
Such rate increases to be as generally 
outlined in Trustee Document T77-089; 
further , to recommend that the Board 
request the Rate Setting Commission to 
approve said increase. 

The last item of agenda was the matter of Authorization 
to use Blue Cross Current Financing. Mr. Campbell explained that 
under the terms of the University's contract with Blue Cross, it 
was possible with the consent of the Board of Trustees to request 
an advance of funds to finance pending claims. The Hospital 
Management Board, he said, recommended that the University take 
advantage of this provision, thus enabling more timely return of 
funds to the State's general fund. A motion was made and seconded, 
and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

authorize the Chancellor of the Worcester 
campus under the provisions of the current 
Blue Cross contract to take the necessary 
procedural remedies in order to assure 
current financing of patient service claims 
incurred on the account of Massachusetts 
Blue Cross Incorporated. 

President Wood said that the Committee on Budget and 
Finance would be asked to consider before the May Board meeting 
the matter of some fund transfers. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood also called attention to a statement 
which had appeared in the Boston Herald recently, in which it 
appeared that the Counsel for the Secretary of Educational Affair^ 
was announcing tuition increases. President Wood said he had dis- 
cussed this statement with the Secretary and it seemed the in- 
creases to which he referred were those voted by the Board of 
Trustees last May, covering a three-year period. Commitments had 
been made at that time, he said, that the increases would cover a 
three-year cycle. He said there had been no change in the dele- 
gation of authority to set tuition, which rests with the Trustees, 
Trustee Spiller said he felt the statements by the Secretary were 
very inflammatory. The Secretary's remarks, he said, indicated 
that there would be a tuition increase, which is untrue; and that 
the Executive Office of Educational Affairs had the power to raise 
tuition, which is also false. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 12:15 p.m. 



5313 



B&F Comm. 
4/20/77 



ySladysljKeith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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ATTENDANCE: 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON LONG-RANGE PLANNING 

April 20, 1977; 1:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Rowland; President Wood; 



Trustees Baker, Breyer, Carlson and Clark; Secretary Hardy; Mr. 
Miller, recorder 

Committee Members Absent : Trustees Anrig and Marks 



Other Trustees: Trustee Batiste 



Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cooley, 
Associate Vice President for Analytical Studies; Ms. Weiner, 
Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor and 



Provost; Mr. Beatty, Director of Budgeting and Institutional 
Studies; Mr. Tillis, Special Advisor to the Provost on Arts 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 



Adademic Affairs; Professor Schwartz, Faculty Representative 
UM/Worcester : Mr. Smith, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and 



Provost; Professor Smith, Faculty Representative 

Guests: Ms. Shukri, Executive Office of Educational Affairs; Mr. 






o31 



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Martus, Student, UM/Amherst 

Chairman Rowland called the meeting to order at 1:10 Master Planning 
p.m. She asked President Wood to speak to the first item on the Assumptions and 
agenda, Master Planning: Assumptions and Scenarios . President Scenarios 
Wood said that it would become clear in the course of his remarks | (Doc. T77-094) 
that at this meeting the Committee was being asked to address it- 
self to the second stage of the master planning process. He then 
noted that this was the first time the Committee had formally ad- 
dressed Master Planning on a University-wide basis; heretofore 
the issue had been dealt with campus by campus. This being the 
case, he said, it was appropriate to restate the Committee's 
responsibilities as laid down in the By-laws: 

To oversee the development and continuing review 
of a master plan for the University; 

— To ensure the coordination of policies related to 
physical and educational planning; 

— To review and make recommendations on proposals 






L-RP Comm. 
4/20/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for major new programs and program changes affecting 
space planning; and 

— To consider recommendations from the President related 
to planning activities within the University, and to 
make recommendations to the Board of Trustees with 
respect thereto. 

The Committee on Long-Range Planning, he continued, 
was established after the seminal Board vote of November, 1972, 
specifying institutional need as one of the criteria for tenure 
and placing decisions of academic appointments within the con- 
text of long-range plans. In 1973 and 1974, he met twice with the 
deans and department heads of all campuses, once in Northfield 
and once at Worcester. These meetings were held in order to 
identify the criticality of the planning process, to emphasize 
the needs for departments and schools to take the plans serious- 
ly and to stress the concern which stemmed from the steady state 
University and the growing problem of maintaining flexibility 
among academic fields and ranks. 

In January, 1975, the Board held an informal meeting 
at the Parkman House to review campus plans. The Trustees came 
to two conclusions — the budget crunch was coming and setting 
priorities was critical. In February and March of 1975, the 
administration and the campuses, at the bidding of the Trustees, 
undertook the so-called "February exercise" of contingency 
planning. Shortly after this, the budget crunch began and as 
a result, the exercise was, in effect, aborted. 

In March, 1976, President Wood continued, it was clear 
that the immediate crisis had abated. Short run deprivations 
occurred but there were no layoffs. Planning instructions 
for the campuses were established by the President's Office 
emphasizing programmatic details and the development of priorities 
In November, 1976, the Long-Range Planning Committee then re- 
viewed the mandate to the administration to resume the planning 
process in conjunction with the campuses and authorized the 
President's Office to devise scenarios of possible future direc- 
tions. These were transmitted to the campuses and several 
Provosts responded with initial academic plans by the deadline 
of February, 1977. 

In the responses, he said, it was apparent that the 
Provosts took the academic side of planning very seriously. 
Provost Puryear, the President said, deserved particular commen- 
dation. He had arrived in mid-process, had "hit the deck running 
and had produced an excellent first stage document. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The second stage of the campus planning had begun with 
a process which will include, in accordance with the Governance 
document, the privilege of faculty to participate in the effort. 
The President said he felt he had to say that during the long 
three years the privilege had been open and had been extended, 
but that the plans which had reached his office were either based 
on coping with reduced resources through attrition, or hopes that 
somehow things would get better. 

Basically, President Wood continued, the process, man- 
dated by the Long-Range Planning Committee last year, still stand 
as far as his office is concerned. Consistent with the Committee 
statement adopted for Boston, priorities would be given first to 
the College of Professional Studies and to the College of Public 
and Community Services. The College of Liberal Arts would have 
a steady state enrollment and all existing programs will be sub- 
ject to resource analysis and program review. The mandate to 
Amherst was a steady state enrollment, continuing excellence and 
development in graduate programs and a close and clear scrutiny 
of existing departments. 

At this meeting, the President continued, the Committee 
would address the second part of the process — consideration of 
the planning assumptions and scenarios contained in Doc. T77-094. 
These in effect laid down guidelines for the further planning at 
each of the campuses and he asked the Committee to consider them, 
and where necessary question them. He expressed his hope that 
the Committee would recommend endorsement of the guidelines to 
the full Board, thus enabling him to transmit them to the Chancel 
lors as a context for further refinement of their campus plans. 
This would allow the FY79 Budget request to be based on coherent 
plans which spoke to the need to maintain a university of integ- 
rity, rather than the past practice of free floating estimates 
and "finger in the wind" analyses. As Secretary Hardy had once 
observed, he concluded, long-range plans are developed for the 
purpose of achieving the goals and missions of the institution; 
and then the institution must seek the resources to implement the 
plans from a variety of sources. 



Trustee Carlson said he wanted to comment on the Presi- 
dent's remarks about the budgetary stringencies. Such stringencies 
had been with the University for some time and would continue to 
be so for the foreseeable future. In his opinion, the question 
of the absolute level of resources was separate from the allocation 
of those resources. Also, even with severe budget restraints it 
was the Trustees' responsibility to look at the optimum allocation 
of those resources. He said the option of maintaining the status 
quo in allocation and hoping for an increase in resources was not 
open. The Trustees had to address the question of relative priori- 
ties and relative allocation of resources. He stressed his long 
held belief that Trustee input to this process was vital. It was 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

not a process wherein priorities and plans were developed on cam- 
pus and then presented to the Committee. He said Committee input 
could include concurrence and approval or modification of proposejl 
assumptions. These would then be transmitted to the several cam' 
puses, with the understanding that they were not to be reviewed 
and second guessed. They were to be the basis for campus plannin 
efforts. 

Trustee Breyer said that the first Board meeting he had 
attended as a Trustee was the meeting at the Parkman House. He 
said the discussion had centered on "real" planning, necessitated 
by the possibility, seemingly remote at that time, that budgets 
would remain fixed. The Trustees agreed that if this unlikely 
situation were to develop there would be two possible results — 
either there would be no further growth or cuts would have to be 
made. The latter possibility raised the question of where cuts 
were to be made. He said this question carried with it a problem 
one that he as a faculty member could fully understand. If the 
matter was left entirely to the faculty to decide, the decision, 
because it would be politically expedient to do so, would be that 
everyone would be treated alike. All would grow or shrink an 
equal amount. The beauty of such an approach, he continued, is 
that there is no political controversy on campus. The harm of 
such an approach is that it destroys the university. Level fund 
ing, over an extended period, entails either mediocrity or making 
difficult decisions, such as, for example, eliminating certain 
departments or favoring some departments over others. 

From the students' point of view, Trustee Breyer con- 
tinued, it was a question of their being offered a broad range 
of mediocrity or a narrower range of quality. He said his readin 
of the discussion at the Parkman House was that hard choices woulp 
have to be made and the quality of the University maintained. Hijs 
conversations with new Trustees led him to believe that they 
agreed with this stance. This meant that the Trustees and the 
administration would have to set assumptions or guidelines which 
would enable the campuses to determine where cuts were to be made 
and where quality was to be fostered. Also, the administration 
would have to force the faculties to make these extremely hard 
decisions . 

He said he had read in the Collegian that Provost 
Puryear was under fire at Amherst because of a planning document 
which had been sent to the faculty. Without going into the meritjs 
of the case, the heartening thing to him was that this was an 
indication that the process was beginning to happen. 

Chancellor Bromery said a meeting had been held with 
the faculty governance unit over a year ago. At that meeting, 
they were told that planning was in the offing. The faculty mem- 
bers recognized this but did not want to accept responsibility 
for making the hard decisions. They wanted the administration tc 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

do this and to be the target of faculty ire. This was the reason: 
for the current uproar — somebody had to pick up the smoking gun 
and, for so doing, get stomped. Faculty would never pick up the 
gun. 



Chairman Rowland then asked Ms. Robinson to discuss the 
document at hand. Ms. Robinson said she would discuss the Plan- 
ning Assumptions in the document and then ask Mr. Cooley to dis- 
cuss the Scenarios for Campus Planning. The assumptions, she 
said, were a series of judgments, policy commitments and statements 
of faith as to the settings in which the University would operate 
in the coming years. They stemmed from existing policies of the 
Board and past operating assumptions of the University. 

The assumptions, she continued, were intended to address 
at an appropriate level, those areas which were clearly the re- 
sponsibility of the Board and which were of strong interest to 
the Trustees. These included the particular missions of the cam- 
puses and the overall mission of the University; enrollment plan- 
ning; resources; general program development; and University-wide 
organization. 

With regard to Trustee Breyer's comments on reallocations, 
Ms. Robinson said, the assumptions and scenarios with regard to 
resource projections were not intended to suggest that any segmenjt 
of the University could continue doing what it had been doing and 
that necessary funds would be forthcoming. Reallocations will be 
necessary. The assumptions could be construed as minimal or 
survival: Boston and Worcester cannot stay viable at their presept 
size. Given the modest fund increases expected, which are inade- 
quate even for the projected growth, some cuts will have to be 
made to achieve stated goals. For example, the assumptions that 
there would be increased off-campus programs and student support 
services at all three campuses and limited graduate programs at 
Boston and Worcester will require resource reallocation. She 
noted that by contrast the state's present interpretation of levejl 
funding — which ignored inflation — would result in a situation 
where consideration would have to be given to closing whole schoojls, 
not departments. 

Mr. Cooley said the section on the mission of the Uni- 
versity in the document restated the traditional mission, with 
an increased role in the field of continuing and extended educa- 
tion. The first two assumptions on enrollment reflected two 
national trends — a shift of students to professional and career 
oriented programs and an increasing demand for adult and continu- 
ing education. The third enrollment assumption was based on the 
projected increase of high school graduates within the Common- 
wealth, and a slight shift in enrollment from private to public 
institutions . 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

For each campus, Mr. Cooley continued, differential year 
ly increases in resources had been projected — 2 percent at Amherst 
6 percent at Boston and 6 percent at Worcester. 

As for resources, Mr. Cooley said, the assumptions were 
at once optimistic and conservative. He noted that while the Uni- 
versity budget was projected to grow from $99.2 million in 1977 
to $159.9 in 1983, only $14.5 million of the increase was new 
money, the remainder would be caused by inflation. The inflation 
index used was that for higher education, which was slightly great 
er than that for the economy as a whole. 

One major factor in determining the program assumptions, 
Mr. Cooley said, was the supposition that the character of the 
student body would continue to change and at some point non-tradi- 
tional students would become the majority. This new majority would 
require support services which would entail additional expenditures 

With regard to the scenarios for the three campuses, he 
continued, Amherst was, in effect, a mature campus and the scenario 
designed for it mainly dealt with internal adjustments and reallo- 
cations due to changing interests and attitudes. The scenario for 
Boston spoke to further implementation of Trustee policies. At 
Worcester the scenario calls for program growth and program diver- 
sity, particularly in allied health areas and continuing education 
for practicing physicians; and increased interagency agreements. 

Trustee Breyer said he had recently been in contact with 
a number of people both in Massachusetts and Washington and had 
found a widespread and apparently deep anti-intellectual, anti- 
university, anti-professor attitude in unexpected places. Given 
this mood, he asked if projecting increases in federal and state 
funding to cover inflation and growth was being overly optimistic. 
Trustee Carlson said that responsible planning could not take plade 
in such an environment even if it existed. The Trustees had to 
assume that at the very least the University could accommodate the* 
projected increase in enrollment from the Commonwealth. He noted 
that the scenarios were based on this assumption. 



Mr. Lynton said it was implicit in the scenarios and 
assumptions that in order to maintain the requisite internal 
priorities the planning process must include fallback positions. 
President Wood said the final determination of what would occur 
was a function of the budget and that the planning process should 
not include self-fulfilling prophecies. Ms. Robinson pointed out 
that the one campus which took the planning process seriously 
when the budget crisis first became apparent, in its plan during 
the February exercise, started by considering the elimination of 
a major professional school. In such an instance, it is not pos- 
sible to say that a given school will be closed in, for example, 
three years' time and this will be announced at that time. The 
closure has to be announced immediately and beginning enrollments 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

have to cease. The development of plans have to be based on re- 
source assumptions, then additional resources would have to be 
sought if not realized from the anticipated sources. 

Trustee Breyer said he understood the need to make pro- 
jections which did not assume the worst. He asked what would 
happen if the worst did in fact come about. If only a lesser 
number of dollars than projected were available, was there a 
mechanism which would allow the University some flexibility in 
determining how to cope with this situation? He noted that the 
budget of San Francisco State had been cut. The administration 
didn't want to fire people. Instead they developed a number of 
alternatives to firing — early retirement, team teaching, etc. He 
said this required intellectual and administrative effort and 
asked if this was included in the planning process. 

Mr. Puryear said he wished to answer Trustee Breyer 's 
first question, that of meeting fairly ambitious projections. His 
method of dealing with this was to be somewhat on the conservative 
side in making projections and to assume that over the next five 
years Amherst would at least have the same dollars as in FY77, 
without any adjustments for inflation. The next step was to intro 
duce into the plans some priorities which provide guidance for 
allocating resources. If the projections provided by the Planning 
Office proved true, his plans allowed for upward adjustments in 
accordance with the established priorities. Mr. Puryear said it 
had been his experience that it was easier to make upward adjust- 
ments than to have to deal with a budget that was smaller than 
projected. He said he agreed with the statements which had been 
made concerning the necessity to make projections about reasonably 
needs. 

On the question of reallocations and their impact on 
staff, Mr. Puryear continued, he was always aware of the humane 
considerations. At Amherst there had been discussion of, and 
work towards, early retirement plans. While it was too early to 
go into detail, he said, the master plan might allow faculty to 
move from one campus to another. Also, in the near future, he 
planned to seek monies from a foundation in order to develop pro- 
grams that will help faculty to adjust. 

President Wood said that the resource and enrollment 
assumptions, to aid the campuses in their efforts to sort out 
relative roles and responsibilities, had been expressed on a Uni- 
versity-wide basis and came from the Trustees. If the parameters 
proved unrealistic, this could not be laid at the door of either 
Provost. 

In response to Trustee Breyer' s concern about humane 
considerations, the President continued, his approach was an on- 
going process — a series of successive "if thens , what will happen 
and how priorities are then reordered. He said he still felt the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University was a viable instrument and intended to ask legislators 
and others if that was what they wanted, or did they want mediocrity 
across the Board. He stressed that if the necessary resources 
weren't forthcoming, it was important that the University not come 
up with its own version of level funding. 

Chancellor Bromery said that administrators on campus 
had to be aware of faculty volatility when planning matters were 
being discussed. Given this volatility, he said, the Provost's 
conservative approach was a correct one. This approach provided 
la fall-forward position rather than a fall-back one. If faculty 
knew there were fall-back positions available, they would not 
make the necessary judgments. 



Mr. Steamer said that Boston, without consulting Mr. 
Puryear, had reached the same conclusion — that is, to expect the 
worst possible. In trying to enlarge two colleges without any 
increase in funds, he too was running into a hornet's nest. Fac- 
ulty would give some help in making hard decisions but they would 
not provide initiative. 

Chancellor Golino said the Trustees had set very clear 
priorities for the Boston campus. However, there was the pos- 
sibility that at some point in the future Boston would have no 
growth and no additional money and would still have to meet the 
mandated priorities. In this event, in order to meet the mandate 
for growth in the College of Professional Studies and the College 
of Public and Community Services, resources would have to be shift 
ed from the College of Liberal Arts. This possibility has under- 
standably upset the College of Liberal Arts faculty and they claim 
the integrity of the College should be protected. In response to 
this, the College has been told that it should conduct a set of 
program reviews. Hopefully, this will indicate resources which 
can be shifted and can be redistributed by the Vice Chancellor. 

Professor Smith said that as a faculty representative, 
she agreed that the faculty could not effectively cut itself back. 
Faculty was not alone in this inability; no group could adequately 
police itself. However, she urged that faculty and students be 
aware of what was going on. She agreed that it was necessary to 
choose excellence over mediocrity, but the University should not 
proceed in the way other institutions had, where necessary actions; 
had been done in a way that alienated everyone. Faculty and stu- 
dents have to be in the discussions, but she agreed that guide- 
lines from the Trustees are necessary. 

President Wood said the basic point of the meeting was 
to disentangle the enrollment and resource assumptions of the 
Trustees and the campuses' responses to them. If this were ac- 
complished, the University would be out of the guessing game of 
what resources were to be provided. He said that while at times 
it might appear necessary to adopt positions which assuaged 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

anxieties, the Trustees at all times had the right to say what 
they were Trustees of and what they intend to do to discharge 
their responsibility of preservation. This, he concluded, was 
the starting point. 

Chairman Rowland asked Mr. Smith to speak to the situa- 
tion at the Medical Center. Mr. Smith said that at this time the | 
Medical Center in planning could think only in terms of one 
direction — growth. The goal was to reach a plateau but this was 
still in the future. The Medical School also had to consider 
accreditation. A document had been prepared dealing with this 
matter. Copies would be given to the Trustees enabling them to 
see where the School had to go in order to have the present 
temporary accreditation changed to a long-term one. 



Professor Schwartz said he was fully in agreement with 
the comments that had been made about academic excellence and the 
need to cut programs; however, he was concerned about implementa- 
tion of plans. For example, one consideration which had not been 
fully elaborated was the matter of current constraints — the 
number of tenured faculty in certain departments which had legal 
obligation for the next year or two, even though the departments 
were not excellent or in great demand or in line with plans that 
were welcome and needed. He said he had other concerns which 
could best be expressed in two possible scenarios for the Boston 
Campus. In one scenario, funds from the College of Liberal Arts 
would be shifted immediately to the College of Professional 
Studies and the College of Public and Community Services. This 
would be a humane and legally possible decision. That is, cuts 
would be made in those departments and programs that have vacancies 
coming about, and that have fewer tenured people. It would not 
be possible to shift major resources from the College of Liberal 
Arts to the other two Colleges in this year or the next in a 
rational way; e.g., strengthening programs needing strengthening 
and weakening others, because the administration's hands are 
tied. 



L-RP Comm. 
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I 



Another kind of scenario, Professor Schwartz continued, 
under the same guidelines where planning does take place, and 
some of the other kinds of evaluations also take place, would be 
an evaluation of non-direct delivery faculty resources — the 
effectiveness of administration and the effectiveness of auxiliary 
services. In other words, the evaluation of goals and effective- 
ness should not be restricted solely to academic programs. Also, 
given a year or two, options which had been mentioned, such as 
early retirement, and additional flexibility could be considered. 
An example of flexibility would be a person in the English Depart- 
ment who, because of the ability to teach writing, could be shift-' 
ed to support services. Such a faculty member, if tenured, could 
be offered a three-year contract. Another example would be a 
person in a low demand department such as physics being "reallo- 
cated" to an allied field of higher demand, such as mathematics. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

These were not things that could be done next year or overnight, 
Professor Schwartz said. Even if there was little demand for the 
Physics Department at its present level, the department would 
have to be kept because of lack of freedom of administrative ac- 
tion — the Department is 95 percent tenured, he added. 

Professor Schwartz said that he fully agreed it would 
be awful to wind up with from 23 to 25 mediocre departments in the 
College of Liberal Arts, but that is exactly what is going to be 
fostered if the Trustees insist on implementing and shifting re- 
sources at a time when there hadn't been time to do evaluations 
in academic and non-academic areas. Shifting resources to the 
College of Professional Studies and the College of Public and Com- 
munity Services would result in the very thing the Trustees wish 
to avoid. As the Chancellor and Vice Chancellor would say, he con 
tinued, there is not the freedom to the extent necessary for such 
a shift of resources. 

Mr. Steamer said he disagreed in part. A start had to 
be made, to keep putting implementation off would mean the loss 
of another year. There was enough flexibility in the College of 
Liberal Arts to pull back at this time and then lend some of the 
positions back to the College. This had been the intention for 
some time, while the in-depth evaluation to determine the final 
form the College would take was ongoing. Both needed to occur at 
the same time. It was not true, Mr. Steamer said, that the Col- 
lege would be ruined by drawing back fairly heavily in one year. 
It would be painful but it could be done. 

President Wood said that support services and administra- 
tion were subject to shifts of resources and the next charge to 
the Planning Office would be to examine this matter. As regards 
campus growth and development: the lead times for re-tooling wer| 
a question of fact in terms of campus activities, as were the per- 
centages of tenure within individual departments. 

Another point, President Wood continued, was that the 
administration and the Trustees over the years, in the form of 
statements, documents, minutes and discussions, had tried to tell 
faculty that the planning process was going to happen. For what- 
ever reason, this effort had not succeeded. At this time, the 
President stressed, it was very important that the faculty repre- 
sentatives' communications to faculty be clear, comprehensive and 
continuing. Such reports, he concluded, could have great impact. 

Mr. Lynton said that in discussing the time table during 
which planning takes place, a distinction should be made between 
program evaluation and the analysis of basic resource use. The 
best planning assumed every program was very good. This assumptxon 
ensured that none of the hard questions would be ignored and would 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

enable the planners to determine where resources were being used 
wisely and where they were not. Also, in the subject of wide dis- 
semination of discussions and proposals, perhaps there was really 
not too great a distinction between the worst case contingency 
planning, which the campuses see as necessary, and the long-range 
planning parameters proposed by the President's Office. The reasojn 
for this, he said, is that planning at the campus level should lead 
to a kind of modified program budgeting, whereby a discretionary 
allocable pool of resources was created which was of a size some- 
where between the worst possible case and the more optimistic pro- 
jection. In the planning process, priorities are set for the 
margin between worst and best. 

Mr. Beatty, referring to Professor Schwartz' point about 
evaluating the administration, said he and Mr. Puryear had dis- 
cussed the matter of the relative priorities of the planning proc- 
ess. They had concluded that evaluating administrative and suppoi t 
services at the same time as the faculty would result in the budgqt 
driving the program. In a university, the top priority was the 
academic enterprise. Therefore, it was decided to set academic 
priorities first and then do the administrative and support serv 
ices. Trustee Carlson said this was the correct procedure. Also, 
he said, to put Mr. Lynton's point another way, the review of 
present programs should follow the planning assumptions, rather 
than drive the assumptions. Program review tended to be an 
immediate and short-range kind of activity and should not "get in 
the way" of basic planning involved. President Wood said he 
agreed that the sequence described by Mr. Beatty was the correct 
one. However, it was important that all planning came together 
prior to the beginning of the budget process. This should happen 
at the Chancellor's level. 

There was no further discussion and Chairman Rowland 
suggested that the Committee act on a vote she had drafted. She 
read the vote and it was moved, seconded and unanimously 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board that the President 
be directed to transmit to the Chancellors 
the planning assumptions and scenarios for 
the University that are contained in Doc. 
T77-094 to serve as guidelines in the further 
development of campus plans and in the con- 
tinued development of the master plan for the 
University. 

Professor Schwartz asked leave to ask two specific ques 
tions and to state one general concern. On page two of the 
Scenarios for Campus Planning, it was stated that the College of 
Liberal Arts would be responsible for providing the liberal arts 
core for the College of Professional Studies. He found this a 
very clear and helpful statement; however, he was puzzled because 
it was limited to the College of Professional Studies. He asked 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

why the College of Public and Community Services was not included 
Mr. Lynton said this was because of the similarity of the educa- 
tional methods of the College of Liberal Arts and the College of 
Professional Studies. Also, while a similar arrangement between 
the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Public and Communi 
ty Services was an allowable and probably desirable proposal, the 
matter had not been fully enough discussed to be mandated as a 
planning assumption. The possibility was not foreclosed. 

Professor Schwartz asked if there was a mechanism estab 
lished to evaluate this possibility. Mr. Lynton said this was up 
to the campus. Mr. Steamer said the methodology of the College o 
Public and Community Services was difficult to mesh with that of 
the College of Liberal Arts, but it was being discussed, with a 
view to having a similar mandate involving the College of Public 
and Community Services. 



Professor Schwartz said his second question was about 
the statement about the extended day program. He asked if this 
statement meant that the Board was telling the Boston campus to 
encourage continuing education and non-degree programs, or if the 
campus should continue with the present extended day program which 
was limited to matriculated students. He wondered if the state- 
ment was purposely vague and a matter for further discussion. Mr 
Lynton said two different planning assumptions were involved. The 
statement in the section on the mission of the University, that 
the University would assume a special role in continuing education 
whether directed to matriculated or non-matriculated students, was 
directed to all campuses. The assumption for the Boston campus 
was directed to the issue of physical facilities and the more 
effective use thereof. In response to Professor Schwartz' question, 
Mr. Lynton said that the Boston campus should encourage continuing 
education programs directed at both matriculants and non-matricu- 
lants . 

Professor Schwartz said his general concern had to do 
with the assumptions on missions and enrollment. Many of these 
were based on demand and population projections and, to his mind, 
over-emphasized professional education. While this overemphasis 
was probably unintended, it could create an unfortunate situation 
for UM/Boston. Traditionally, a liberal arts education had been 
the most common road to leadership in society. If UM/Boston were 
seen as a school for professionals, potential leaders, particular- 
ly those who could afford it, would opt for private schools and 
the University would be the poorer for this. He said that some- 
where in the assumptions on the mission of the University a balance 
between professional and liberal arts education should have been 
reached. There should be a statement of continuing commitment toi 
an undergraduate liberal arts education, for the poor and the les$ 
advantaged, as crucial to developing leaders and to create a more 
diverse society. Chairman Rowland asked if the first paragraph 
of the statement on mission answered his concern. Professor 



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Schwartz said the words "liberal arts" appeared only in the sectior 
on graduate education. 

Trustee Carlson suggested that the phrase, "including 
an appropriate long term balance between liberal arts and profes- 
sional education," be added to paragraph 3 of the mission state- 
ment. Such a phrase, he said, would not mandate precise ratios 
but would recognize the need for balance. 



Chancellor Bromery asked if the vote just taken was to 
adopt the guidelines. He said his office had received a draft of 
the guidelines and was still in the process of preparing a re- 
sponse. The response would include suggested changes. He asked 
if it was correct to assume that the assumptions and scenarios 
had been adopted in principle and were subject to changes. Pres- 
ident Wood said the vote was to recommend to the Board an endorse- 
ment of the assumptions. He said he hoped that stylistic and 
other amendments would come from the May meeting of the Board. 
The assumptions will act as the parameters within which the cam- 
puses will begin to fit academic, student and administrative 
services . 

Trustee Breyer asked if the assumptions were just that, 
and not meant to change previous Board votes. President Wood saic 
they were basically consistent with previous votes. Trustee 
Breyer said there was a risk that people might read into the as- 
sumptions tremendous implications for one department or another, 
and this could lead to endless debate. He said that the assump- 
tions were not meant to be seen as being "etched in stone," and 
therefore unchangeable. President Wood agreed but stressed that 
it was important to realize that neither were the assumptions 
wishy washy rhetoric which formed a tent capable of housing any 
camel. 

Mr. Lynton said that the Provosts and the Chancellors 
intended to circulate the assumptions and scenarios as a means of 
indicating that the planning process was a serious enterprise. 
He said the assumptions with regard to resources would be very 
carefully drawn. The danger, as seen by those on the campuses, 
was that at a time when pressure was being put on departments and 
colleges to seriously consider internal reallocations, they will 
see a figure indicating a net growth and will interpret this to 
mean that reallocations are not necessary. 

President Wood emphasized that the assumptions were the 
basis of the FY79 budget. He said if this was not clear in the 
qualitative language, it would become so after the campus financic 
officers had translated the language into numbers. He urged the 
faculty representatives and the Chancellors to convey this message 
to the campuses. 

Mr. Puryear asked leave to speak to the earlier discus- 



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Responses to 
Fine Arts 
Council 

Recommendations 
Phase II 



Statewide 
Planning: 
Issues and 
Options 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

sion on liberal arts and make a plea that nothing be put in writing 
which would continue the war between the liberal arts and the 
professional schools. He said that operationally there was a 
great deal of integration between the two and more integration 
should be fostered, and to separate them was to create a false 
distinction. At Amherst, efforts were under way to define liberal 
content in the professional curriculum to see how this interfaces 
with the interests of the students. He said the war was a false 
one and should not be continued. Chairman Rowland asked the Com- 
mittee if they wished to include the phrase suggested by Trustee 
Carlson in the mission section of the planning assumptions. Trus- 
tee Breyer said he would rather have the section remain as writter}. 
The whole document was meant to be neutral and its language shoulc 
not be changed. 

Chairman Rowland asked for a show of hands as to whether 
the Committee wanted to leave the document as received or to in- 
clude the suggested phrase. It was 

VOTED : To alter Doc. T77-094 by appending the 
phrase, "including an appropriate long 
term balance between liberal arts and 
professional education," to the third 
paragraph on page 1. 



Trustees Baker, Carlson and Clark voted "Yea." 
voted "Nay." 



Trustee Breyer 



Chairman Rowland then introduced the next item on the 
agenda, Responses to Fine Arts Council Recommendation: Phase II . 
Ms. Robinson said the material being distributed was the second 
round of responses to the recommendation of the Trustee Advisory 
Council on the Fine Arts. In view of the late arrival of the 
material, she suggested that the Academic Affairs and Planning 
Offices prepare comments on them for a future discussion by the 
Committee, or a possible meeting with the Fine Arts Council. 
Chairman Rowland suggested that the Committee do both. She said 
that it had been two and a half months since the last Committee 
meeting and she was forced to say that she was disappointed with 
the responses received then, and was again disappointed that the 
newly received reports had not been commented on by the President's 
Office. She asked Ms. Robinson when the comments would be avail- 
able and was told this would happen within a week or ten days. 
She then asked that the record show that the commentaries would 
be available by the end of the following week. 

The meeting then turned to the next item on the agenda, 
Statewide Planning: Issues and Options . Mr. Cooley said there 



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had been an informal meeting of the Chairmen of Long-Range Plan- 
ning Committees of three segments of higher education, the state 
and community colleges and the University of Massachusetts. The 
meeting focused on three areas — statewide planning, whereby the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

three segments are exchanging critical information pertaining to 
plans, planning policies and documents; possible program overlap, 
particularly with regard to allied health programs and the one 
real growth area, continuing education; and program articulation, 
articulating two and four year programs, articulating allied 
health programs on a more cooperative basis, and a four year 
graduate transition program. 

Most of the meeting, Mr. Cooley continued, dealt with 
the state of planning at each of the segments; that is, questions 
as to what planning had taken place and what successes had been 
achieved. The meeting concluded with the agreement that further 
such meetings should be held on an informal basis. 

Trustee Clark asked if the three segments were interest- 
ed in the common good or was each at the meeting because of self- 
interest. On the surface, she said, it appeared that the state 
and community colleges would benefit more than the University. M& 
Robinson said the community colleges presumably had a strong 
interest in finding places for their graduates. This could benefit 
both the state colleges and the University. Trustee Clark asked 
if the meeting had addressed the question of differentiation of 
missions among the segments. Mr. Cooley said this had happened, 
particularly with regard to continuing education. Chairman 
Rowland said she found the meeting to have been very interesting 
and thoughtful, attended by people of good will. 

Trustee Carlson said he had to get on his soapbox. One 
of the great issues facing the Commonwealth, one that was yet to 
be directly addressed in any proposed reorganization of higher 
education, is that at some point somebody has to decide what the 
missions of the community colleges, the state colleges and the 
University are. He said he had urged this on the immediate 
predecessor of the present Secretary of Educational Affairs and 
had yet to see that anything was being done. Trustee Clark said 
it was conceivable that the segments did not want their missions 
defined. Trustee Carlson said even if that were true, it did not 
relieve the Commonwealth of its responsibility to act. Mr. Lyntoiji 
pointed out that this was the continuing frustration of represent- 
ing the President on the Board of Higher Education. In principle 
it was the Board's mission to do so, but they concentrated on 
other areas. Chairman Rowland said if the non-professionals 
could get along, it might achieve something that the professionals 
couldn' t . 

The meeting then turned to the final item on the agenda] 
Continuing Education . President Wood said in terms of academic 
content, demography, budget and the appropriate strategy to pursu^, 
the document at hand, Extended and Continuing Education , the report 
of the Multicampus Subcommittee on Adult and Continuing Education! 
was an excellent guide. He referred the Trustees to the committed 
membership list at the end of the report, which showed an impres- 



5329 



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L-RP Comm. 
4/20/77 



Continuing 
Education 



«L."5*.J<XJ* 



L-RP Comm. 
4/20/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

sive percentage of faculty members. Mr. Lynton said the report 
was intended for discussion at the next meeting. The report, in 
effect, was an elaboration of the basic planning assumption to 
move in the direction of continuing education. There is a brief 
section on the present state of continuing education in the Com- 
monwealth. This section is a precis of a complete report which is 
available. While there is a great deal of continuing education 
going on, most of it is very traditional in both location and 
emphasis. 

The subcommittee, Mr. Lynton continued, addressed several 
issues — first, given the need for differentiation of mission, what: 
is the appropriate role of the University? It was agreed that the; 
University should either do that which it is uniquely qualified tcf 
do, because of speciality or level capacity, or innovative and 
imaginative programs. The report gives details of possible develop- 
ments in two broad categories, continuing professional development: 
and adult education. 

The report then deals with a dilemma common to all in- 
stitutions considering continuing education: whether to create 
new departments or faculties to perform the necessary functions 
or to tie the effort in with existing departments, etc. and slowly 
redirect current efforts. The committee opted for the latter. 

Finally, the report deals with a number of major policy 
and procedure questions, including the basic issue of funds. Mr. 
Lynton said it should be stressed that the committee did not 
expect the report to be adopted in toto by any one body. It was 
hoped that the Trustees, after study and deliberation, will endors 
the substance of the report. 



There was no further business to come before the Commit- 
tee, and the meeting was adjourned at 2:55 p.m. 



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Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys KeitlV Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE : 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

April 22, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Troy; Trustees Breyer 



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Burack, Crain; Ms. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding; 
Secretary Hardy; Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Batiste, Morgenthau and 
Winthrop 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Ms. Weiner, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs 
Mr. Cooley, Associate Vice President for Analytical Studies 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Puryear , Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 



and Provost; Mr. Allen, Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Fine 
Arts; Professor Hunt; Professor Blankenship; Professor Friedman, 



Faculty Representative; 
Association 



Mr. Hite, Co-President, Student Government 



UM/Boston : Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and 
Professor Fingeret; Professor Schwartz, Faculty Repre- 



Provost ; 
sentative 



UM/Worcester : Mr. Smith, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and 



Provost; Professor Smith, Faculty Representative 

Guest: Ms. Shukri, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 10:05 a.m. by 
Chairman Troy, who asked first that Mr. Lynton, Vice President 
for Academic Affairs, brief the Committee on the background of a 
request from the Collegiate Committee on Resources of the 
UM/Boston College of Liberal Arts to meet with the Trustee Com- 
mittee on Faculty and Educational Policy and the Executive Com- 
mittee. Mr. Lynton said that the faculty of the College of 
Liberal Arts had appointed that committee because of its concern 
about a request from the Chancellor that the College submit a 
contingency budget for FY78 which assumed a reduction in person- 
nel. He said the President and he had subsequently met with the 
faculty on that committee and had been able to clarify the 
situation and to somewhat allay their fears. He, therefore, 
believed the urgency of a meeting with the Trustees was now less. 






331 



UM/ Bos ton- 
Request to 
Make Presenta- 
tion to 
Committee 



w 5332 



F&EP Comm. 
4/22/77 



Executive 
Session 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Schwartz said that part of the problem was 
that in order to hire full-time faculty, it was necessary to do 
so by May, since most institutions require faculty to give notice 
of their intent to remain or to leave by that date. When decision's 
were made after that date, he said, it usually meant that only 
part-time faculty were available. In order to maintain academic 
quality in the College, he said, it was desirable to obtain more 
full-time faculty members. 

Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and 
Provost at UM/Boston, explained that due to the uncertainty of 
the budget, contingency planning had seemed prudent, and, therefore, 
the faculty had been requested to delay hiring personnel until 
the level of funding seemed more certain. He said he had since 
authorized the hiring of some key personnel. 



Ms. Bluestone asked why this was a matter for the 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy rather than the 
Committee on Budget and Finance, to which Professor Schwartz re- 
plied that the faculty had felt the matter had implications for 
the academic goals of the College. 

Mr. Lynton said it was unfortunate that the State budget, 
cycle and the academic hiring cycle did not mesh, but it was a 
situation which was beyond the control of the University. He 
added that it is the campus administration which would be held 
responsible should positions be authorized for which no funding 
was appropriated and it was only prudent management to proceed 
with caution. Also, he said, since the merger of the two liberal 
arts colleges took place last spring, there has been no thorough 
review of the various departments to learn if economies are 
possible without hurting academic programs, and he felt, he said, 
that there probably were instances where personnel could be 
reallocated without harm to the College. 

It was the sense of the meeting that no further action 
should be taken until Chairman Troy had an opportunity to speak 
with the Dean of the College. 

Chairman Troy then announced that since the first two 
items on the agenda concerned personnel matters, he would ask for 
a motion that the Committee deal with these in executive session, 
after which the Committee would reconvene in open session. On 
motion made and seconded at 10:15 a.m. on roll call, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To enter into executive session to discuss 
personnel matters. 

At 10:45 a.m. it was moved and seconded and 

VOTED: To end the executive session. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Troy first announced the actions taken in 
executive session. He said the Committee had on motion made and 
seconded 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
in the appointment by the President of Douglas 
Vickers as Professor of Economics with tenure 
at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 
as set forth in Doc. T77-091. 

Trustee Burack asked to be recorded in opposition to 
the vote for the reasons that she is unalterably opposed to the 
granting of tenure on initial appointments as a matter of policy 
because she feels it is unfair to junior faculty and detrimental 
to the University. 

Trustee Crain said that although he had voted for the 
appointment, he did have two concerns; the first, he said, was 
an objection to being asked to take action on a single appoint- 
ment without data which indicated how that appointment fit into 
the long-range plans of the campus and the University; the second , 
he said, was a lack of sensitivity to the need for affirmative 
action in the documentation provided, particularly in fields wher^ 
women have not gravitated in the past. He emphasized the need 
for role models which would attract women to fields from which 
they have in the past been excluded or discouraged. He said he 
would be taking a very strong interest in ensuring that in the 
future an aggressive posture is taken with regard to affirmative 
action in the hiring of personnel. 

The Committee, said Chairman Troy, had also dealt with 
a matter of sabbatical leave policy, and on motion made and 
seconded, it had unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees waive 
the requirement that Professor Suzanne Gassner 
return to the University on completion of her 
sabbatical leave on August 31, 1977. 

Chairman Troy said that because Provost Puryear could 
not stay for the entire meeting, he would reorder the agenda so 
as to discuss matters of concern to the Amherst campus before 
other items. He then asked Mr. Lynton to introduce the subject 
of Master Planning . Mr. Lynton said that in order to put current 
events into proper context, he would speak briefly about the 
history of the planning process at the University. In 1972, he 
said, the Board had adopted a new set of tenure criteria which 
contained in addition to the individual's qualifications the 
criterion of "institutional need." The Board policy specified 
that evaluation of "institutional need" had to be made within 
the context of long-range plans. 



-3- 



F&EP Coram. 
4/22/77 



UM/ Amherst — 
Concurrence 
in Appointment 
of Dr. Douglas 
Vickers as 
Professor of 
Economics with 
tenure 
(Doc. T77-091) 



UM/Boston — 
Waiver of 
Sabbatical 
Leave Policy 
for Suzanne 
Gassner 



Master 
Planning 



F&EP Comm. 
4/22/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The initial planning process had begun on the campuses 
in 1973, he said with two cycles having now been completed. 
Planning had been primarily at the departmental level with little 
synthesis at the college level and less at the campus level. In 
January, 1975, he said, the Trustees had met at Parkman House to 
discuss campus long-range plans. This had led to the February 
"planning exercise," which was an attempt at University-wide 
contingency planning. Then came the budget crisis and the 
planning process was aborted. The current cycle of planning was 
triggered last summer and fall by the President's Office, when 
the campuses were informed of the strong emphasis the Board had 
placed on the need for programmatic planning and the setting of 
priorities, and that the existence of long-range plans at an 
adequate level of detail and quality were a prerequisite to any 
consideration of tenure delegation. A fairly detailed first- 
stage set of plans had been received from UM/Amherst, he said, 
and a more general set of plans had been received from UM/Boston 
UM/Worcester had submitted a faculty plan which was in the process 
of being amplified. 

The first-stage campus plans submitted to the President' 
Office, Mr. Lynton said, had been reviewed by the Academic Affairs 
and Planning Offices and returned to the campuses for revision. 
At the same time, he said, the Planning Office developed a set 
of planning assumptions and "scenarios." These assumptions and 
scenarios were discussed, he said, within the President's Office, 
with the Chancellors and Provosts, and were submitted to the 
Trustee Committee on Long-Range Planning at its meeting on April 
20. After discussion, the Committee on Long-Range Planning had 
endorsed the assumptions and scenarios, which will now be forwarded 
to the Trustees for action at the May meeting. After discussion 
by the Board and approval or amendment, these planning assumptions 
will be forwarded to the campuses as a framework within which 
they are to develop the second cycle of long-range plans. 

The second-stage cycle of plans, he said, would go 
forward in two parts. The first part of the planning process 
would be requested by July in order that the Committee on Budget 
and Finance and the Board could use the information as a basis 
for consideration of the FY 1978 Operating Budget and the 
FY 1979 Maintenance Budget Request, with which they would be 
dealing in the late summer. At the same time, he said, the 
campus plans would be circulated on the campuses for broad con- 
sultation and review by October 1, so as to be available for the 
next cycle of personnel actions. 

As the Trustees were undoubtedly aware, he said, there 
had been strong reaction and considerable concern at UM/Amherst 
over the first-stage plans for that campus. This is due in part 
to a lack of understanding by the faculty that this is an initia 
process, and that plans are not in themselves action, but only 
a framework for action. There was, he said, confusion about the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

appropriate role that faculty should play in the development of 
the long-range plans. That this confusion has arisen, he said, is 
not surprising since this is the first time that a comprehensive 
master-planning process has been attempted; however, he said, the 
University Governance Document T73-098 clearly states that planning; 
is a primary responsibility of the administration. It speaks also 
of joint effort, but does not specify what that joint effort 
should be or how it should occur. It may be desirable, he said, 
to recommend to the Board that some additions or modifications to 
Doc. T73-098 be made in order to clarify this matter. 

The campus plans have not yet been submitted to the 
Board of Trustees, Mr. Lynton continued, for the very reason that 
they are first-stage plans. However, he said, he felt the Trustees 
should know that the UM/Amherst campus plan called for the re- 
allocation of approximately 40 to 50 positions over five years, 
from a total of 800, in the Arts and Sciences to the professional 
schools, which now have about 500 positions. 

Professor Schwartz said that he had expressed some con- 
cern about the opportunity of the faculty at UM/Boston to participate 
as fully as they might have in the development of the first-stage 
plans; however, he was more concerned about the second-stage 
planning process, particularly whether the President's Office 
would be indicating to the campuses the acceptability of their 
first-stage plans and what mechanism had been designed for faculty 
participation since the plan is due in July and the campus 
governance body does not meet in June and July. Replying to the 
first concern of Professor Schwartz, Mr. Lynton said that the 
President's Office had already responded to the campuses with 
regard to their first-stage plans. Mr. Steamer said that his 
office and the governance body on campus had agreed to put togethejr 
a faculty committee consisting of senior faculty from all colleges 
to work with administration over the summer on UM/Boston plans. 



Mr. Lynton said that it is primarily the responsibility 
of the administration to generate a long-range plan with consult- 
ation from a representative planning committee; once the plan has 
been completed, it is the responsibility of the administration to 
see that there is opportunity for widespread reaction. This 
opportunity for broad reaction is scheduled to occur between July 
and October. 



Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and 
Provost, UM/Amherst, said that at the Amherst campus the process 
for planning was already in place when he had arrived. However, 
he said, he did not think it was the process which had caused the 
consternation on campus. Rather, he said, it was the fact that 
the faculty had not actually expected that resources would be 
reallocated. He said he felt it would be very difficult for the 
faculty to agree on the reallocation of resources, since they would 
be more likely to make trade offs in order to protect their particular 



*-* f *y «-> *■- 



F&EP Coram . 
4/22/77 



-5- 



o 



338 



F&EP Comm. 
4/22/77 



UM/ Amherst — 

Basic 

Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

interests. Chairman Troy said that it was true that tunnel vision 
could exist and that there might be empires to be protected, but 
he said it was also important to consider the sensibilities of the 
very superior faculty on the campus. He said he felt the style 
in which the plans were presented, as well as the plans themselves 
was important. 

The faculty representatives from the three campuses 
expressed their views as to the importance of openness and the 
dissemination of information to the faculty at an earlier time in 
the process. Ms. Bluestone and Trustee Crain also emphasized the 
importance of sharing the facts with the entire University 
community. 

Trustee Burack noted the seeming lack of consensus at 
UM/Boston as to what the goals of the campus were, one group 
seeing the campus as responding to the needs of an urban communit 
while others seemed to feel it should follow a more traditional 
course. Until this was determined, she said, she thought planning 
was an exercise in futility. 



Mr. Lynton said there was no question that the implementa- 
tion process within Trustee approved guidelines or assumptions 
had to have the fullest participation of the faculty. In response 
to a question from Trustee Crain, Mr. Lynton said that the Master 
Planning process is a top down process in that the basic assumption 
and scenarios are developed by the President for Trustee approval 
and provided to the campuses as the planning parameters or frame- 
work within which to develop campus long-range plans . 



Chairman Troy expressed his view that the most important 
consideration was the overall goal, or philosophy, of the Univer- 
sity. He said to make changes simply in order to reflect the 
current job market would be in his opinion a grave error. Mr. 
Lynton said that the campus plans reflected the current reality 
of enrollment pressures, and that the campus administration, he 
felt, would be remiss if it did not attempt to rectify resource 
imbalance in the allocation of resources. 

Chairman Troy said that in order to get to other matters; 
on the agenda, it was necessary to conclude discussion of the 
master planning process. He said that the next item to be 
considered was the matter of Basic Education , which was a con- 
tinuation of a discussion begun at the last meeting. He asked 
that discussion begin with the Amherst campus in order that 
Mr. Puryear could participate before he had to depart. 

Mr. Puryear said that the campus had provided 
documentation at an earlier date, which he felt placed in context 
the current campus posture with respect to basic education. He 
said this was not a new concept for the Amherst campus. He then 
introduced members of the faculty who were in charge of the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

programs: Dr. John Hunt, Director of Special Programs; Jane 
Blankenship, Director of the Literacy Program; and Dean Jeremiah 
Allen of the School of Humanities and Fine Arts. 

Dr. Hunt said that since 1971 all students at UM/Amherst 
were required to take Rhetoric or to be specifically exempted 
from the course. The program, he said, had just undergone a 
major evaluation and the results are positive. He said the 
problem of students in the program is not one of literacy in the 
technical sense; that is, the students could write coherent 
sentences. The teaching staff in the Rhetoric program are mostly 
graduate students who have had teaching experience. The program 
is complemented by a Skills Center, to which students with 
particular problems are referred. About 700 students were 
referred to the Skills Center this past year, he said. Plans are 
under way, he said, to enlarge the Skills Center and to separate 
it from the Rhetoric program and make it available to the campus 
at large. 

Dr. Hunt said that the purpose of the Rhetoric program 
was to teach students to write to the extent of their ability. 
The Rhetoric program, he said, attempts to diagnose the students' 
problems and place them in the right program to enable each studer 
to reach his potential writing ability. He said it attempts to 
cover as broad a spectrum of subject matter as possible. 

Chairman Troy asked who the teachers were in the Rhetori 
program. Professor Blankenship replied that most of the teaching 
jwas done by teaching assistants and teaching associates, who are 
especially trained for the program. This year they came from 
twelve different departments. Half of the teaching staff came 
from the English Department, she said, and the others from a 
variety of disciplines as far-ranging as Communications Skills, 
Sociology, Psychology, Engineering, Botany, Comparative Literature 
and Linguistics. Last year one teacher was from the Marine Scienc 
Department. Other than the teaching assistants and associates, 
she said, volunteers from the English Department and other depart- 
ments also teach in the program. 

Trustee Burack asked how cooperative the faculty in the 
English Department were with regard to teaching writing. Dean 
Allen replied that the numbers of faculty participating in the 
Rhetoric program have fluctuated wildly, from a minimum of one in 
the spring of 1973 to a maximum of 30 in the fall of 1975. There 
are a number of people in the English Department who are primarily 
concerned with the teaching of writing. He said the most encouraging 
sign, he felt, was the steady growth of advanced expository writing, 
He said that this was the best indication of the English Department's 
commitment to the teaching of writing. The responsibility of the 
English Department for the teaching of writing has long been a 
subject of controversy, he said, between the Department and the 
Dean of Humanities and Fine Arts, but he said the attitude of the 






F&EP Comm. 
4/22/77 



-7- 



- 5338 

F&P Comm. 
4/22/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

English Department was changing under its new leadership and he is 
very hopeful that the Department will increasingly recognize its 
responsibility in the teaching of writing as well as in the teaching 
of literature. Trustee Burack asked if when faculty were hired ii 
the English Department they were informed that the teaching of 
writing would be part of their responsibility. Dean Allen repliec 
that this was rather an academic question, since no faculty had 
been hired recently in the English Department and the faculty had 
actually decreased from 112 FTE to 96 FTE. 

Trustee Burack said that many of the major colleges do 
have literacy problems and she was surprised to hear that this was 
not so at UM/Amherst. Dr. Hunt said that when he said the campus 
did not have a literacy problem, he meant the basic ability to 
write sentences. He said the campus did have a problem with the 
ability of students to think logically and the faculty in all 
departments are beginning to accept responsibility for attention 
to clarity of writing. 

Mr. Hite, Co-President of the Student Senate at UM/Amheifst 
said that he felt it was very important that the Rhetoric program 
be given to incoming freshmen. He said in many high schools, it 
was deemed more important that penmanship was neat than that the 
writing was correct and therefore it was important to correct 
writing skill deficiencies early in college. 

Professor Smith agreed with Mr. Hite and added that some: 
students come from homes in which they have never seen a parent 
sit down and write a letter and it was hard to convince such 
students of the necessity for skill in writing. Also, she said, 
she believed students would improve in their writing ability when 
they were writing about subjects of interest to them. 

Ms. Bluestone said that at the last meeting when discussion 
had taken place with regard to the teaching of basic writing skil! 
at UM/Boston, she had been interested to note that senior faculty 
were involved in the program. She said she felt this made a 
statement of commitment and asked for comment on this from the 
Amherst campus. Dr. Hunt said that some senior faculty did teach 
writing at UM/Amherst, but he thought a more important factor was 
that the people who could best do the job were teaching the subject. 



Professor Blankenship said that the mechanics of writing 
were important, but she said to start with the mechanics and not 
progress to other facets of writing decreased motivation. She 
had found, she said, that to start with the invent ional process 
was more satisfactory, which did not preclude teaching the 
mechanics . 

Trustee Burack asked if someone would explain the 
relationship on the campus among the departments of Rhetoric, 



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F&EP Comm. 
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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Communications, Journalism and those concerned with the overall 
teaching of English. She had read a statement in the Collegian 
that the Communications Department had no overlap with the 
Department of English. Professor Blankenship responded that the 
Basic Skills program is taught by on-loan faculty from Communication 
Skills and the English Department. However, she said, above the 
level of basic skills there is a clear separation between the 
departments of Communication Skills and Journalism. 

Professor Blankenship then went on to explain what was 
done in the Rhetoric course, and how students were exempted from 
it. She said there were four ways to determine whether a student 
could be exempted: 1) by passing a test, 2) by writing satisfactory 
diagnostic essays, 3) by virtue of their SAT scores, and 4) by 
evidence of previous experience in the field of writing. Those 
who do take the course, also have a series of options. If studen 
have difficulty in writing sentences, they are referred to the 
Communication Skills Center. If the student has a particular 
problem, such as organization, that student is also referred to the 
j Skills Center. Those who remain in the Rhetoric course, she said, 
also have several options and she described the courses which stu- 
dents could elect. She said about 30 percent of the freshmen were 
exempted each year from the course. Another 600 or so have to be 
turned away because of lack of space in the course. This fact 
was a cause of concern which was under study by the Academic Affafrs 
Committee, said Dr. Hunt. 

Trustee Crain asked if the campus had statistics on how 
many students had not taken the Rhetoric course. Mr. Cooley, 
Associate Vice President for Analytical Studies, replied that the 
computer at the present time did not have the capacity to determine 
this figure. Dr. Hunt said that a backlog of upper classmen who 
have not met the Rhetoric requirement number from 600 to 2,000 
students . 

Trustee Breyer asked if there was at present a plan in 
place which would determine whether there would be more money 
allocated to the Rhetoric program. Mr. Lynton replied that the 
Committee on Long-Range Planning specifically said that with the 
changing character of the student body more resources would have 
to be allocated to student support services. 

Professor Fingeret, who was present for the purpose of 
reporting on the teaching of Basic Skills at UM/Boston' s College 
of Public and Community Service, expressed concern that again tim^ 
had run out before she could speak and it was agreed that she 
would be first on the agenda at the next meeting of the Committee 

Chairman Troy then asked for action on the Change in UM/Boston-- 

Name of College of Liberal Arts to College of Arts and Sciences — j Change in 

UM/Boston (Doc. T77-084) . He said the faculty of the college and! Name of 

the Dean had felt that the name should be changed to indicate morfe College to 



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"5340 



F&EP Comm. 
4/22/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



College of Arts 
and Sciences 



clearly that all the sciences are now part of the unit. This 
recommendation, he said, had received the approval of the Uni' 
(Doc. T77-084) versity Assembly and of the Chancellor. On motion made and 

seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of trustees 
redesignate the College of Liberal Arts 
at the University of Massachusetts at Boston 
as the College of Arts and Sciences, as set 
forth in Doc. T77-084. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:36 p.m. 



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Su 





Assistants/Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board 
of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE: 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS 

April 22, 1977; 1:00 p.m. 

Room SF1-4 
Medical Sciences Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Robertson; Ms. Kaplan 
representing Trustee Okin; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Fielding, Gordon, McNeil, 
McNulty and Shearer 

Office of the President : Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for 
University Policy; Ms. Veith, Senior Associate for Academic 
Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Professor Friedman, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Dr. Catlin, Research Director; 
Dr. Marlowe, Project Director, Satellite Clinic at Uxbridge; 
Ms. McGowan, Administrative Coordinator; Mr. Fellner, Assistant 
Controller; Mr. Ference, Administrator, Group Practice Plan; 
Mr. Kelly, Associate Dean for Allied Health 

Guests : Mr. Flynn, Arthur Young & Co.; Mr. Millar, Wyatt Company 

The meeting was called to order at 1:18 p.m. Chairman 
Robertson called upon the Chancellor for his comments. Chancellor 
Bulger said that a document further elaborating the operations of 
the Group Practice Plan was being prepared and would in due cours^ 
be presented to the Committee. A few years ago, he continued, 
part of the Department of Community and Family Medicine was split 
off and became the Department of Family Practice. While this 
sundering resulted in some good things, on the whole it was not 
successful. Last fall the Chairman of the new Department resigned 
and Dr. Catlin became Acting Chairman. 

Concurrent with the establishment of a search committee 
for a permanent chairman of the Department of Family Practice, 
Dr. Fullmer, Associate Dean for Clinical and Primary Care and 
Chairman of the Department of Community and Family Medicine, 
announced his impending resignation as Chairman and recommended 
that the two departments be recombined with Dr. Catlin as Chair- 
man. After due consideration over several months, the decision 
was finally made yesterday to recombine the two departments. In 
order to forestall confusion with the former Department of Community 
and Family Medicine, the new combination will be called the Depar 
ment of Family and Community Medicine. Dr. Catlin will be Chair- 
man. 



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0-4jtJL 



UM/Worcester- 
Chancellor 's 
Comments 



Merger of 
Departments of 
Family Practice 
and Community 
and Family 
Medicine 



5342 



Health Affairs 
4/22/77 



Medical School 
Finances 



Affirmative 

Action 

Programs 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Robertson said he had been a Trustee when the 
split had been made and was not too happy with it. At that time, 
he said, part of the reason for the split was that this was a 
growing trend in medical schools. He asked if this was still the 
case. Chancellor Bulger said there were more departments where 
| the two clinical specialties were separate than where they were 
combined. However, there are many of the latter. He said that 
no family practitioner interested in training more family 
practitioners could expect much support at the usual medical 
school. This resulted in pressures to form a department in order 
to have some clout with the administration. Also, in combined 
departments, there was the hazard that the interests of family 
practice would be submerged because of the cachet of research 
capability worn by community medicine. Chancellor Bulger said 
that this was why Dr. Catlin's appointment as chairman was so 
fortuitous — he was a family practitioner who was accepted and 
respected by specialists in community medicine. In addition, 
the combined department would be able to attract more experts 
than could separate departments. 

On the matter of the Medical School's finances, Chan- 
cellor Bulger continued, he could only report that he had attended 
a legislative hearing but did not know what would result. The most 
significant thing was that Secretary Parks had amended his position 
and now was in favor of the Hospital's being financially split of: 
in some way, in having a revolving fund and a subsidy as well as 
a $3 million education subsidy. The Chancellor said he thought 
the Secretary meant to say a $3 million deficiency appropriation 
for the Hospital. Finally, he reported, the Secretary said the 
Hospital should be allowed to spend up to $16.8 million in 
FY 78. That figure was based on the Rate Setting Commission's 
finding that the income projections of the Hospital were basically 
correct and valid. The Hospital had requested $18.8 million. 
The RSC indicated the lower figure was adequate; however, since 
the Medical Center had not yet had final discussions with the RSC 
no other comments would be appropriate at this time. Mr. Eller 
said that the University was still waiting for word on the 
deficiency appropriation. Also, as the Chancellor had said, 
Secretary Parks had agreed to the revolving fund concept for the 
fiscal operation of the Hospital. Formulation of the proposal 
to activate such a fund was now ongoing in the Chancellor's 
Office and the President's Office and would thereafter be 
appropriately forwarded. 

Chancellor Bulger said campus affirmative action programs 
were continuing to develop. The Affirmative Action Officer had 
compiled the necessary statistics and a process necessary to 
address the problem areas that had been disclosed was now available, 
The next step would be to devise a comprehensive plan. Ms. Kaplai 
asked if there was an affirmative action effort directed at re- 
cruiting students. Chancellor Bulger said that while there 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

were problems in the area of students, there were also some 
successes — 36 percent of last year's entering class were women. 
The School had not had great success in recruiting black students 
One reason for this was the requirement that students be residents 
of the Commonwealth, another is location. He said the best hope 
for improvement was a program in conjunction with UM/Boston. The 
program was aimed at enabling students attending UM/Boston to 
become competitive applicants to the Medical School. During thei;: 
undergraduate years, the students would be familiarized and 
become comfortable with the Worcester campus and would want to 
apply. 

The meeting then turned to the third item on the agenda 
Group Practice Fringe Benefits (Doc. T77-090). Chairman Robertsoiji 
noted that the support material had been forwarded to the Trustees 
and asked if there were any comments. Mr. Ference said the 
benefits were consistent with those afforded by other publicly 
supported medical schools. 

Chairman Robertson said he was interested in technical 
aspects of the implementation of the benefit program and its 
relationship to the cash flow of the Group Practice. Mr. Ference 
said that this program, as opposed to the one it replaced, 
centered around the clinical department rather than the individual 
The benefits will be funded in two ways — the compulsory benefits 
and the elective, or "cafeteria" benefits; funds for both will be 
allocated prior to physician compensation. They will, in effect, 
be guaranteed by the net available capital that the group will 
earn. Chairman Robertson asked if the compulsory benefits were 
to be implemented immediately upon approval. Mr. Ference said 
this was so. On July 1, 1977 these benefits would be funded for 
all members of the group, the amount will represent between 2 and 
2.5 percent of the group's total compensation. The funds are 
secured in the flow of departmental budgeting. 

Chancellor Bulger said that one fundamental aspect of 
the new plan is that if, at any time after the compulsory benefit^ 
have been funded, the income of the group falls below the level 
necessary for the group's compensation, the resultant shortfall 
will be shared by all. 

Chairman Robertson asked if members were required to 
spend 10 percent of their total yearly compensation on compulsory 
and cafeteria benefits. Mr. Ference said it should be understood 
that the benefits were in addition to compensation rather than 
part of it. Everyone had to take the compulsory benefits; 
additional benefits would be elective and could amount to as much 
as 10 percent of compensation, but not exceed this figure. 



As a point of information, the Chairman asked if any 
of the people in the Group Practice were covered by social security. 



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~ 5.343 



Health Affairs 
4/22/77 



Group Practice 
Fringe Bene- 
fits 
(Doc. T77-090) 



5L.1J«>^t4 



Health Affairs 
4/22/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Millar said some members, by reason of previous employment, 
might have such coverage. Chairman Robertson said that programs 
where participants had both long-term disability insurance and 
social security usually had built in offsets, so that people did 
not have greater incomes when disabled than when working. He 
said he did not see such offsets in the plan being discussed. Mr, 
Millar said that it was possible that a physician who had social 
security benefits prior to joining the Group Practice could retire 
on disability and receive benefits of 100 percent or more of his 
earned income. Chairman Robertson asked if there was any reason 
why social security should not be added as an offset where it did 
apply. Mr. Millar said the general feeling was, that because social 
security was not earned when employed by the University, it was 
irrelevant to the benefit package offered through the University. 5 
He noted that it was possible that physicians have their own 
personal l.t.d. coverage, this was but one thing which could push 
a person's disability payments over 100 percent of previous 
earnings. There were a number of such things over which the 
University had no control. It was felt that factoring possible 
social security benefits into the plan would mean that some 
physicians would receive comparatively lesser value through the 
plan than others simply because of the nature of their previous 
employment. Chairman Robertson said that this aspect of the plan 
would allow for a situation where one person who had worked for 
the University all during his working career could be retired on 
disability at 65 percent of salary, while another person who had 
spent only part of his career at the University could retire at 
110 percent. Mr. Flynn said it should be noted that the person 
in the latter instance had made voluntary social security payment^. 

The most significant point, Mr. Millar said, was the 
University's concern that somebody would be able to earn more 
when disabled than when actively employed. He said he did not see 
this happening because of the impact of inflation. The benefits 
under the l.t.d. were fixed dollar amounts, determined as of the 
date of disability. Social security benefits, on the other hand, 
increase with the cost of living. He said inflation would quickljr 
reduce the l.t.d. benefits to a level less than 100 percent of 
salary and thus could not be seen as a negative incentive. Mr. 
Flynn asked if it were not the case that insurance companies were 
very careful to watch programs of this kind to make sure that 
people on disability pay were genuinely disabled and unable to 
work. Mr. Millar said that if the benefit were big enough, the 
retiree's pulse was taken every day. Chairman Robertson said the 
point that physicians in private practice had paid into social 
security was well taken. He asked what the payments amounted to 
per year. Mr. Flynn said the physician paid the total amount, 
this totalled $1,209 in 1976. 



There was no further discussion and it was moved and 
seconded, and 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To concur with the Committee on Budget and 
Finance in recommending that the Board of 
Trustees approve the fringe benefit plan 
for the Group Practice Plan as set forth 
in Doc. T77-090. 

The meeting then turned to the next item on the agenda, 
Group Practice: AHMAC Contract — UM/Worcester . Chancellor Bulger 



o«545 



Health Affairs 
4/22/77 



UM/ Wore ester — 
AHMAC Contract 



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said that in both the Hospital and the Group Practice Plan 
collection for services rendered was a matter that for some time 
was attended to later in the course of meeting problems and 
responsibilities. As had been reported to the Board in November, 
1976, this resulted in numerous problems, chief of which was a 
large backlog of accounts receivable. The billing system was 
reviewed and found adequate and it was determined that lack of 
staff expertise was the main cause of the breakdown and billing 
system. Talks were held with staff of the American Hospital 
Management Assistance Corporation of Ardmore, Pennsylvania and 
AHMC was selected to provide personnel for the processing of 
accounts receivable. 

In August, 1976, Chancellor Bulger continued, $100,000 
in receivables was collected and in March, 1977, $1.1 million was 
collected. This increase stemmed from the availability of people | 
to do the necessary work in billing and collection. On the Group I 
Practice Plan side, Chancellor Bulger said, Mr. Ference, administra- 
tor of the plan, had straightened out many similar problems there , 

The Medical Center, he continued, had a contract with 
the Department of Public Health which allowed physicians at the 
hospital at Pondville to come onto the Worcester faculty and to 
use the AHMAC managed billing system; this enabled Pondville to 
achieve a similarly dramatic turnabout in its collections. Mr. 
Ference said that in the case of the Departments of Pathology at 
Worcester and Pondville, and the Department of Radiology at 
Worcester, the AHMAC had cleared up a six-month backlog in two 
months, and very good collections were projected to continue. 

Mr. Eller said the AHMAC contract and the just discussed 
fringe benefits plans had been developed as the result of great 
efforts on the part of Mr. Ference and others. The benefits of 
this work were becoming apparent in the collections process and 
the group practice plan was now beginning to look very healthy an<| 
to conform to projected income. He said it would take 18 months 
to have income match costs, but it was now possible to predict with 
some certainty that this would happen. Chairman Robertson asked if 
the ultimate goal was to have an in-house capability for the 
collections operation. Mr. Ference said this was the expectation 



The Chairman said that while the matter of the AHMAC 
was for discussion only, he felt the Committee would concur in the 
worth of the program. Ms. Kaplan said there was a need to be 



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5346 



Health Affairs 
4/22/77 



Satellite 
Clinic at 
Uxbridge 
(Doc. T77-093) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

responsive to the General Court as regards revenues and costs, 
and that the Medical Center seemed very organized in these matter 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Satellite 
Clinic at Uxbridge . Dr. Marlowe said the Uxbridge project 
involved many of the clinical departments at the Medical School: 
Family Practice, Community Medicine, Pediatrics, and Internal 
Medicine, and the Administration and even some Buildings and 
Grounds personnel, and an incorporated community board to look 
at the problem of health care delivery in a seven town area in the 
Blackstone Valley. 

In 1975, Dr. Marlowe continued, a number of residents 
of the Blackstone Valley contacted the Medical Center for assistance 
in attracting physicians to the area. Coincidentally , a statewide 
survey of primary care physician distribution had just been 
completed; the survey showed the area to be one of the most severely 
underserved areas in the state. Efforts to recruit physicians had 
been going on for 10 years and had been unsuccessful. One of the 
Medical School's missions is to alleviate the physician mal- 
distribution problems and this seemed an obvious target area. Also, 
at that time, the Medical School had been seeking off-campus 
sites for residency programs in internal medicine and pediatrics. 

Further meetings were held with state human services 
agencies and the communities. The upshot of these was an agree- 
ment that what would best meet the needs of the area would be a 
partnership between the Medical School and the communities to 
develop a model primary care teaching practice, sited in the center 
most town — Uxbridge. 

The primary objective of the practice was to provide 
comprehensive, convenient and continuous quality health care for 
both hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients. Hospitalized 
patients would receive treatment either at the local hospital or 
at the Teaching Hospital as their treatment needs dictated. The 
proposal met with approval from the local doctors and the communi 



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Ms. McGowan said a great deal of time and thought had 
been given to efforts to ensure that the program would operate cost 
effectively and be self-supporting, partly through maximizing thiird 
party reimbursements. 

The Center, Ms. McGowan continued, would be operated 
jointly by the Hospital and the community. Two acres of land had 
been donated to the project and a fund-raising drive was being 
undertaken by the community to gather construction funds. Also, 
a mortgage would be sought. The University intends to seek a 
grant through HEW's Local Health Initiative. If these efforts ar 
successful, it will be possible to defray initial operating 
expenses and start-up costs, so that by the fourth year of operation 
the Center will break even. The University will pay rent to the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

center and thus help defray the cost of mortgage payments. 

Chancellor Bulger said Ms. McGowan and Dr. Marlowe had 
been working for a long time on this project. At one point, they 
had secured a $125,000 foundation grant, but this had to be turned 
back as the requisite $350,000 in matching funds could not be 
raised. The reason the money could not be raised was that the 
Medical Center did not have the necessary staff and expertise to 
generate support from the private sector. This had been at least 
partially remedied and Medical Center staff and executives in the 
community are now working together. He said he could not predict 
the success of the center, but there was an exciting combination 
of people working toward that end. Mr. Eller said that there werej 
a number of requests for similar programs throughout the state, 
and the Uxbridge center as a pilot program and model held a great 
promise. He said it was enthusiastically recommended by the 
University administration. 

In reply to Ms. Kaplan's question, Ms. McGowan said the 
total capital outlay for the center would be $350,000. Ms. Kaplar 
asked if primary mental health service would be offered in the 
center or if other arrangements to afford such service had been 
considered. Ms. McGowan said much time had been spent with all 
human service agencies in the Valley, particularly the adult 
counseling services and a plan for some concerted effort was being 
discussed. Dr. Marlowe said these efforts were still in the 
proposal stage, but there had been a memorandum of intent to 
utilize all local human services agencies to the extent possible 



Chairman Robertson said he was very much in favor of the 
concept and it seemed to be directly related to some of the statec 
missions of UM/Worcester . He said it was his understanding that 
all aspects of constructing the facility including all financing 
were the responsibility of the community corporation; that the 
building will then be leased to the University Hospital, and that 
the Hospital would charge for services. Dr. Marlowe said the 
Chairman's understanding was correct. Chairman Robertson then 
asked if expenses would reflect the total cost of operating the 
center. Ms. McGowan said this was also correct. 



Assuming the grant to be sought is forthcoming, Chairman 
Robertson said, the Hospital will, in a sense, be underwriting 
the first three years' operation. At the end of year four, there 
will be a profit. He asked where the profit would go. Ms. McGowan 
said it would go to the Medical Center, with the intention that ii: 
would be used for services at the Uxbridge Center. 

Dr. Catlin said he found the prospect of the center 
exciting — it was different from family practice centers established 
in the past in that it would be staffed by family physicians as 
well as primary care physicians in other disciplines, and it woul<p. 
be partially funded, in the beginning, by grants secured by the 



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Health Affairs 
4/22/77 



5« 



Health Affairs 
4/22/77 



Hospital 
Rate 

Increases 
(Doc. T77-089) 



Authorization 
to Use Blue 
Cross Current 
Financing 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University from outside sources. There were a number of advantages 
to the Medical School in this — the center would allow studies of 
the way in which care is delivered from the physician's point of 
view and analyses of cost effectiveness. Dr. Marlowe said it 
should be noted that the financial projections had been analyzed 
by an outside firm, Ernst & Ernst, and had been judged conservative 
Chancellor Bulger said that the record should show that the Medical 
School was trying to provide a number of available places for the 
first postgraduate training year equal to the number of graduates 
of that year. 

There was no further discussion and it was moved and 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the Chancellor of the Medical Center to submit 
together with the Tri-River Family Health Center 
Development Corporation a Determination of Need 
Application to the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health and to conduct such negotiations 
as are necessary to establish a primary care 
teaching practice in Uxbridge, MA, as set forth 
in Doc. T77-093; provided, however, that the 
Trustees shall review said program prior to the 
Chancellor's signing any contract with the 
Tri-River Family Health Center Development 
Corporation on behalf of the Medical Center. 

The meeting then turned to the next item on the agenda, 
Hospital Matters: Hospital Rate Increases, and Blue Cross Current 



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Financing . Chairman Robertson pointed out that both matters were 
the primary responsibility of the Committee on Budget and Finance 
and were on the agenda for purposes of information. Chancellor 
Bulger said it was proposed to raise hospital rates a weighted 
average of 10 percent, effective June 1, 1977. These increases, 
while still not bringing the Hospital's charges in line with costs, 
would provide needed revenues. He noted that charges were under 
continuous review and would be modified if at all possible. 

The authorization to use Blue Cross Current Financing 
proposal was simply a device to improve the timely flow of 
revenues to the Commonwealth. 



There being no further business to come before the 
Committee, the meeting was adjourned at 3:10 p.m. 




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Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of 

Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

May 4, 1977; 9:00 a.m. 

Room 308 
Administration Building 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 



Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Spiller; President Wood; 
Trustees Burack, Clark, Dennis, McNulty and Romer; Secretary 
Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Miller, recorder 



Committee Members Absent: Trustee Winthrop 



Office of the President: Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Plan- 



ning; Mr. Brigham, Senior University Planner; Ms. Hanson, Assis- 
tant Vice President and Budget Director 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Littlefield, Planning Director; Professor 
Sulzner, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Meehan, Planning Director; 
Mr. Prince, Planning Office 

UM/Worcester : Professor Smith, Faculty Representative 

Guest : Ms. Eddy, Vice Chairman, Amherst Board of Selectmen 



The meeting was called to order at 9:10 a.m. Chairman 
Spiller welcomed Trustee Romer to her first Committee meeting. 
He then turned to the first item on the agenda, Tillson Power 
Plant : Issues and Options — UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-097) . Ms. 
Robinson said the Committee and the Board had for some time 
dealt with the difficult problems of the Tillson Power Plant. 
As one result of a recent meeting at Amherst, she said, there 
was some very good news for a change. At the meeting there was 
a consensus that there were two different ways of meeting the 
heating and air-conditioning needs of the campus. Both were 
technically feasible and both covered the other major issue of 
reliability. 



J349 



One option, Ms. Robinson continued, was to make only 
absolutely necessary improvements to the Tillson plant and the 
new tie lines. It was estimated that these improvements would 
enable the plant to function at an acceptable level of reliabil- 
ity for 15 years, at the end of which time the tie lines would be 
due for replacement and desirable improvements as well as neces- 
sary ones could be made, resulting in a higher degree of reliabil- 
ity. 



UM/Amherst — 
Tillson Power 
Plant 
(Doc. T77-097) 



350 



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Buildings 
and Grounds 
5/4/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The other option, she said, was to improve the cur- 
rently operating coal-fired plant to the point where it could 
meet air quality standards and serve campus utility needs for an 
additional 10 or 15 years, at which time boiler replacement on 
a phased schedule would, as in the proposal for the Tillson 
Plant, result in greater reliability. Ms. Robinson pointed out 
that the tables in the document at hand showed the dramatic 
reversal in the prices of coal and oil over the last few years. 
The increased cost of oil had made it necessary for the Amherst 
campus to introduce stringent conservation efforts. As a result 
of these efforts, energy demands had been reduced to a level 
within the capacity of the coal-fired plant. The second option, 
given the national emphasis on the use of coal rather than oil, 
came at a timely moment. Ms. Robinson concluded by noting that 
Mr. Littlefield and Mr. Meehan, who had done a great deal of 
work on the options, were present and would answer any questions. 

Ms. Burack asked how soon the work could begin. Ms. 
Robinson said a meeting had recently been held with coal-fired 
engineering consultants. They will report very quickly and it 
is expected that they will agree that pollution control standards 
can be met at a cost of $1.3 to $1.8 million, and that this can 
be done in from 15 to 21 months. A firm date will be included 
in their report. Trustee McNulty asked why no consideration 
had been given to either plant having the capacity to generate 
electricity. Mr. Littlefield said that the coal-fired plant 
could generate electrical power if sufficient manpower were 
available. This calculation was not included in the Tillson 
option because there were cheaper alternatives available. Ms. 
Robinson pointed out that the steam arriving at the turbines 
from the Tillson plant was too wet for generation purposes. 
Chairman Spiller said that electrical power generation had not 
been included in the analysis because the Tillson plant was not 
designed to generate electricity; therefore, for purposes of 
valid comparisons, this capacity had been ignored. 

There then ensued a discussion on the dramatic reversal 
of the comparative costs of coal and oil. There was general 
agreement that coal, taking all factors into account, was 
prefereable to oil. 

Chairman Spiller said that if the Trustees determined 
that the coal-fired plant should be kept in operation, this 
would raise political and legislative problems about the Tillson 
plant. He asked how this "elephant" could be handled. Ms. 
Robinson said the decision to improve the coal-fired plant would 
be neither indefensible or irrevocable. The capital investment 
necessary would be repaid through fuel cost savings within two 
or three years. The Tillson plant could be mothballed and if, 
as was entirely possible, technical innovations such as the 
gassif ication of coal became realities, Tillson could be reactic- 
ated. Given the repayment of the capital investment in the coal- 
fire plant, the University will not have suffered a financial 
loss. 



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Chairman Spiller said he did not think his question 
had been answered. A step by step process of actions to be 
taken should be laid out. For example, should the Trustees pur- 
sue the matter of legal action regarding the Tillson's mal- 
functioning with the Bureau of Building Construction? Ms. 
Robinson said it was necessary to meet with the BBC to discuss 
this matter. 

The Chairman then said he felt it was necessary to 
publicly assign the faults of the Tillson plant to those respon- 
sible for those faults. Also, it should be made obvious why 
the change was being made and what was being done with the Till- 
son plant. If this were not done, the University could be placed 
in an embarrassing position. Trustee Burack suggested that it 
would be wise to have people other than the Trustees — for 
example, members of the BBC and the leadership of the legisla- 
ture — join in issuing such a statement. The Chairman suggested 
asking the Governor to issue a statement announcing that 
UM/Amherst was going to continue to use coal at its contribution 
to solving the national energy crisis. Trustee Burack said 
making a virtue out of a liability always made good sense. 

President Wood said that the issue had to be addressed 
publicly and should be placed in the context of the national 
energy situation. Trustee McNulty said the fact that the Till- 
son plant had never been accepted by the Board and was still 
the BBC's building should be stated and stated repeatedly. She 
asked if it was possible that the plant would never be accepted 
and was told this was the case. 

Treasurer Johnson said he felt the efforts to get the 
tie lines repaired should be pursued with the BBC. Also, it 
should be made known that making the plant and the tie line 
usable would take so long that interim measures had to be taken. 
He said it was the BBC's responsibility to find the necessary 
funds . 

Ms. Robinson said it was necessary to decide on a 
course of action that was within already appropriated funds and 
which would enable the campus to comply with pollution control 
standards. She noted that some additional investment would 
have to be made in the tie lines in order to mothball them. If 
this were not done, the tie lines would be worthless in five 
years. 

Trustee Clark said the interests of the town of 
Amherst should be considered in whatever decision was made. 
Trustee Romer said the town was now living with the problem 
of emissions from the present plant that were greater than 
those anticipated under the option being considered. In that 
sense the town would be better off. She said that she had talked 



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Buildings 
and Grounds 
5/4/77 



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with Mr. Littlef ield about the University's power plants — 
specifically, the ultimate fate of the Tillson plant; the 
relatively minor issue of the traffic of the coal trucks; and 
the major issue of air pollution. This last issue was a major 
one because the campus now burned low sulphur coal; but there 
was no guarantee that this would always be done, and coal could 
contain as yet unidentified additional pollutants. 

Trustee Dennis said he favored pursuing the matter of 
Tillson. If the decision were made to mothball the plant, this 
should not change the Trustees' determination to issue a state- 
ment to the BBC as to the condition of the plant and recommen- 
dations as to what should be done. Chairman Spiller said this 
was a many-sided issue and while the Committee seemed to be 
tending toward recommending the upgrading of the coal-fired plant 
the University should return to the Committee with recommend- 
ations on the loose ends which had just been discussed. Trustee 
Dennis said he felt there was reluctance on the part of the 
President's Office staff to take on BBC, partly because of the 
fear that taking issue with the BBC on current problems would 
create more problems in the future. On the other hand, the 
Trustees favored taking a firmer stance, if only on paper. 
President Wood said the problems with the BBC were common when 
dealing with a large bureaucracy. The University had tried in 
the past few years to develop working relationships with the 
BBC at the professional level so as to get a modicum of coopera- 
tion. When errors were made, the BBC's first thought was, 
naturally, to protect itself. 

Trustee Crain said he had once managed a large number 
of buildings, but had never seen a situation like that the 
University was in. He said he was appalled by the number of 
outstanding problems having to do with buildings. Chairman 
Spiller said that despite the difficulty of pinning the BBC 
down, and even if it was decided to continue operating the old 
power plant, the University, as Trustee Dennis said, should 
continue to pressure the BBC on Tillson. Trustee Clark asked if 
it would be possible to have members of the BBC meet with the 
Committee. Ms. Robinson said it would be helpful to separate 
the question of action on the Tillson plant from the long list 
of grievances the University had with the Bureau. The power 
plant was a matter of urgency and could not be delayed for 
several months. 

It would be necessary to get legal advice as to the 
effect of a decision to upgrade the old plant on the liability 
situation with regard to Tillson, Ms. Robinson continued. The 
BBC had so far refused to take legal action against the designers 
of the Tillson plant, contending that the problems derived from 
a number of sources, including the manner in which the plant was 
started up. The only way to resolve that question, according to 
the BBC, she said, was to repair and test the Tillson plant and 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

then start it up in a different fashion. This would cost about 
$1.5 million, including $400,000 for oil used in the testing 
and start up processes. If the Trustees decided not to accept 
this option, it would mean asking the lawyers to produce a 
written record, such as Trustee Dennis had proposed, that would 
clearly describe the events leading up to the decision to moth- 
ball the plant. 

She said she would wager that the BBC would urge the 
University to go forward with the Tillson option and would recom- 
mend even fewer repairs than were contained in the document at 
hand. This would force the campus to live with the added fuel 
costs and with a less satisfactory power plant. She said if the 
coal-fired plant option were chosen, the University would have 
to be prepared to persuade the BBC to agree. 

President Wood said that in discussing the status of 
the University's physical facilities, it should be noted that 
the University Building Authority, as well as the BBC was in- 
volved. The Building Authority dealt with dormitory and other 
self-amortizing construction and last year had made a major 
effort to resolve problems which were the backwash of very rapid 
construction over the last decade. 

In the process of state financed construction, con- 
sultant and architectural choices were essentially dependent on 
the state's Designer Selection Board. Construction was overseen 
by the BBC. In the case of the Boston campus, President Wood 
continued, as well as Amherst and Worcester, the issues the 
Committee was dealing with were partly the result of the volume 
of construction — over $300 million worth in the past seven years. 
The University's only recourse in these problem areas was to 
refuse to accept buildings until they were satisfactory. The 
University then had the responsibility of stating clearly and 
publicly the reasons for its actions. 

Trustee Clark said that as a reasonably law-abiding 
citizen and not as a Trustee, she would be appalled if the 
University did not demand some accounting of the responsibility 
for the problems of the $10 million Tillson power plant. She 
said the University would be severely criticized if this matter 
were not explained fully and, if necessary, taken to a grand 
jury. Whatever decision was made, she concluded, the issue of 
the Tillson plant should not be ignored. Chairman Spiller said 
he had always insisted that the record of the Committee include 
reference to problems of this nature. 

Ms Robinson said that if the Trustees wanted to pro- 
ceed with the Tillson plant so as to avoid misunderstandings 
and possible criticism that would result from deciding to con- 
tinue use of the coal-fired plant, this decision would have to 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

be made quickly. In deciding this, she stressed, the Trustees 
should be aware that the Tillson could not be converted to coal 
and that the estimates of the additional operating costs of an 
oil-fired plant were $1 million per year for a period of at least 
five years. She noted that if Tillson were operational, the 
present issue would never have been raised. 

Trustee Dennis said the choice of which plant to oper- 
ate and the question of accountability were separable points, 
and the matter of accountability had to be pursued. Mr. 
Littlefield asked if it would be possible to decide which plant 
to modify and then take up accountability for the Tillson plant 
problems. Trustee Burack said a public debate with the parties 
involved in the Tillson controversy should be held at the same 
time as the decision on which plant to operate was being made. 

What is being said to the President's staff, Chairman 
Spiller stressed, is that the Trustees want a hard and strong 
position put together on these issues and presented to the 
Committee as quickly as possible. President Wood said he inter- 
preted the Trustees' attitude to be, in effect, a desire for a 
statement indicating that they could not operate in an environ- 
ment where the BBC performs the way it does. All segments of 
public higher education in the Commonwealth, he continued, had 
had problems with the BBC. As the Committee had been told 
previously, any effort to establish a separate public higher 
education building authority would get support from all the 
segments. 

Chairman Spiller said the Trustees wanted the admin- 
istration to produce specific recommendaitons that would speak 
to the advantages and disadvantages of both power plants and of 
possible consequences of each option. If, as the sense of the 
meeting seemed to be, the coal-fired plant was to be preferred, 
this recommendation should be presented in a way that would not 
forestall action on the accountability issue. 

The meeting then turned to the next item on the agenda, 
Seawater Cooling System — UM/Boston. Mr. Meehan reminded the 
Committee that at the last meeting a schedule showing the time 
necessary to rehabilitate the seawater system had been presented. 
At this meeting, he said, he was able to report that the work 
was progressing exactly on schedule. It was expected that the 
project would be ready to go to bid in September, 1977. Francis 
Associates, the design engineers, had devised a plan where all 
the necessary equipment would be housed in existing buildings. 
This would result in substantial cost savings. Earlier plans 
for the project had envisioned new construction. The only prob- 
lem, Mr. Meehan continued, stemmed from the fact that the BBC 
had not expected the design work to be completed within the 
scheduled time. For this reason, the project had not been con- 



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Seawater 
Cooling System 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

sidered urgent and the necessary capital outlay had not been 
appropriated. If the project was to continue on schedule, the 
outlay would have to be available in the coming September or 
October. The BBC, he continued, would now support the appro- 
priation, and efforts would have to be made in the legislature 
to see that it was forthcoming. 

There then ensued a brief discussion on the legal 
liability of those involved in the design and construction of 
the system. 

The meeting then turned to the next item on the agenda, 
Energy Conservation Appropriation — UM/Boston. Mr. Meehan said 
he had one favorable comment to make on the BBC — from their own 
funds they had allotted the University $160,000 plus design fees 
to upgrade the supervisory data system. The system monitors and 
controls energy consumption on the campus. It was hoped the up- 
grading would be completed in the fall. Additional fuel cost 
savings of from $150,000 to $200,000 were anticipated. 

In the matter of the Library Roof — UM/Boston, Mr. 
Prince said the BBC would select a new designer for the roof in 
June. UM/Boston had hoped that the original designer would do 
the necessary work. However, counsel for the Bureau, because of 
a possible lawsuit, said there could be a conflict of interest 
if the original designer were chosen. The new designer would 
prepare working drawings and be paid out of BBC funds. When 
money to repair the roof was appropriated, the BBC would be 
reimbursed. Chairman Spiller asked what priority this appro- 
priation had and was told it was included in the emergency appro- 
priation and had the highest priority. 

The meeting then turned to the last item on the agenda, 
Peninsula Planning Committee . Mr. Brigham said the Committee 
had met recently with representatives from the Legislature, 
the Offices of Senators Brooke and Kennedy, and the Lieutenant 
Governor. The presentation to the meeting focused on two sets 
of alternatives for the future of the Peninsula. The first set 
of alternatives dealt with different levels of public and private 
investment, the second with land use — housing, institutional and 
retail/commercial development. 

The purpose of the presentation, he continued, was not 
to present a set plan, but to outline a further range of possibil- 
ities open to the further development of the Peninsula. This 
was done to encourage discussion of the possibilities and to 
initiate a testing process on financial feasibility and what the 
implementation of the alternatives would involve in terms of 
investment. 



Buildings 
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UM/Boston — 
Energy Con- 
servation 
Appropriation 



UM/Boston — 
Library Roof 



Peninsula 

Planning 

Committee 



G3S6 

Buildings 
and Grounds 
5/4/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At the next meeting, Mr. Brigham continued, it was in- 
tended to present a set of proposals which seemed to be the 
most reasonable and acceptable. Finally, the meeting would deal 
with the strategy for continuing the funding effort. 

Chairman Spiller then called for discussion on a non- 
agends item, Administrative Agreements on Land Transfer to the 
JFK Library. Ms. Robinson said she wanted to alert the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee to the fact that at the next meeting, a 
number of agreements, easements and temporary permits necessary 
to the construction of the JFK Library would be on the agenda 
for Trustee action. 

The meeting then turned to a recent editorial on 
Channel 5 which supported the Governor's impoundment of appro- 
priated funds. After a brief discussion, it was agreed that it 
would be proper for the Committee to offer a rebuttal to the 
editorial and that the individuals most suited to the task were 
Trustees Clark and Shearer. 

The Chairman then thanked Nancy Eddy for her contribu- 
tions to the Committee during her tenure as a Trustee. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee and the meeting adjourned at 10:29 a.m. 



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Dorothy Eft/chel 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

May 4, 1977; 10:30 a.m. 
Room 308 
Administration Building 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff: President Wood; Trustees Dennis. 



Marks, Rowland, Spiller and Troy; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Miller, 
recorder 

Other Trustees: Trustees Baker, Batiste, Crain, Gordon, McNulty 



Romer and Shearer 



Absent Committee Members: Chairman Carlson 



Office of the President: Ms. Hanson, Assistant Vice President 



and Budget Director; Ms. Taylor, Assistant to the Director, 
Budget Office 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Puryear , Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 



and Provost; Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs; Mr. DeNyse, Personnel Office; Mr. Beatty, Director of 
Budgeting and Institutional Studies; Professor Sulzner, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. James, Assistant Chancellor; 
Mr. Baxter, Budget Director; Professor Schwartz, Faculty Re- 
presentative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 
Health Affairs; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor for Administration 
and Finance; Professor Smith, Faculty Representative 

Guest : Mr. Martus, Student, UM/Amherst 

The meeting was called to order at 10:35 a.m. In the 
absence of Chairman Carlson, Trustee Spiller assumed the chair. 
He said the third item on the agenda, Concurrence in the Appoint- 
ment of Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance — UM/Boston 
(Doc. T77-096) had been postponed. He then called for discussion 
on the first item, Fund Transfers — UM/Boston (Doc. T77-095) . 

Mr. Baxter said that it had only recently been possible 
to accurately assess utility costs for FY 1977 because of 
fluctuating surcharge assessments on the monthly electrical bill. 
The fluctuations were due to the kind of fuel used by Boston 
Edison. When oil was used, monthly costs could increase up to 
$60,000. As Boston Edison was now using only nuclear power, and 
as the campus energy conservation program had proved very success 
ful, savings of $430,000 during FY 1977 were anticipated. 

UM/Boston, Mr. Baxter continued, proposed to reallocate 
the money as follows: 



UM/Boston — 
Fund Transfers 
(Doc. T77-095) 



o358 



B&F Comm 
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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

$100,000 to the 01 account for salaries to fill 
critical position vacancies; for example, 20 per- 
cent of the positions in campus security were 
unfilled; 

— $175,000 to the 13 account to purchase library 
books and educational supplies; 

$110,000 to the 12 and 15 accounts for further 
energy conservation measures and equipment, academic 
support equipment and roof repairs; 

— $45,000 to the 16 account for academic computer 
rentals. 

Trustee Dennis asked if there was a fixed cost for 
computer use and if Boston was now paying more of that cost. Mr. 
Baxter answered affirmatively. In response to Trustee Baker's 
question, Mr. Baxter said $7,500 of the $100,000 being trans- 
ferred to the 01 account was for bonus payments and cost-of-livin 
increases, and that the remainder would be used to fill non- 
administrative, non-faculty positions. 

Professor Schwartz asked how much of the money being 
transferred to the equipment account was for academic support 
equipment and was told that the amount was $15,000. Professor 
Schwartz asked why there was no provision in the transfer to the 
01 account for gross equity adjustments, which had not been paid 
for a number of years. Chancellor Golino said that the realloca- 
tion was a "one shot" matter and to use the money to increase 
faculty salaries would raise the problem of finding money for the 
following year, and that equity adjustments had already been made. 



Trustee Batiste asked how computer costs were distributed 
among the several campuses. President Wood said efforts were 
being made to assess costs on the basis of use. For a number of 
reasons, costs were now being assessed partly on the basis of use 
and partly on the basis of rough and ready estimates. The use/ 
cost method of assessment was now at a mid-way stage and when 
fully operational would eliminate the dangerous situation where 
the computer was seen as a free utility. Ms. Hanson said the 
cost of the computer was now being assessed to the campuses more 
realistically, with Boston and Worcester assuming more of the 
burden. 

There was no further discussion, and it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the fund transfers among subsidiary accounts at 
the University of Massachusetts at Boston, as 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

detailed in Trustee Document T77-095. 

The meeting then turned to the next item on the agenda, 
Ratification of Collective Bargaining Agreement — UM/Amherst (Doc. 
T77-098) . Ms. Hanson said the Agreement was, with very minor 
and non-sbustantive variations, the same as the Agreements 
reached with other unions on the Amherst campus. If ratified by 
the Board, the Agreement would be forwarded to the Governor for 
his approval and action. There was no further discussion, and 
it was moved , seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the Agreement between Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts and Local 432, Unit B, The 
International Brotherhood of Police Officers 
(Command Officers) (Doc. T77-098) ; provided, 
however, that no wage increases as specified 
in said Agreement shall become effective until 
the Governor has transferred sufficient funds 
to the University's maintenance accounts to 
meet the cost of the salary increases provided 
by said Agreement. 

Professor Sulzner asked if there was any indication of 
when the Governor would act. To his knowledge, the Governor 
had yet to act on the previous agreements. President Wood said 
he would speak on this matter at the Board meeting. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was adjourned at 10:54 a.m. 



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B&F Comm, 
5/4/77 



UM/Amherst — 
Ratification 
of Collective 
Bargaining 
Agreement 
(Doc. T77-098) 




Dorothy EicfL^l 

Assistant Secretary to the Board 
of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

May 10, 1977; 3:00 p.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Troy; President Wood; 
Trustees Batiste, Breyer, Burack, Crain and Morgenthau; Mr. Colby 
representing Trustee Winthrop; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Miller, 
recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustee Fielding 



Other Trustees: Trustee Baker 



Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cooley, 
Associate Vice President for Analytical Studies 

[JM/Amherst : Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and 



Provost; Mr. Jones, Dean, School of Engineering; Mr. Whaley, Dean, 
School of Food and Natural Resources; Mr. Shapiro, Dean, Faculty 
of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, School of Arts and Sciences; 
Professor Dufau; Professor Killian; Professor McKewen 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. James, Assistant Chancellor; 
r. Hartnagel, Dean of Admissions; Mr. Freeland, Dean, College of 
rofessional Studies; Mr. Safwat, Acting Dean, College of Arts and 

Sciences; Professor Brown, Chairman, Campus Self-Study Committee; 

Professors Broderick, Gagnon, Lutts, Marshall, Schultz, Members, 

Committee on Resources, College of Arts and Sciences; Professor 

Schwartz, Faculty Representative 

Guest: Ms. Pinck, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



Chairman Troy called the meeting to order at 3:20 p.m. 
He noted that the meeting had been called at the request of two 
faculty groups, one from Amherst and one from Boston, to discuss 
the matter of liberal arts at the two campuses with the Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy. The purpose of the meeting was 
to allow the faculties to express their concerns and what they see 
the issues to be. While others present at the meeting were free 
to speak, the essential focus of the meeting was the presentations 
:>y faculty. He then called on Dean Shapiro who said that he hoped 
the meeting would result in a free and open discussion by all con- 
cerned. The purpose of the Amherst contingent at the meeting was 
to talk about the basis of how a plan for reallocating resources 
night best be effected. The need for reallocating resources was 



tr 



UM/Amherst- 
Arts and 
Sciences 



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F&EP Comm. 
5/10/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

recognized by the Deans of the College of Arts and Sciences and 
by most members of the faculty. As student interests and insti- 
tutional needs changed, he continued, the College had in the past 
made necessary reallocations. 

He noted that the numbers of faculty within departments 
was related to student demand and interest . In examining the 
experience of any institution, it could be seen that there were 
regular shifts of resources to accommodate these trends. In mak- 
ing such shifts, the important thing was that they be made on the 
basis of carefully documented studies of what the trends were, 
and that these be made available to all concerned. 

Given the recognized need for reallocation, Mr. Shapiro 
continued, one then had to indicate the actual trends and to pro- 
vide the documentation necessary to prove the assertion. Each 
semester, as Dean of the Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathe- 
matics, he said, he collected and analyzed data on enrollment 
trends within each of the departments of the faculty. In the 
past, reallocations had been made on the basis of these studies. 

The College of Arts and Sciences as a whole, he contin- 
ued, had experienced a steady increase in enrollment each year 
and this was expected to continue. For this reason, he could not 
understand why the first stage of the campus long-range plan in- 
cluded provision for a reduction in the size of the Faculty of 
Natural Sciences and Mathematics over a five-year period. In try- 
ing to comprehend this, he consulted with the Provost and his 
staff and analyzed enrollment and teaching load data for all undefc 
graduate programs at Amherst. The graph and table he had distrib- 
uted at the meeting, he continued, were based on data from the 
Office of Budgeting and Institutional Studies and the Provost's 
Office. They showed that the first stage of the long-range plan 
was not consistent with what the trends were. Professor McEwen 
said that this was certainly true in the science departments. 
Enrollments had increased greatly while faculty and budget had 
decreased. 



In response to Trustee Breyer's question, Mr. Shapiro 
agreed that planning should not be tied only to numbers of stu- 
dents and faculty, however, the compilation of such data was es- 
sential as a base from which one then made modifications based 
upon substantive considerations. 

There then ensued a discussion of a number of matters 
relating to planning and the liberal arts at Amherst including 
the need to include factors such as educational goals and quali- 
ty; the need for agreement on the roles of the various segments 
of the University; the acknowledgement that student/faculty 
ratios necessarily varied from discipline to discipline; the 
involvement of the University in supplying services to the state' 
industries; the broad philosophical basis of the University and 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

rjho should articulate this philosophy; the need to avoid polariza- 
tion of departments, faculties and schools, and the interdependence 
3f same; the locus of the ultimate responsibility for planning; 
the amount of time necessary to plan properly and the need for a 
deadline for completion; the recognition that planning was an on- 
going process subject to change and required a mechanism for re- 
consideration of any aspect of a long-range plan, and the need for 
university-wide definition of some planning terminology. 

Chairman Troy then called on Dean Safwat, who thanked 
the Committee for arranging the meeting to hear the views of the 
faculty. Faculty concern at UM/Boston, he said, was of a differen 
nature. The campus did not have a five-year plan, rather it had 

contingency plan to cope with the possibility that the operating 
Dudget for the coming year of the College of Arts and Sciences 
xrould be 6.5 percent less than the current budget. The impact of 
such a reduced budget was described in the memo distributed at the 
neeting. He then asked Professor Marshall to describe the current 
situation at the College of Liberal Arts. 

Professor Marshall said she wanted to underscore the 
Dean's statement that the situation of the College of Arts and 
Sciences was very different from that of Amherst. The College was 
not reacting to a plan handed down from above, rather it was seek- 
ing and in some measure achieving a kind of stability which would 
provide the time and minimal resources to deal with existing prob- 
lems . 

The Trustees should know, she continued, that no one at 
Boston wanted competition among the Colleges. The need for diver- 
sity and for career-oriented programs at Boston, an urban public 
institution, was recognized and supported by faculty. Further, 
the faculty was fully aware that economic hardships for the Uni- 
versity must be shared by all, and understood that emerging pro- 
grams were in a particularly precarious position since, in some 
instances at least, their survival depends on some growth. 

However, the faculty believed that the College of Arts 
and Sciences was central to the University, and that the College 
las an obligation to itself and to the sister colleges for an 
effective and strong liberal arts program. Faculty was aware that 
this is unusually difficult to provide in an institution which 
quite properly admits many underprepared and disadvantaged studentjs 

On campus, there was a good deal of talk about working- 
class, or low-income students at the College of Arts and Sciences 
with their "career oriented o^ls," and it was known that for the 
most part the "brightest ai. 1 the best" still go to private liberal 
arts colleges and that the liberal arts training they receive ther|e 
contributes substantially to putting them in positions of leader- 
ship. She said she personally felt very strongly that if the Col- 
lege's liberal arts training were of indifferent quality, the 



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UM/ Bos ton- 
Arts and 
Sciences 



F&EP Comm, 
5/10/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

faculty would be irresponsible, because rather than helping the 
mobility of low-income urban students they would be trapped once 
again into mediocre and dead-end jobs from which there were few 
means of escape. This meant the faculty faced a double task — 
meeting the basic needs of a particular kind of student and achiev 
ing a liberal arts program which is genuinely at university level. 
It is more difficult for the UM/Boston College of Arts and Sciences 
than for many other institutions to achieve quality because past 
educational deficiencies of the students had to be remedied and it 
jwas necessary to insure that students weren t shortchanged by 
offering them a liberal arts program too frail to be useful. 



A review of the past few years showed that faculty 
losses had occurred and that part-time instruction had increased 
to a point which was much too high, and resources were stretched 
thin as new programs were undertaken. The College of Arts and 
Sciences has been troubled by changing admissions patterns, not 
always compatible with stated policy. Faculty was worried that 
even with serious budget troubles, attempts would be made to do 
more and more, with less and less, and it would be increasingly 
difficult to achieve and maintain the academic levels that all 
would agree were acceptable. 

What was needed, she said, was a clear plan which will 
last long enough to conduct a serious and proper review of depart- 
ments and programs and implement its results. The College of 
Arts and Sciences departments had conducted many reviews, so many 
that the review process was viewed somewhat cynically by some on 
campus, and to some it seems that the reviews and the resulting 
planning efforts have at times meshed imperfectly. 

Even so, the faculty was anxious to undertake a rigorous 
review of programs, (both departmental and non-departmental offer- 
ings) and the Dean had already set up the review process — the 
first stage to be completed by June 14th. The review should be 
completed sometime during the first semester of next year and can 
then be implemented. However, implementation might well require 
an additional semester and conceivably two. 

The pace may seem slow, she continued, but it should be 
remembered that Dean Safwat was the third chief academic officer 
in as many years, and with the recent merger of two Colleges into 
the College of Arts and Sciences (formerly named the College of 
Liberal Arts) , an educational philosophy had yet to be developed 
which would reflect a coherent program. To date, no core curric- 
ulum had been agreed upon. The newness and rapidly changing 
circumstances in which the College of Arts and Sciences operates 
must be taken into account. Some "merged departments," it should 
be noted, do not yet have a single curriculum, she said. 

The meeting then discussed a number of issues surround- 
ing planning and the College of Arts and Sciences, including the 



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percentage of part-time faculty and the possible deleterious ef- 
fects of same; the difficulties of meeting certain Trustee mandates 
for example, the upper level/lower level student mix ratio of 60/ 
40; the status of the merger; the College's ongoing review of all 
departments and programs; reallocations within the College of Arts 
and Sciences and among the three colleges; the need for a two-year 
period of stability to sort out a number of problems; the willing- 
ness of the College to continue the planning process during the 
two-year period of stability; the sometimes seemingly conflicting 
mandates of the Board, such as calling for academic excellence, as 
well as mandating the need to respond to the goal of having a 
diverse student body; and the need to evaluate non-academic areas 
as well as academic ones in the planning process. 

Chairman Troy thanked the faculty representatives and 
said that the Committee would take due notice of the concerns ex- 
pressed and that these would be reported to the Board at its next 
meeting. 



There was no further business to come before the Commit- 
tee and the meeting adjourned at 5:53 p.m. 



F&EP Comm. 
5/10/77 



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Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

May 18, 1977; 9:00 a.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 
Trustees Gordon, Marks, Rowland and Troy; Secretary Hardy; Ms. 
Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Dennis and Spiller 

Other Trustees : Trustee Burack; Mr. Colby representing Trustee 
Winthrop 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Ms. Hanson, Budget Director and Associate Vice President 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Professor Martin, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor 
for Administration and Finance; Professor Smith, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

Guest : Ms. Shukri, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



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The meeting was called to order at 9:10 a.m. by Chair- 
man Carlson. Chairman Carlson said he would reorder the agenda 
to allow for the most efficient use of the limited time and asked 
first for a Progress Report of the Subcommittee on South African 
Investments . Trustee Marks said the subcommittee had collected 
and studied a substantial amount of material, and had used that 
material to formulate general criteria for assessing the companies 
doing business in South Africa. He said there are, essentially, 
twenty American companies which constitute the bulk of American 
investment in South Africa. Each of these companies had been 
sent a letter asking for specific information with regard to their 
labor, social and investment practices, he said, and replies had 
now been received from eleven of the twenty. Not all the replies 
were satisfactory from the standpoint of the kind of information 
the University was seeking, he said, but the percentage of replies 
was good. A second letter may be sent to the non-respondents. 
As replies are received, he said, the subcommittee is dividing 
the corporations into three groups — those that show evidence of a 
measure of positive movement toward policies and practices consis- 
tent with the sentiments reflected in the Trustee vote in April; 



Progress Report 
of the Subcom- 
mittee on South 
African Invest- 
ments 



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B&F Comm. 
5/18/77 



Executive 
Session 



UM/Boston — 
Concurrence in 
Appointment of 
C . Thomas 
Baxter as Vice 
Chancellor for 
Administration 
and Finance 
(Doc. T77-096) 
UM/Amherst — 
Concurrence in 
Appointment of 
James L. McBee 
as Vice Chan- 
cellor for 
Adminis t rat ion 
and Finance 
(Doc. T77-108) 
UM/Amherst — 
Personnel 
Action 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

those that the subcommittee judges can be influenced; and those 
that are uncooperative and disinterested. When the committee has 
finished compiling the data, said Trustee Marks, it will return 
to the Committee on Budget and Finance with its recommendations 
as to which investments should be held and which ones should be 
divested. Chancellor Bromery added that he had been talking 
recently with Ian McGregor, former Chairman of AMAL, who said 
that no capital investments are being made by his company in South 
Africa at this time and that many of the corporations now operat- 
ing there are signing agreements to ensure equal opportunity. 
President Wood said that he had written a note to Treasurer John- 
son emphasizing the need for early action by the subcommittee in 
view of the student unrest reported at other institutions. 

Chairman Carlson said the Committee would require an 
executive session to discuss two personnel matters on the agenda, 
and at 9:15 a.m. it was moved, seconded, and on roll call unani- 
mously 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss personnel 
matters. 

At 9:40 a.m. it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To end the executive session. 

Chairman Carlson first read the actions taken during 
the executive session, as follows: 



VOTED : 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur, 
along with the President, in the appointment by 
the Chancellor of C. Thomas Baxter, Jr. as Vice 
Chancellor for Administration and Finance at the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston, as detailed 
in Trustee Document T77-096. 



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and 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Executive Committee concur, 
along with the President, in the appointment by 
the Chancellor of James L. McBee, Jr. as Vice 
Chancellor for Administration and Finance at the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst, as detailed 
in Trustee Document T77-108. 



and also 



VOTED : 



To recommend to the Executive Committee approval 
of the personnel action as set forth in Trustee 
Document T77-109. 



Chairman Carlson asked next for discussion and action 



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on the end-of-the-year Fund Transfers — UM/Amherst, UM/Boston and 
UM/Worcester (Docs. T77-104, T77-105 and T77-106 respectively). 
President Wood said that the proposed transfers represented the 
standard annual adjustments of accounts at the end of the fiscal 
year. He added that by means of careful planning he hoped the 
Medical Center would remain solvent until the deficiency budget 
for the Hospital was approved, which he hoped might occur in mid- 
June. There were no questions with regard to the proposed trans- 
fers, and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the fund transfers for the Amherst, Boston and 
Worcester campuses as set forth respectively in 
Trustee Documents T77-104, T77-105 and T77-106. 

Chairman Carlson turned next to the Establishment of 



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B&F Coram. 
5/18/77 

Fund Transfers 
(Docs. T77-104 
T77-105 and 
T77-106) 



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New Trust Funds — UM/Amherst, and asked Ms. Hanson, Budget Director , 
to comment. She recalled that approval of two new trust funds, 
the Institute for Man and Environment Research Services Trust 
Fund (Doc. T77-102) and the Instructional Trust Fund (Doc. T77- 
103) , had been postponed when the Committee last met to consider 
new and increased fees, pending further review by University Coun- 
sel and the Treasurer. This review had now been completed. Trus- 
tee Troy asked if the students were satisfied with the uses to 
which the fees were being put, and Chancellor Bromery said that 
they had not indicated otherwise. 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees establish 
the Institute for Man and Environment Research 
Services Trust Fund/Amherst , which shall have as 
a purpose the support of buildings and vehicles 
used by the National Park Research Unit, as more 
fully described in Doc. T77-102. 

Further, to recommend that the Board adopt for 
FY1978 the IME Research Services Fees and Revenue 
Schedule set forth in Doc. T7 7-102. 

Further, to recommend that the Board authorize 
the transfer of any balances remaining in the 
IME Research Trust Fund Return of Overhead into 
the Institute for Man and Environment Research 
Services Trust Fund/Amherst. 

It was further 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees establish 
the University of Massachusetts/Amherst Instruc- 
tional Trust Fund, which shall have as a purpose 
the providing of laboratory materials and supplies, 



UM/Amherst — 

IME Research 

Services Trust 

Fund 

(Doc. T77-102) 



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UM/ Amherst — 
Instructional 
Trust Fund 
(Doc. T77-103) 



B&F Conrai. 
5/18/77 



Continuing 
Resolution 



UM/Worcester — 
Report on 
Group Practice 
Plan Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and other services and materials incidental or 
ancillary to classes and courses offered by the 
Amherst campus. 

Further, to recommend that this self-supporting 
trust fund support the purchase of said materials 
and supplies, the costs of field trips, the purchase 
of computer time and film rentals, and the funding 
of administrative services related thereto, as 
more fully described in Doc. T77-103, as well as 
other services and materials thereto; provided, 
however, that no other personnel costs nor capital 
equipment shall be supported by said trust fund. 

Further, to recommend that the Chancellor of the 
Amherst campus be delegated the authority to 
establish and modify from time to time at his 
discretion the fees and charges for said services 
and materials, and be authorized to delegate said 
authority in whole or in part to the Provost of 
the Amherst campus. 

Further, to recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that it abolish the several departmental laboratory 
fee trust fund accounts maintained in the Campus 
Center of the Amherst campus and authorize the 
transfer of any balances remaining in said trust 
fund accounts into the University of Massachusetts/ 
Amherst Instructional Trust Fund. 

The last action item on the agenda, said Chairman Carl- 
son, was the matter of a Continuing Resolution , a standard vote 
which is necessary in order for the President to operate the Uni- 
versity from the close of the fiscal year until the adoption of 
the FY 1978 budget. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
President be authorized to approve and adopt 
the policies and procedures governing the expend- 
iture of state and non-state funds by the three 
campuses, the Office of the President and the 
Institute for Governmental Services from July 1, 
1977 until such time as the Board of Trustees 
adopts the Operating Budget for Fiscal Year 1978. 

The approval of expenditure of said funds shall 
be consistent with the applicable state statutes 
governing the FY78 appropriation and in accordance 
with trustee policy. 

Chairman Carlson then turned to the last item of agenda 
the Report on Group Practice Plan Budget — UM/Worcester , which 



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mist be reported to this Committee annually in accordance with 
the Group Practice Rules and Regulations (Doc. T75-144A) . At the 
Chairman's request, Chancellor Bulger commented briefly that the 
Croup Practice was the third of the four parts which make up the 
sources of Medical Center funding: 1) the state investment in 
the Medical School; 2) the state support of the Hospital; 3) the 
Croup Practice; and 4) research income and federal grants and 
contracts. At most medical schools, he said, the faculty salaries 
are about 35 percent funded by a group practice plan. 

Chancellor Bulger said that the rules and regulations 
for the UM/Worcester plan are currently being revised. He then 
rioted that the new rules and regulations are written so that there 
shall never be a deficit in the Group Practice Trust Fund. He 
said if at the end of any year there is not enough money in the 
fund to cover the expenses, the members of the Group Practice will 
share the burden proportionately. He then referred the Committee 
to the FY77 Group Practice Receipts and Expenditures Projection 
tfhich had been distributed earlier, noting the increase in cash 
receipts which have resulted from better billing methods. He 
said that for March and April, receipts had exceeded expenditures 
and that he believed this would now continue. He said that there 
tfould be a deficit on a cash accounting basis, but that there is a 
plan to meet that deficit with internal campus resources and with 
collections from accounts currently in arrears. He also indicated 
that there were some alternative methods for meeting certain ex- 
penses such as the malpractice insurance premium due on July 1. 
Chancellor Bulger said that although the Group Practice Trust 
Fund should pay for the malpractice premiums, if there is a short- 
fall, the physicians will be asked to pay the premiums and will 
De reimbursed at such time as the money becomes available. Ms. 
Hanson said the problem of the Group Practice Trust Fund is one 
of cash flow, but that on an accrual basis, the situation would 
:>e less severe. She also noted that the outstanding receivables 
are substantial and would be increasing the cash flow in FY78. 

There being no further time for discussion, the meeting 
adjourned at 10:10 a.m. 



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Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING 
COMMITTEE ON LONG-RANGE PLANNING 



May 18, 1977; 1:00 p.m. 
Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 
Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 



Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Rowland, President Wood; 



Trustees Baker, Breyer, Carlson, Marks; Secretary Hardy; 
Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustee Clark and Trustee Anrig 



Other Trustees: Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop 



Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cooley, 
Associate Vice President for Analytical Studies; Father Walsh, 
Academic Adviser to the President; Ms. Weiner, Assistant Vice 
President for Academic Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 



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Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Allen, Dean, Faculty of Humanities 
and Fine Arts; Mr. Tillis, Professor of Music; Professor Sulzner, 
Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Martin, Faculty Represent- 
ative. 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Smith, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and 



Provost 

The meeting was called to order at 1:20 p.m. by Chairmar 
Rowland. She said that as a result of the discussion at the in- 
formal session of the full Board, it was her understanding that 
the Long-Range Planning Committee had been directed to establish 
a process by which further development of the planning assumptions 
could occur. Therefore, she said the Committee should first 
consider what this process should be so that it could be presentee 
to the Board in June. She then opened the meeting to discussion. 

President Wood commented that it was first necessary to 
determine a timetable that would enable the process to be in place 
in time to serve as a basis for campus planning over the summer. 

Trustee Marks observed that the informal discussion of 
the Board had been helpful in separating the issue of the final 
long-range plan from the time frame of the budget. Trustee Breyei 
added that he though the development of the planning assumptions 



Master 
Planning 



5374 



L-RP 
5/18/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and the Amherst campus plan had been useful in focussing thinking 
on the planning process and by requiring those involved to take 
the matter seriously. He said he thought a seminar including 
administrators, faculty and others should discuss the following 
four factors in the planning process: 1) procedures for the 
development of final plans, 2) basic assumptions , using either 
the present document (T77-094) or some other document as the basis 
for making assumptions, 3) specifics , what they should be, and 
4) other considerations that arise from the discussions. Trustee 
Carlson remarked that discussions had been ongoing for some time 
without resulting in a clear-cut decision. 

President Wood suggested that it was necessary to obtain 
a vote of the Board which would approve the process and the mandate 
to the Committee, and which would state that the Committee requires 
reactions, judgments and deliberations on certain facets of the 
planning process. Also, he said, it was necessary for all com- 
ponents of the University to meet together and to "walk hand-in- 
hand" through the process. Although the Trustees had heard the 
position of the Arts and Sciences faculties, he said, they had 
not yet heard from the professional schools or from the students. 
He then asked the Chancellors for comment as to how they would 
organize the proposed seminar. 

Chancellor Bromery commented that he would like to 
explain one misconception on his campus. He said that at UM/Amherst 
it was the belief that the campus five-year plan preempted the 
Trustee action on the planning assumptions. This, he said, was 
not so. The campus plan, he said, had been developed in response 
to a Trustee request. Ideally, he said, the assumptions should 
have come before the plan, but the order did not really matter. 
It was important, however, that the faculty on campus understand 
the planning roles as delineated in the University governance 
document (T73-098, as amended). 

Trustee Carlson said he believed before anything went 
forward to the campuses, a position paper should be developed, 
outlining a planning process that has the consensus of the Commit- 
tee and of the Board. Mr. Lynton added that from the vantage 
point of the campuses, it was important to reaffirm that what 
had happened, especially at Amherst, had been part of what the 
campus properly understood the planning process to have been. 

Chancellor Golino informed the Committee that at UM/ 
Boston, in anticipation of an accreditation visit, a committee 
was also engaged in planning activities, and that the ' committee 
wanted some assurance that their planning efforts would receive 
consideration by the Board of Trustees. President Wood said 
he understood this committee would be working over the summer and 
emphasized the importance of providing a timetable to ensure that 
their input would be considered before Board action occurred. It 
was important also, he said, to understand that the five-year plan 
developed at UM/Amherst was not a master plan . A master plan, he 
said, must be University-wide in scope. He reemphasized the 
importance of establishing a timetable as early as possible. 



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Ms. Robinson said that the planning assumptions must be 
essentially in place approximately three months prior to the 
development of the campus plans. She said she hoped the planning 
assumptions would be approved by October. 

Mr. Lynton said that a clear distinction must be made 
between "input" and "planning." The campus committees, he said, 
were in a position to submit valuable "input" into the planning 
process, but the plans themselves were an administrative function. 
In this regard, said Trustee Carlson, it was important to deter- 
mine the relationship between planning and governance. Chancellor 
Bromery commented that there is a perception on the Amherst campus 
that the faculty initiates the planning process. Trustee Carlson 
said that this perception was not correct. Chancellor Bromery 
stated that it was important that the difference between the five- 
year campus plans and the planning assumptions be clarified for 
the personnel on campus. He said it was not universally under- 
stood that it is the Trustees who do the planning. 

President Wood commented that the position paper could 
explain the differences, indicating the three phases of action, 
which he listed as 1) timetable, 2) input, and 3) elaboration. 

Professor Sulzner said he had no difficulty with the 
present governance document as it related to long-range planning. 
He said the faculty simply wanted assurance that they would have 
a chance to submit their reactions to the planning. 

Father Walsh commented that in New York both SUNY and 
CUNY are required to submit a master plan every four years, with 
a progress report every two years, and they cannot deviate from 
the master plan without express permission. 

Chancellor Bromery informed the Committee that at UM/ 
Amherst the establishment of a Council on Planning had been dis- 
cussed, which Council would be charged with ensuring that the 
campus was informed of the planning process and of the evolving 
plans. Provost Smith added that at UM/Worcester a committee 
charged with planning was also at work; they understood, however, 
le said, that their work will be used by the Trustees as a resourc 
and not as a final plan. Mr. Lynton commented on the difficulty 
of developing a plan that everyone would accept, no matter how 
many people may have been involved in the planning process. 

Ms. Robinson said that the problem before the Committee 
was how to get assumptions and guidelines in place as part of 
the planning process that allows Trustees to shape the future of 
the University before campus plans have proceeded too far. Truste 
Marks remarked that there were two kinds of assumptions in the 
planning document: 1) those calling primarily for the judgement 
of the Trustees, and 2) those that required the informed advice 
of the campuses. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Baker asked for clarification of the order in 
which the various processes would occur. President Wood explained 
that, first, the Committee would develop a position paper which 
would say: 1) there are assumptions out for discussion with 
respect to master planning; 2) some assumptions deserve more 
campus attention than others, i.e., some are the responsibility 
of the Trustees and the President's Office and some require the 
guidance and wisdom of the campuses; and 3) the Chancellors and 
Provosts will be responsible for a summer exercise that gathers 
campus input on the basic assumptions. These campus groups will 
be responsible in the fall for reporting to the campus constituen- 
cies what has happened over the summer, including both the activ- 
ities of the Trustees and those of the campus committees. At the 
end of the summer, the Long-Range Planning Committee will receive 
the input from the campuses, which will enable the Committee to 
reaffirm or modify its planning assumptions. Once the final 
assumptions have been approved, the elaboration process will begin. 
Also, when the elaboration process has been completed, the data 
will come back to the Committee on Long-Range Planning, which 
will determine whether the elaboration conforms to the framework 
approved by the Board. Then either the assumptions or the elabor- 
ations will be modified. 

Trustee Marks reiterated that the position paper should 
explain what assumptions require campus attention and which 
assumptions do not really apply to their concerns. President 
Wood replied that the position paper would, indeed, do just that 
Trustee Carlson emphasized the importance of clearly indicating 
that the summer work of the campus committees would be "preparatory' 
work and not a final plan. President Wood said that it would be 
the responsibility of his office to work closely with the campus 
committees to ensure that they understood this and to ensure that 
they would be in a position to defend their work to their con- 
stituencies. Trustee Breyer asked if a time schedule could be 
included in the position paper. President Wood replied affirm- 
atively. Chancellor Golino added that it would also be helpful 
if the paper stated which assumptions were "non-negotiable." He 
said he thought the paper should make clear what the campus options 
were; e.g., whether the campus should continue to plan for a modesi 
growth in graduate programs. 

President Wood stated the importance of separating 
"input" from "elaboration" and suggested the following process: 

1) a draft position paper to be prepared and circulated 
to the Committee on Long-Range Planning prior to the 
June 1 Board meeting, 

2) endorsement of the position paper at the June Board 
meeting, 

3) review and modification as necessary at the September 
Board meeting, after receipt of the input from the 
campuses , 



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4) elaborations by the campuses, to be judged by the 
Trustees, who will then develop the master plan. 

The position paper, he said, would differentiate between primary 
and secondary assumptions; that is, those the campus should be 
primarily concerned with and those that were essentially Trustee 
judgements. It would present the timetable in which the foregoing 
steps would be expected to occur, and it would contain a statement 
which would outline the stages for input, elaboration, review and 
possible modification. 

In reply to a query from Professor Sulzner, President 
Wood concurred that the summer work would be to provide informed 
input and that the elaboration that would take place thereafter 
would constitute the actual campus plan. 

Ms. Robinson said she would prefer that the position 
paper suggest priorities rather than delineate which assumptions 
were Trustee prerogatives and which required campus input. Trustee 
Carlson said he felt there was some merit in dividing the two 
types of assumptions. Father Walsh said he agreed that dividing 
the assumptions into two categories would be helpful to the Trust4es 
as well as to the campuses. Ms. Robinson said it was important 
to separate the questions of fact from the questions of judgement 

Provost Puryear asked for clarification as to the status 
of the first-stage long-range plans for UM/Amherst in the overall 
provess. President Wood replied that the first-stage plans would 
be the basis for the elaboration stage. The framework which woulc 
result from the summer's input, he said, would allow for a more 
rational consideration of the first-stage plan. The input over 
the summer, added Mr. Lynton, would result in a more comprehensive: 
second-stage plan in the early fall. 

Trustee Rowland suggested that the position paper be 
prepared by the Planning Office, submitted on the following 
Wednesday to the Committee on Long-Range Planning, who would 
review it and respond to the Secretary by Friday. Discussion ther. 
ensued as to whether or not the position paper should then be 
mailed to the full Board in light of the limited time. Because o: 
the need for the campuses to work over the summer, it was the con- 
sensus that it should be mailed to the full Board after which 
members of the Long-Range Planning Committee could telephone thos( 
Trustees who had expressed concern over some of the assumptions t( 
discuss their reactions to the position paper. These concerns 
could then be discussed at a later Board meeting, possibly in August 
Trustee Carlson said he thought it was important that Trustee Troy 
Chairman of the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy, be 
advised of the Long-Range Planning Committee's position before thc.t 
committee met on May 25. 



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Analysis of 
Campus Re- 
sponses to 
Report of 
Advisory 
Council on 
the Fine 
Arts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Rowland said that at the June Board meeting she 
would report to the Board members the process established by the 
Committee as a means of implementing the May vote of the Board. 
This concluded the discussion of master planning. 

Chairman Rowland then asked Mr. Lynton to introduce 
I Item 1 of the formal agenda, the Analysis of Campus Responses to 
I Report of Advisory Council of the Fine Arts . The Committee, he 

said, had asked for further elaboration of the original campus 
. responses to the Report of the Fine Arts Council, espeically with 
I reference to the cost of implementation of the principal recom- 
imendations. The campus responses have now been received and cir- 
culated to the Committee, he said, and he would highlight a few 
salient points of each. 

Mr. Lynton said at UM/Amherst the campus had responded 
positively to the recommendation of the Council for more non- 
professional arts programs. He said that strengthening these 
programs would involve, over a five year period, an estimated cos£ 
of $250,000 in one-time renovations and new equipment and another 
$900,000 for salaries. The campus expects, he said, about one 
third of this amount could be met by reallocation of current 
resources. The remainder would have to come from new money — 
either an increase in the operating budget or from outside funding 
He said the campus believes, contrary to the recommendation of th£ 
Council, that it should continue to maintain a balance between thfe 
professional and nonprofessional programs in the arts, rather than 
to give priority to the latter. The campus also believes, he saifl, 
that it should maintain its graduate program in theater, about 
which the Council had raised some questions. In response to the 
Council's suggestion that the activities of the Fine Arts Center 
be expanded to include the community outside the University, the 
campus reported that this is already being done. One possible 
future activity, he said, would be the development of a summer 
arts program on campus — a mini-Tangelwood. 

At UM/Boston, he said, the campus had geared its 
programs to the nonprofessional student, but these programs need 
to be strengthened, as the report of the Council had indicated. 
He said the campus is considering the development of an orchestra 
composed of students and members from the community. The campus 
has also suggested the possibility of using space at 100 Arlington 
Street for the development of a theater company. The campus has 
estimated that to strengthen these programs would require a total 
cost of over $1 million over a five-year period, and it does not 
see the possibility of obtaining substantial funds by reallocation 
of resources. 



Chairman Rowland suggested that it might be helpful to 
hear from the campuses about those recommendations of the Council 
with which they disagree. Mr. Tillis said the areas of disagree- 
ment at UM/Amherst were in the emphasis of the theater program 
and in the need for balance between professional and nonprofes- 
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is necessary in order to provide teaching assistance for the non- 
professional programs. Scholarship students in the professional 
programs can provide this assistance, he said. He added that the 
activities in theater had been limited because the department was 
understaffed. Dean Allen commented that an excellent teaching 
faculty attracts strong graduate students, who in turn can provide 
high-quality teaching assistance for nonprofessional programs. He 
said it is difficult to have a good theater program that is not a 
professional program. He also remarked that, unlike the Boston 
area, there is not a wide range of cultural activities in the area 
and therefore the University programs fill a void. The programs 
in music, dance and art, he said, are well staffed and of excellenjt 
quality, but the theater program has a faculty of only nine. 

Chairman Rowland reminded the Committee of the Trustees' 
commitment to the arts and to broad undergraduate participation 
in this area, as evidenced by the policy statement approved by the 
Board in October 1976 (Doc. T77-032) . 

Trustee Marks said it seemed to him the Committee must 
deal with four separate issues, each one a matter of balancing one 
area against another: 

1) Performing versus visual arts 

2) Majors versus general program 

3) UM/Amherst programs versus UM/Boston programs 

4) Arts extension at UM/Amherst versus very limited 
programs at UM/Boston 



Chancellor Golino said that in order to make use of the 
community resources in the Boston area, it is necessary to have a 
basic program on campus. Even if money became available, he said, 
there is no space in which to operate adequate arts programs. 
Provost Steamer said he felt that it was possible that some positijons 
could be reallocated to the arts. Mr. Lynton suggested that a top 
priority of the campus might be the appointment of an arts co- 
ordinator to develop programs both on campus and in the community. 

The hour being late, it was the consensus that discussiojn 
should be continued at the June meeting, at which time the Chair- 
man of the Advisory Council would be invited to join the Committee 

Chairman Rowland said that the Report of the Multi- 
campus Subcommittee on Continuing Education on the agenda for this 
meeting would be postponed until the Committee met in June. The 
meeting then adjourned at 3:25 p.m. 



L-RP 
5/18/77 




Dorothy E/Ahel 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS 

May 18, 1977; 1:00 p.m. 

Twelfth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Robertson; Trustee 



O*. 



McNulty; Ms. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding; Mr. Miller, 
recorder 

Committee Members Absent: Trustees Gordon, McNeil, Okin and 



Shearer 

Office of the President: Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for 



University Policy 

j UM/ Amherst : Professor Friedman, Associate Faculty Representative 



UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor 



for Administration and Finance; Professor Smith, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

The meeting was called to order at 1:20 p.m. Chairman 
Robertson called on Chancellor Bulger for the Chancellor's Agenda- 
UM/Worcester , who said that the Medical School was now prepared to 



recommend to the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy the 
establishment of a Department of Neurology. This recommendation, 
if approved by the Faculty and Educational Policy Committee and 
the Board, would eliminate a major deficiency in the School's 
clinical offerings. 

The meeting then turned to the next item on the agenda, 
Group Practice — Rules and Regulations . Mr. Eller said that the 



UM/Worcester— 
Chancellor' s 
Agenda 



present rules and regulations of the Group Practice, which had 
been approved by the Board on June 25, 1975, had included the pro- 
viso that they would be reviewed by the Board in June, 1977. To 
this end, staff at the Medical Center and the President's Office 
had been engaged in a year- long analysis of operations and struc- 
ture of the Group Practice as well as the rules and regulations. 

The draft new rules and regulations at hand, Mr. Eller 
continued, represented the essential results and conclusions of 
this joint analysis, however, minor modifications were still need- 
ed. These were being made and a completed draft would be in the 
hands of the Committee within one week. 

Chancellor Bulger said the major differences in the pro- 
posed regulations from those currently in force included a shift 
from the individual clinician for budgeting and reporting purposes 
to the chairmen of the clinical departments, thus ensuring ef fee- 



Group Practice- 
Rules and 
Regulations 



Health Affairs 
5/18/77 



UM/ Wore ester- 
Merger of 
Departments 
of Family 
Practice and 
Community 
Medicine 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

tive departmental budget planning; requirements that debts be re- 
paid and that all members would bear proportional responsibility 
for shortfalls in income; lastly, creation of departmental educa- 
tional funds, a reserve fund for low-earning departments and a 
Chancellor/Dean's discretionary fund. There then ensued a discus- 
sion of the Group Practice Plan, including the Plan's similarities 
and differences from other such plans, the pros and cons of the 
proposed clinical department approach as opposed to present indi- 
vidual clinician approach; the fact that the reserve funds would 
not grow to disproportionate size, and the mechanics of projecting 
the income of the Plan and of allocating funds. 

Because the Trustees present had other commitments, it 
was agreed to postpone discussion of the last item on the agenda, 
^ Merger of Departments of Family Practice and Community Medicine , 
until the next meeting. 

There being no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, the meeting adjourned at 2:38 p.m. 



^/TladysJ Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

May 24, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Shearer; President Wood; 



Trustees Baker, Batiste, McNeil, Romer; Secretary Hardy; Ms. 
Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustees Anrig, Crain, Morgenthau and 



Okin 

Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for University Policy 
UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chan- 



cellor for Student Affairs; Mr. Hite, Co-President, Student Gov- 
ernment Association 

UM/Boston : Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Mr. 



a 



Hartnagel, Dean of Admissions; Ms. Dubose, Assistant Director of 
Financial Aid; Mr. James, Assistant Chancellor; Ms. Van Ummersen, 
Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; Professor Schwart2 
Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Smith, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and 



Provost; Mr. Feinblatt, Associate Dean and Director of Student 
Affairs; Ms. Gagliardi, Assistant Dean of Admissions; Ms. Jeff- 
coat, Assistant to Provost Smith 

Guests: Ms. Pinck, Executive Office of Educational Affairs; Mr. 



Richarson, Associate Alumni, UM/Amherst 

The meeting was called to order at 10:10 a.m. by Chair- 
man Shearer. At the request of the Chairman, President Wood spokei 
briefly on the status of the FY 1978 budget request. 

Chairman Shearer then asked President Wood to introduce | 
the first item of agenda, Intercollegiate Athletic Tuition Waiv- 
ers — UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-101) . President Wood explained that 
the proposed waiver for athletes is to be a part of a new catego- 
ry which the administration will present to the Trustees next 
month designed to give recognition to those students who partici- 
pated in activities or performed services which contributed sig- 
nificantly to the undergraduate mission of the University. He 
asked Mr. Eller to elaborate further. 

Mr. Eller reviewed briefly the Board's commitment to 
the development of intercollegiate athletic programs as evidenced 



UM/Amherst — 
Intercolle- 
giate Athletic 
Tuition Waivers 
(Doc. T77-101) 



538-1 



Student Affairs 
5/24/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

by a vote taken in 1960, which supported the need for teams that 
would be competitive with other colleges and universities. Suc- 
cessful athletic programs, he said, encourage greater support 
from alumni, which in turn, provides assistance to other univer- 
sity programs. The Associate Alumni, he said, had indicated that 
if the University would provide tuition waivers to athletes, they 
would in turn contribute more aid to the athletic programs. Cur- 
rently, no state funds are provided for athletics. Scholarships 
are funded entirely from money generated within the athletic 
enterprise. The proposed waivers, he said, would be a short-term 
solution to the rebuilding of the programs to the point where the} 
are competitive and would ensure that scholarship support for 
other programs would not be diminished. 

Mr. Richarson of the Associate Alumni supported Mr. 
Eller's remarks, adding that a recent telethon conducted by the 
Alumni office had indicated that successful athletic programs in- 
creased the visibility of the University, which in turn increased 
alumni support. Mr. Eller added that in the last few years Alumni 
support had increased from $50,000 to $300,000, and that a consid- 
erable amount of the money received was used for scholarships in 
various programs. 

Chancellor Bromery noted that successful athletic pro- 
grams contributed revenue through ticket sales, and that this 
revenue was required in order to pay off debt service on the sta- 
dium. Also, he said, under Title 9 funds must be reallocated to 
strengthen women's sports, thus limited funds are spread thinner. 

Lengthy discussion ensued with regard to the use of 
waivers as a means of financial aid, and the fact that some felt 
such aid should be based on need, while others believed that the 
proposed new category of assisting deserving students could ben- 
efit programs such as attracting talented students to the fine 
arts. It was noted that financial aid funds have increased from 
$2 million to $9 million at the University over the past five 
years and students in financial need are taken care of. The 
$60,000 represented by the proposed waivers, it was emphasized, 
represented a small percentage of the $12 million in tuition re- 
ceipts annually returned by the University to the Commonwealth. 

Chairman Shearer noted that Trustee Crain, who was un- 
able to attend the meeting, had raised some questions which she 
felt had been covered in the discussion. With the understanding 
that the athletic waivers would be provided for a one-year period 
(representing a four-year commitment to the athletes involved) 
and with the further understanding that the entire tuition waiver 
policy would be reviewed in August, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Committee on Budget and 
Finance that the Chancellor of UM/ Amherst be 
authorized to grant 120 undergraduate athletic 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

tuition waivers to Massachusetts residents 
as outlined in Doc. T77-101. 

Trustee Batiste voted in opposition to the motion. 

At the request of Chairman Shearer, Mr. Lynton intro- 
duced the next agenda item, Admissions Reports . He said since 
these were the first in a series of semi-annual reports, they 
were voluminous, and included information about the operation of 
the admissions offices as well as detailed admissions statistics 

Mr. Woodbury spoke first with regard to UM/Amherst. 
Although applications were down, he said, the yield was up. In 
other words, more of those who applied were actually paying their 
deposit, an indication that they were seriously intending to at- 
tend. It was observed that the recently imposed application fee 
could have resulted in fewer students applying to the University 
as an alternative to a first choice. The freshman class for next 
year at UM/Amherst, he said, had actually increased by 200 stu- 
dents. The campus had also dropped its 54-credit-hour require- 
ment for transfer students, he said, making it possible to trans- 
fer before the junior year. The number of transfer students was 
also larger than last year. Requests for financial aid, he noted 
were down, an indication that more students from middle income 
families were applying. Ways were discussed in which the Univer- 
sity could encourage needy students to apply; for example, provid 
ing help in filling out financial-aid forms. Also discussed was 
the concern over the attrition rate and the causes for it. Being 
discussed, said Mr. Woodbury, were ways of tracking students aftej: 
they left the University over a long-term period for the purpose 
of assessing the success of the University in meeting its goal 
of providing a worthwhile educational experience to its students. 

Mr. Woodbury concluded his remarks by mentioning a 
recent two-day program held on campus attended by 175 Boston area 
high school students, the purpose of which was to acquaint them 
with the campus and its offerings. It had been a very successful 
endeavor, he said, to which Trustee Batiste enthusiastically a- 
greed. 

Vice Chancellor Tubbs reported for UM/Boston. He said 
the campus had grown from 6000 to 8000 students in three and one- 
half years, with a largely nontraditional student body, older 
than the typical college student. He said at UM/Boston as at UM/ 
Amherst more of the applicants were actually enrolling than in 
previous years. He then asked Dean Hartnagel to report on plans 
for recruiting students. Mr. Hartnagel said that since so many 
of the UM/Boston students are working people or women with fami- 
lies, it is necessary to take the services to the students, be- 
cause they lack the time to come to the campus. Plans are under- 
way to provide training to volunteers in the community to assist 
applicants in completing financial-aid forms. Also, since many 



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Student Affairs 
5/24/77 



UM/Amherst- 

Admissions 

Report 



UM/Boston— 

Admissions 

Report 



5 



Student Affairs 
5/24/77 



UM/Worcester— 

Admissions 

Report 



UM/ Worcester- 
Financial Aid 



UM/Boston — 
Financial Aid 



UM/ Amherst — 
Financial Aid 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

older women are interested in returning to school, the possibility 
of providing information at shopping centers will be explored. 
He said an outreach program in being developed to recruit students 
who may be intimidated by having to come to the campus in order to 
apply. Professor Schwartz noted that little progress was being 
made toward attaining the mix desired by the Trustees and that 
65 percent of the student body are in the lower division. 

President Wood, reminding the Committee about the Uni- 
versity's participation in the transfer compact, said that the 
UM/Amherst transfer program has been more successful than that at 
UM/Boston. He added that transfer students at UM/Amherst have 
been found to perform better academically than those admitted as 
Freshmen. He said that both campuses needed to address the prob- 
lem of attrition and its relationships to the capacity of the 
admissions process to determine motivation; appropriateness of 
immediate entry into college from high school; or delayed admissioTJi, 
which should be viewed as acceptable and honorable. 



Chairman Shearer asked next for a report from UM/ 
Worcester. Ms. Gagliardi, Associate Dean for Admissions, report- 
ed that 1015 applications had been received, and the fall class 
had been filled with 34 women and 66 men, about 20 percent of 
whom came from underserved areas of the state. The school now 
has ten black students. The entering class is somewhat older 
than the typical first-year medical student. Some have had expe- 
rience in areas related to medicine or social service. The Medi- 
cal School, she reported, has several outreach programs; the 
major program involves working with the six state Health Service 
Associations toward identifying potential medical students in 
underserved areas, both rural and urban. The pool of minority 
students, it was noted, was small since only residents are admit- 
ted, and there is keen competition from other schools. 

With regard to financial aid, Provost Smith reported 
that they have been able to meet the needs of the students. How- 
ever, with the increasing complexity of kinds and sources of fi- 
nancial aid, it has become necessary to establish a financial aid 
office at the Medical School. Dean Feinblatt noted that medical 
students often are already heavily in debt for their education 
before they get to medical school. Ms. Pinck commented that a 
bill is before the Legislature which would increase tuition, but 
would then allow waivers up to 75 percent for medical students. 

Vice Chancellor Tubbs reported that approximately 40 
percent of the students at UM/Boston received some kind of finan- 
cial aid. Aid had increased by 150 percent over the past three 
years. 

Mr. Woodbury said that the financial aid office at UM/ 
Amherst had been reorganized to make it more effective. The pat- 
tern of aid, however, was similar to that on the other campuses. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The campus had prepared a student resource survey, he said, and 
copies were available for circulation to the Committee. 

Chairman Shearer then asked for a report on the on- 
going topic of Student Support Services at UM/Boston . Mr. Lynton 
introduced the discussion, indicating that the emphasis for this 
meeting would be on the relation of the support services to the 
retention of students. There are four kinds of support services 
required — academic, personal, financial, and identification with 
the campus. It had been found that more students drop out for 
financial and personal reasons than from failing to meet academic 
requirements. The need for identification with the campus is met 
to some extent through participation in the various campus activ- 
ities, such as the social centers. Ms. Van Ummersen said that in 
the past support services had been organized differently in the 
different colleges. Some courses had adjunct tutorial sections. 
In others, the tutorial service was a separate function, either 
provided to small groups or on a one-to-one basis. In the Colleg£ 
of Public and Community Service every student is given a seven- 
week program designed to assess the student's academic skills, in 
order to provide a program which will enable that student to ac- 
quire the necessary exit-level skills. Child care is an important 
service on the Boston campus, where a student sometimes is forced 
to miss class for lack of a babysitter. 

Chairman Shearer asked Trustee Baker to enlighten the 
Committee as to the campus concern evidenced in a recent Mass 
Media article. Trustee Baker explained that a proposal to cen- 
tralize some of the support services had raised some fear on cam- 
pus that yet another layer of administration was about to be im- 
posed between the students and the support services. She said 
she would present material on this subject at the next meeting of 
the Committee. Mr. James said that the ad hoc committee recom- 
mendations had provided for additional administrative staff, but 
that these recommendations had been modified in the Chancellor's 
implementation memorandum. The Assembly had passed a resolution 
to be transmitted to the Trustees indicating that the Chancellor 
had not cooperated with the Assembly. Since that time the Assem- 
bly had added to the resolution the fact that the Chancellor was 
now working with the Assembly. This resolution will now be for- 
warded to the Committee with memoranda indicating that the Chan- 
cellor is now working with the Steering Committee of the Assem- 
bly. 

Mr. Tubbs said that the time for a decision on whether 
the student support services should be centralized or decentralized 
was overdue and it was time to come to grips with the problem. 
President Wood said that this was essentially a campus matter, 
and though the "process" was important, it was necessary to give 
"substance" to the programs. 

Chairman Shearer said that since time had run out, 



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5/24/77 



UM/ Bos ton- 
Student Support 
Services 



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5/24/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Placement Services would be the first item of agenda at the next 



meeting, to be followed by a completion of the report on student 
services . 

The meeting adjourned at 12:10 p.m. 






UJladys g K( 




ladys Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

May 24, 1977; 1:30 p.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : President Wood; Trustees Burack, 
Dennis, McNulty and Romer; Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrob; 
Secretary Hardy; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Committee Members Absent : Chairman Spiller; Trustee Clark 

Other Trustees : Trustees Baker and Shearer 

Office of the President : Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Plan- 
ning; Mr. Brigham, Senior University Planner 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student Af- 
fairs; Mr. Beatty, Director, Institutional Studies; Mr. Little- 
field, Director of Planning; Mr. Hite, Co-President, Student Gov- 
ernment Association 

UM/ Bo st on : Mr. Prince, Director of Planning and Development 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Twohig, Construction and Maintenance Engineer 



The meeting was called to order at 1:38 p.m. In the 
absence of Chairman Spiller, Trustee Dennis took the chair. He 
said President Wood wished to inform the Committee of the status 
of the FY 1978 budget request. President Wood said the House Ways 
and Means Committee had recommended an FY78 budget of $121,127,58$ 
for the University, an increase of $13,052,560, or 12 percent ove 
the FY77 budget of $108,075,025. If the Governor's recommendation 
for FY78 had been accepted, he continued, the University would 
have lost 5 percent by having to absorb cost-of-living increases 
of some $5,400,000. 

A breakdown of the recommended budget, President Wood 
continued, showed an increase of $3,823,908 for the Amherst cam- 
pus, from $68,088,789 to $71,912,697; Boston up $1,433,286, from 
$18,090,749 to $19,524,035; at Worcester, the Teaching Hospital 
went from $9,500,000 to $16,800,000, an increase of $7,300,000, 
and the Medical School from $9,045,000 to $9,621,500, an increase 
of $576,500. Increases in other areas included $10,000 for the 
Institute for Governmental Services, from $111,859 to $121,859 and 
the General Court Scholarships which went from nil to $7,000. 
Several items remained constant — Assistance to Higher Education, 
$200,000; Assistance for the Disadvantaged, $700,000; and Student 
Aid, $1,250,000. As was typical at this stage of the budget proc 
ess, President Wood continued, the only cut recommended was in th^ 



Report on 
Status of 
FY78 Budget 
Request 



B&G Comm. 
5/24/77 



UM/Amherst — 
Anti-pollution 
renovation — 
Coal-fired 
Boiler Plant 



Design and 
construction 
responsibil- 
ities — the 
University 
and BBC 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

budget of the President's Of f ice— $990,494 from $1,068,628, a de- 
crease of $78,134. The budget would now go to the Senate, but the 
floor figure of $121,127,585 had been established, and any further 
changes would be increases. 

Chairman Dennis then called for discussion on the first 
item on the agenda, Anti-pollution renovation — Coal-fired Boiler 
Plant . Ms. Robinson said that Mr. Littlefield and she had met 
with representatives of the Attorney General, the Bureau of Build-' 
ing Construction and the Executive Office of Administration and 
Finance. At the meeting, the BBC and the Administration and Fi- 
nance representatives strongly supported renovation of the coal- 
fired plant. The reason for this seeming shift away from the 
Tillson plant was that further tests showed that the defects in 
the tie line system of the new plant were more widespread than had 
been thought. All repair work on the system had been stopped. 

If the Board agreed, she continued, work on upgrading 
the coal-fired plant would begin immediately. The Designer Selec- 
tion Board had agreed to name a designer at its next meeting in 
June. There were time constraints affecting the completion of the 
job — the work had to be done in the summer months and it could 
take up to a year to construct the pollution control equipment-- 
however, it was hoped this could be done by fall 1979. 

In the ensuing discussion, it was agreed that the issue 
of responsibility should not be dropped and that the commitment of 
the BBC to pursue this matter should not be part of the Memorandum 
of Agreement of the May 5, 1977 meeting but should be stated in a 
separate letter. Also discussed was the need to make the public 
aware of all the facts surrounding controversial issues, and the 
sometimes slanted way such facts were presented in the media. 

There was no further discussion and it was moved and 
seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 

development of a program and design for renovations 
of the coal-fired boiler plant at UM/Amherst to 
meet fly ash emission standards. 

In the discussion of the second item on the agenda, 
Design and construction responsibilities: the University and BBC 



I 



it was noted that while the BBC created many difficulties for the 
University, the Bureau had administered the construction of physi- 
cal facilities at Amherst costing well over $100 million and thatj, 
at times, it had to operate under bureaucratic constraints which 
were self-defeating. These included a policy wherein contractors 
were paid up to 99 percent of the total cost of a building prior 
to its completion and acceptance. This led to instances where the 
contractor's reluctance to properly complete a building could only 
be overcome by going to court. The BBC's practice of hiring arch;L 



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tects and engineers and then hiring contractors cast the architects 
and engineers in the role of observers rather than supervisors. 
Similarly, the University's role in the construction process was 
that of an observer rather than a proprietor. In the matter of 
awarding contracts, the BBC was legally bound to select the "lowest 
responsible and eligible bidder." At times, the Bureau seemed 
to interpret this to mean the lowest bidder. 

In discussing the University s options in overcoming the 
difficulties caused by the BBC, it was stated that it would be 
possible to chronicle the Bureau's shortcomings and to publicize 
them. This would place the responsibility for disasters such as 
the Tillson plant and the seawater plant at Boston where it belong- 
ed but would accomplish little else. The Board could press for a 
separate building authority for higher education. This would prob- 
ably be supported by all segments of public higher education but 
would almost certainly be seen as yet further empire building by 
the public. Finally, the University could identify the limitations 
of the present process and attempt to improve the system in con- 
junction with the BBC. Because there were so many things still ijh. 
the construction "pipe line," it would be impolitic of the Univerf 
sity to be seen by the BBC as an antagonist. For this reason, thl 
last alternative was to be preferred. 

As the discussion concluded, Chairman Dennis suggested 
that recommendations, including, if necessary, legislative 
remedies, be developed and presented to the Committee. President 
Wood said this would be done. 

The meeting then turned to the next item on the agenda,; UM/Amherst — 

Handicapped access — Brett House dormitory . The Committee was tol|i Handicapped 

it was being asked to consider two actions. Firstly, to authorize access — Brett 

the renovation of Brett House to bring it in compliance with stand- House dormi- 

ards established by the state Architectural Barriers Board. Sec- tory 

ondly, to request the Building Authority to make available certain (Doc. T77-119) 
fund balances for the renovation. 



In the discussion which followed, it was apparent that 
the Trustees were agreeable to the proposed renovations but were 
deeply concerned with the long term financial implications of 
meeting all of the standards set by the Architectural Barriers 
Board and of possible future standards to be set by the Department 
of Health, Education and Welfare. 



There was no further discussion and it was moved, second- 



ed and 



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VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 

and request the concurrence of the Building Authority 
in the renovation of Brett House dormitory to provide 
full access for handicapped residents, in accordance" 
with plans and specifications developed and approved 



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JFK Library 
administrative 
agreements 
(Doc. T77-118) 



Update: 
Planning for 
Columbia Point 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



by the University of Massachusetts/Amherst ; and, 
to request that the Building Authority make avail- 
able funds from construction balances or other 
Building Authority accounts to cover the cost of 
renovations to Brett House dormitory to provide 
full access for handicapped residents, as set forth 
in Doc. T77-119. 

Implicit in the vote was the understanding that the Committee and 
the Board would be apprised of the implications of bringing the 
residential system into compliance with any and all regulations 
dealing with accessibility for the handicapped before further 
renovation proposals would be considered. 

The meeting then turned to the fourth item on the agend 
JFK Library administrative agreements . The Committee was told 
that the construction and operation of the JFK Library would en- 
tail a series of agreements between the University and the Librar 
Corporation and the granting of certain easements to the Corpora- 
tion by the University. The agreements or easements being proposed 
were normal and expected in such a transaction. 

After a brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board that the President be 
authorized to enter into memoranda of agreement 
with the John F. Kennedy Library Corporation and 
the General Services Administration concerning 
the construction and operation of the John F. 
Kennedy Presidential Library, and further to 
authorize the President to grant certain road, 
parking, drain and utility easements required 
for the construction and operation of the Library, 
as outlined on the attached map, said agreement 
and easements to be subject to approval by the 
General Counsel of the University, as set forth 
in Doc. T77-118. 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item Update : 
Planning for Columbia Point . The Committee was told that efforts 
were underway to stabilize the old housing stock in Dorchester 
and the University would shortly send representatives to Washing- 
ton to meet with the Massachusetts Congressional delegation to 
discuss the possibility of aid from HUD's New Town in Town Prograin. 
Further possibilities of development options available to the Penin- 
sula Planning Committee, that is, institutional growth or residen- 
tial growth, or industrial/retail growth, were still under discus- 
sion. Also, modernization of a limited number of the housing uni 
at Columbia Point was scheduled to start in June. Finally, the 
municipal government was in the process of compiling a priority 
list of areas to be funded for development over the next several 
years. Columbia Point and a part of Dorchester were understood tb 



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be on the list. 



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In discussing the involvement of the Communities, sev- 
eral points were made. While Dorchester could be seen as over- 
organized, Columbia Point was still in the process of becoming a 
genuine community; however, it was now at the stage that the 
residents were thinking in terms of indigenous management of the 
housing complex rather than being administered by the Boston Hous^- 
ing Authority. The question of whether the University was thwart- 
ing the development of leadership in the community was discussed, | 
as was the possibility that the lack of leadership could be trace 
to the lack of services at the Point, leading to an outmigration 
of potential leaders. Finally, in order to ensure that the devel- 
opment of the Point did not fall into the hands of speculators, 
a limited dividend development corporation was needed, as well as 
a policy of leasing property rather than selling it. 

In the matter of Update: Litigation on Gymnasium , the 
Committee was told that the matter was now in the period of dis- 
closure with Counsel for both sides taking depositions from in- 
volved parties, and the issue seemed to be near resolution. 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item Update: UM/ 
Amherst — Student housing study . The Trustees were told that at 
the Board's behest Amherst had undertaken a study of the dormito- 
ries. The study was being made in three stages: Firstly, a study 
of the management of the dormitories; this stage had been com- 
pleted. Secondly, an assessment of the physical condition of the 
dorms; this stage was being done by an outside consulting firm 
and was expected to be completed in October. Thirdly, a study of | 
the cost of renovating the dorms. 

In the discussion that ensued, Chairman Dennis was as- 
sured that the Trustees would not be faced with a request to rais< 
residence hall fees for the coming year. Also discussed was the 
fact that many of the dormitories were ten or twelve years old anc 
needed extensive renovations. Because they had yet to be amortized, 
the renovations presumably would be the responsibility of the Uni4 
versity, working with the Building Authority. Additionally, the 
renovation reserve funds had depleted by inflation and were almost 
certainly inadequate. 

In the matter of Update: UM/Worcester — Equipment list , 
the meeting was told that the list had been submitted to Secretari 
Parks and he had asked a number of questions. The campus was 
preparing a response to this request. 



Update: 
UM/ Bos ton- 
Litigation on 
Gymnasium 

Update: 
UM/Amherst — 
Student hous- 
ing study 



Update: 

UM/ Worcester — 

Equipment list 



The meeting then turned to the final item on the agenda, 
Update: UM/Amherst — Capital grant and land use agreement for bus 



system . The Committee was told that the Board, at its October 5, 



1975 meeting, had authorized the construction of a bus storage and 
maintenance facility subject to receipt of a capital grant from 



Update: 
UM/Amherst — 
Capital grant 
and land use 
agreement for 
bus system 



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1394 



B&G Comm. 
5/24/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the U.S. Department of Transportation. The necessary grant had 
been received and construction was slated to begin shortly. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit- 
tee and the meeting was adjourned at 4:15 p.m. 



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Assistant /Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

May 25, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 
Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

ATTENDANCE: [ Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Troy; President Wood; 

Trustees Batiste, Breyer, Burack and Morgenthau; Mr. Colby repre- 
senting Trustee Winthrop; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Committee Members Absent : Trustees Crain and Fielding 

Other Trustees : Trustee Baker 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Father Walsh, Academic Advisor to the President; Ms. 
Weiner, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Allen, Dean, Humanities and Fin& 
Arts; Mr. Chapell, Dean, Graduate School; Professor Sulzner, Fac- 
ulty Representative; Professor Brogan, Faculty Representative- 
Designate 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Professors Fingeret and Rosenmeier, 
College of Public and Community Services; Professor Martin, Fac- 
ulty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for 



Academic Affairs and Provost 



Guest: Ms. Pinck, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



I 



The meeting was called to order at 10:03 a.m. Chairman 
Troy called for discussion on the first item of the agenda, Basic 
Skillsj College of Public and Community Services . Ms. Fingeret 
described the many facets of basic skills instruction at the CPCS 
including the various tests administered to incoming students whi4h 
identified the level of remedial help needed by the students in 
developing basic skills; the several avenues of help open to 
students including individual tutoring; the consistent effort to 
relate competency in basic skills to subject content of all aca- 
demic courses; and the fact that while students became aware of 
their needs through the testing process, their perception of the 
commitment needed to remedy the problems was, at times, unrealis- 
tic. In the discussion which followed Ms. Fingeret' s remarks, 
several points were raised; for example, the ongoing development 
of college-wide standards of basic skills; the fact that test 



UM/Boston — 
Basic Skills 
College of 
Public and 
Community 
Services 



LscKw 



F&EP Comm. 
5/25/77 



Trustee 
Discussion 
of May 10 
Meeting with 
Arts and 
Science 
Faculties 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

results could lead to a recommendation that a student take remedi- 
al help, rather than the requirement that this be done; and the 
range of options of help provided and, given this range of option^ 
the near impossibility of compiling precise statistics. The Com- 
mittee agreed that further needs in basic skills instruction, in 
terms of programs and resources at Amherst and Boston, should be 
determined. 

President Wood then gave a brief outline of the status 
of the FY78 budget request. The $121,127,585, an increase of 
$13,052,560 over FY77, recommended by the House Ways and Means 
Committee, in the President's words, put the University in a posi- 
tion between survival and excellence. The $71,912,697 recommended 
for Amherst absorbed the cost-of-living increases but did not re- 
spond to the specific needs of renewal and renovation. The 
$16,800,000 placed the Teaching Hospital in a livable position; 
the $9,621,500 recommended for the Medical School, an increase of 
$576,500 would enable the School to fund 15 of the 35 needed new 
positions. The increase of $1,433,286, making Boston's FY78 
budget $19,524,035, would compel the campus to rethink the dooms- 
day position it had assumed. 

In the course of his remarks, President Wood noted that 
a report from the Dean of Admissions to the Student Affairs Com- 
mittee had shown that enrollment at the Boston campus was decreas- 
ing. This was partly due to the campus's reduced recruiting ef- 
fort in expectation of level funding. This led to a general dis- 
cussion of admissions at Boston and it was agreed that the Facultt 
and Educational Policy Committee should deal with this matter mor^ 
fully at its next meeting. 

The meeting then turned to the item on the agenda Trus- 
tee Discussion of May 10 Meeting with Arts and Sciences Faculties 



There was general agreement that the group from Boston had made a 
most effective presentation of their concerns and their efforts, 
but the anticipated legislative action just reported would in fac 
obviate the detrimental effects on liberal arts based upon a leve 
funded or reduced budget which had been assumed by the campus ad- 
ministration in its development of the contingency budget. Had 
there been a reduced budget, the College of Arts and Sciences 
would have had to bear a proportional share of any reductions. 

In discussing the Amherst contingent's presentation, 
the Trustees expressed admiration for a job well done. Further 
discussion centered on several points raised at the May 10 meet- 
ing. These included the question of whether the data used by the 
Provost was the same as that supplied to the faculty, or whether 
the data was essentially the same and the seeming differences 
were in fact differing interpretations of the data; and the ques- 
tion of a possible lack of consistency in applying criteria for 
resource reallocation. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item on the Merger; 
of Departments of Community and Family Medicine and of Family Prac- 



tice — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-107). The meeting was told that this 
proposal was to rejoin two departments which had separated some 
four years ago. The separation had led to confusion among students 
and faculty and had been uneconomical and counterproductive. The 
two departments involved, as well as the Executive Council of the 
Medical Center, were unanimously in favor of the merger. There 
was no further discussion and it was moved, seconded and 



VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the merger of the Departments of Community and 
Family Medicine and of Family Practice into the 
Department of Family and Community Medicine at 
the University of Massachusetts at Worcester as 
set forth in Doc. T77-107. 

The meeting then turned to the Establishment of a Depart 
ment of Neurology — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-112) . The meeting was 



told that the lack of a Department of Neurology was a major defi- 
ciency at the Medical School and had been recognized as such since. 
1975. A search for the Chairman of the Department had been suc- 
cessfully concluded and with the availability of the candidate in 
October, it made feasible the proposal to establish the department 
at this time. After a brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees establish 
a Department of Neurology at the University of 
Massachusetts at Worcester as set forth in Doc. 
T77-112. 

Chairman Troy then asked for a motion to enter executive: 
session in order to discuss personnel matters. At 11:55 a.m., it 
was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To enter into executive session. 
At 12:55 p.m., it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To end the executive session. 
Without discussion, it was moved, seconded and 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the President in the appointment by the 
Chancellor of Michael P. Riccards as Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences at the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston as set forth in Doc. 
T77-114. 



and further 



-3- 



F&EP Comm. 
5/25/77 

UM/Worcester — 
Merger of 
Departments of 
Community and 
Family Medicine 
and of Family 
Practice 
(Doc. T77-107) 



- UM/Worcester — 
Establishment 
of Department 
of Neurology 
(Doc. T77-112) 



Executive 
Session 



UM/Boston — 
Concurrence in 
Appointment of 
Michael P. 
Riccards as 
Dean of the 
College of Arts 
and Science 
(Doc. T77-114) 



«3 



398 



F&EP Comm. 
5/25/77 

UM/Amherst — 
Concurrence in 
Appointment of 
Charles Bestor 
as Professor 
of Music and 
Dance with 
tenure 
(Doc. T77-113) 



UM/Amherst, 

UM/ Bo st on and 

UM/Worcester — 

Promotions to 

Tenure 

(Doc. T77-111) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
in the appointment of Charles Bestor by the 
President as Professor of Music and Dance with 
tenure at the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst as set forth in Doc. T77-113. 

Trustee Burack voted nay and asked that the record show that she 
did so as she was opposed to granting tenure on appointment as a 
matter of principle. 

and also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
in the President's award of tenure to those 
faculty members named in Doc. T77-111 and the 
addenda thereto, at the University of Massachu- 
setts at Amherst, Boston and Worcester. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit-- 
tee and the meeting adjourned at 1:00 p.m. 



I 




Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

June 1, 1977; 11:00 a.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff : President Wood; Trustees Carlson, 



5391 



Clark, Gordon, Robertson, Rowland, Shearer, Spiller and Troy; 
Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Ms. Eichel, Assistant 
Secretary; Mr. Miller, Recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Chairman Healey 



Other Trustees : Trustees Baker, Batiste, Breyer , Burack, Marks 



McNeil, Morgenthau; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Mr. 
Parks representing Trustee Dukakis; Ms. Blues tone representing 
Trustee Fielding 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for Univeristy 
Policy; Ms. Hanson, Associate Vice President and Budget Director; 
Mr. Hester, Associate Vice President for Business Services; Mr. 
Bench, Associate Counsel 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor 
for Student Affairs; Mr. DeNyse, Personnel Director; Mr. Gulko, 
Budget Director; Mr. Beatty, Assistant Director for Budget and 
Institutional Studies; Professor Sulzner, Faculty Representative; 
Professor Brogan, Faculty Representative Designate; Faculty 
Senate Rules Committee; Professor Einhorn, Chairman; Professors 
Burke, Coffey, Jennings, O'Connor and Sufrin 



a- 



UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Martin, Faculty Represenpa 
tive 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor 
for Administration and Finance; Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 
Health Affairs; Dr. Catlin, Faculty Council Chairman 

Guest : Ms. Pinck, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 11:15 a.m. As Chair- 
man Healey was absent, Trustee Carlson assumed the chair. He 
called for discussion on the first item on the agenda, Policy on 
Duration of Service of Senior University Officials (Doc. T77-125) 
After a brief discussion, it was apparent that it would be im- 
possible to discuss the policy without at some time discussing 
individuals and at 11:25 a.m. it was moved, seconded and on 



5- 



Exec. Comm. 
6/1/77 



Executive 
Session 



Presentation 
by UM /Amherst 
Senate Rules 
Committee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

roll call unanimously 

VOTED : To enter executive session. 
At 12:40 p.m. it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To end the executive session. 

The meeting then turned to the fifth item on the agenda 
Presentation by the Senate Rules Committee — UM/ Amherst. The 
Committee was told by the faculty spokesman that Amherst was a 
campus in turmoil and that only the Trustees could restore stability 
The turmoil, he said, stemmed from a series of ad hoc administra- 
tive actions which seriously contravened Trustee policies and 
agreements in matters of governance. The situation, he said, 
was such that the Trustees should either strongly reaffirm past 
governance arrangements, and so inform the Amherst administration 
or replace the policies and agreements in an orderly fashion. 
The Faculty was aware, he said, that the advent of collective 
bargaining would affect governance. In the matter of planning, 
faculty had been refused access to the models and data on which 
the first stage of the plan was based, and had been informed 
that it would play no role in succeeding stages of the planning 
process. While faculty was not demanding that the administration 
should do planning, Trustee policy mandated some faculty involve- 
ment. This was not being done. 



Chairman Carlson said that as a Trustee he could not 
see that Board policy had been violated by the administration at 
Amherst, The interrelationship between the planning process and 
governance was a difficult one because of the timing elements 
involved. What had happened on the Amherst campus was that pre- 
liminary drafts, prepared at the legitimate request of the 
President, were seen by faculty as final plans which had Board 
approval. This was not so. Further, the Board had no intent 
of making tacit changes in governance. Governance would have 
to be re-examined in the light of collective bargaining and if 
this resulted in recommendations for change, the Board would 
consider them. 

In the ensuing discussion, a number of points were 
raised: the Board's attempts in the planning process to be aware 
of the nuances as well as the letter of governance, and the 
Board's determination that the most important segments of the 
University — the faculty and students — play an important role in 
planning were explained. It was noted that faculty concerns 
were not all centered on planning — apparently, the faculty felt 
Board messages to the administration were different from those 
sent by the administration to the faculty; also, faculty claimed 
that the administration at Amherst had unilaterally changed 
established governance, as evidenced by the suspension of faculty 
evaluation of departmental chairmen. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The meeting was told that this suspension was temporary 
and that it had been imposed because the guidelines for evalua- 
tions, in addition to being internally inconsistent, were in 
violation of provisions of the new federal Fair Information 
Practices Act. There was agreement that there should be new 
guidelines and this should be the result of a joint faculty/ 
administration effort. 

An assertion was made that overt and subtle forms of 
racism, directed at the Provost, so beclouded the issue that a 
logical judgment was made. This assertion was disputed. 

There was agreement that communication between the 
Board and the faculty should be on a more regular basis and that 
the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy was the proper 
vehicle for this communication. 

Finally, the Committee was informed that faculty came 
to the meeting seeing no culprits and bearing no animosity and 
the discussion had not changed this. Chairman Carlson thanked 
the Rules Committee for its presentation. 

The meeting then turned to the third item on the agenda, 
Ratification of S.E.I.U. Collective Bargaining Agreement — UM / 
Boston (Doc. T77-122) . As the agreement was, mutatis mutandis, 
the same as previously approved agreements, there was little dis- 
cussion and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 

the Agreement between the Trustees of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts and Local 285, Service 
Employees International Union, AFL-CIO, (Doc. 
T77-122) ; provided, however, that no wage in- 
creases as specified in said Agreement shall 
become effective until the Governor has trans- 
ferred sufficient funds to the University's 
maintenance accounts to meet the cost of the 
salary increases provided by said Agreement. 



O* 



Exec. Comm. 
6/1/77 



UM/Boston — 

Ratification 

of S.E.I.U 

Collective 

Bargaining 

Agreement 

(Doc. T77-122) 



UM/Worcester 
Group Practice 
Rules and 



The meeting then turned to the fourth item on the 
agenda, Group Practice Rules and Regulations — UM/Worcester (Doc. 
T77-121) . The meeting was told that the revised rules and re- 
gulations differed from those currently in force in that there wad Regulations 
a shift from the individual clinician to the clinical departments J (Doc. T77-121) 
thus ensuring more effective departmental budget planning; re- 
quirements that debts be repaid and that all members of the Group 
Practice would bear proportional responsibility for shortfalls 
were now included; as were creation of departmental educational 
funds , a reserve fund which would be used to help low-earning 
departments, and a Chancellor/Dean's discretionary fund. There 
was no further discussion and it was moved, seconded and 



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*> 



Exec. Conmi. 
6/1/77 



Policy on Dura- 
tion of Service 
of Senior 
University 
Officials 
(Doc. T77-125) 



Classification 

of Position 

Title 

(Doc. T77-110) 



UM/ Amherst — 
Concurrence in 
Appointment of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
and adopt the revised rules and regulations for 
the University of Massachusetts Medical School 
Group Practice (Doc. T77-121) as amended by 
striking the word "net" from line 10 of Section 
14, effective June 29, 1977 and to repeal the 
provisions of said rules and regulations established 
in Trustee Document T75-144A. 

The Committee was told that this action necessitated 
a "housekeeping" action to continue implementation of the fringe 
benefit program approved at the May meeting of the Board. There 
was no discussion and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the Chancellor/Dean of the University of 
Massachusetts at Worcester to continue implementa- 
tion of the fringe benefit program as approved 
by the Board on May 4, 1977, pursuant to the re- 
quirements of Sections 12 and 14 of the revised 
Rules and Regulations of the University of 
Massachusetts Medical School Group Practice 
(Doc. T77-121). 

Chairman Carlson said that actions taken during the 
executive session necessitated three further votes. There was 
no discussion and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
terms of office of the President, Chancellors, 
Vice Presidents, Vice Chancellors, the Treasurer 
and the Secretary of the University of Massachusetts 
shall extend no later than the 30th of June after 
they reach the age of 65; provided, however, that 
any such person may be appointed to serve the 
University in another capacity subsequent to the 
expiration of the term of office. 

Trustee Robertson abstained. 

and 



I 



VOTED 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the Classification of Position Title as detailed 
in Doc. T77-110. 



and also 

VOTED: 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur, 
along with the President, in the appointment by 
the Chancellor of James L. McBee, Jr. as Vice 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor for Administration and Finance at 
the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 
as detailed in Trustee Document T77-108. 

and further 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

approve the personnel action as set forth in 
Trustee Document T77-109. 

There being no further business to come before the 
Committee the meeting adjourned at 1:45 p.m. 



5403 



Exec. Comm. 
6/1/77 



Dorothy Eict4/l 




Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 



I 



Vice Chancellor 
for Administra- 
tion and 
Finance 
(Doc. T77-108) 

Personnel 

Action 

Doc. T77-109) 



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5404 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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NOT USED 



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ATTENDANCE : 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

June 1, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 

Room 308 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts /Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 



Trustees Gordon, Marks, Rowland, Troy; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer 
Johnson; Ms. Eichel, Recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustees Dennis and Spiller 



5 



ilt-tr 



)ther Trustees : Trustees Baker, Batiste, Burack, McNeil, Robert- 



ion and Shearer 



Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Ms. Hanson, Associate Vice President and Budget Director; 
lir. Hester, Associate Vice President for Business Services; Mr. 
Her, Associate Vice President for University Policy; Mr. Bench, 
Associate Counsel 

JM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Mr. 
3'Connell, Director, Associate Alumni 

JM/Boston: Mr. Baxter, Vice Chancellor for Administration and 



Finance; Professor Martin, Faculty Representative 

JM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor 



or Administration and Finance; Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 
lealth Services 

Suest : Ms. Pinck, Assistant Secretary of Educational Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 10:05 a.m. by Chair- 
nan Carlson. At the request of the Chairman, President Wood gave 
a Report on Status of FY 1978 Budget . He said that the House 
Vays and Means Committee had recommended a budget of $121.13 
nillion, which was now being considered by the full House. He 
said that the budget had passed on the first reading. Once the 
Dudget has passed the House, he said, it would go to the Senate, 
ind he hoped that it might be passed before the end of the fiscal 
/ear. As soon as the budget had passed, he said, the University 
would submit a deficiency budget for the Medical Center. While 
:he deficiency budget was being considered, however, it would be 
lecessary for the University to have contingency plans, and an 
action would be proposed later in the meeting to cover these 
:ontingency plans. 

Chairman Carlson asked Ms. Hanson, Budget Director, to 
explain the need for the second agenda item, Fund Transfers — 



Report on 
Status of FY 
1978 Budget 
Request 



UM/ Amherst — 
Fund Transfers 



*3^ 



40S 



B&F Coram. 
6/1/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



(Revision to UM/Amherst (Revision). Ms. Hanson said that revisions to the fund! 
Doc. T77-104) transfers approved by the Committee on May 18 were necessitated 

because of the need for contingency plans for the Hospital. She 
said that at the time the Amherst campus submitted the transfers 
contained in Doc. T77-104, it was not known that the campus would 
;be asked to help in providing contingency funds. There were 
other very minor changes, she said, which were made only since 
the revision allowed for last minute updating of transfers. 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the revised fund transfers for the Amherst 
campus as attached. 



UM/Amherst — 
Trust Fund 
Loan (Doc. 
T77-117) 



I 



UM/Amherst — 
Inter- 
collegiate 
Athletic Tui- 
tion Waivers 
(Doc. T77-101) 



Chairman Carlson next asked Ms. Hanson to speak to the 
third agenda item, Trust Fund Loan — UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-117) . 
Ms. Hanson explained that the University Counsel had always taken 
the position that the University, as a state institution, is not 
subject to the meal tax and, therefore, this tax has not been 
paid on meals served in the dining commons at UM/Amherst. The 
state Department of Corporations and Taxation this year took an 
opposing position and confiscated University checks in the 
amount of $462,832.99. The checks confiscated included some 
from UM/Boston, involving federal money: some for tuition re- 
payments; and some related to specific grants. The University 
has taken the matter to court, but in the meantime it must cover 
these checks. Counsel Bench said that a decision should be forth 
coming very shortly. Chairman Carlson said that in the event 
that there should be a delay, however, it was necessary to make 
money available, and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Chancellor of the Amherst campus be 
authorized to transfer $193,800 from the 
Boarding Hall Trust Fund, UM/Amherst, to meet 
immediate payments due in the various ad- 
vance accounts where funds have been impounded 
by the State Department of Corporations and Tax- 
ation. This transfer shall be considered an 
emergency loan and shall be repaid as soon as 
the impounded funds are released. 

The next item of agenda, said Chairman Carlson, was the 
matter of Intercollegiate Athletic Tuition Waivers (Doc. T77-101) 
He asked Trustee Shearer to report on the discussion of this 
matter by the Student Affairs Committee on May 24. Trustee 
: Shearer said there had been lengthy discussion at the meeting 
| and that questions raised at an earlier committee meeting had 
; been answered to the satisfaction of the Committee. She said 
that some of the members of the Committee had expressed concern 
about favoring one segment of the students over others. The 
addition of a new category of tuition waivers for students who 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

participate in activities or perform services of significant 
value to the University would be considered in August, she said, 
at which time the Committee on Student Affairs would review the 
entire tuition waiver policy. The Committee had recommended that 
the athletic tuition waivers be granted, with the understanding 
that they would be granted for one year only, since the commit- 
ment would be for a four-year period for each student who re- 
ceived a waiver. Chancellor Bromery said that Mr. John O'Connell 
Director of the Associate Alumni, would be reporting on Alumni 
contributions at the full Board meeting. It is difficult to 
bridge the gap from Amherst to Boston, he said, and the Univer- 
sity receives a considerable amount of visibility with the 
Alumni and with the Legislature through the athletic teams. 
Another factor to keep in mind, he added, is that revenues from 
games such as football, are helping to pay off the debt service 
on the stadium. Also, Title 9 requires that more resources go 
to other athletic activities, further depleting funds available 
for competitive sports. 

Trustee Marks commented that he thought the proposal 
had been advanced with a great deal of energy and skill; however, 
he had several problems with it . He said he thought it was ill- 
advised to consider athletic tuition waivers outside of the con- 
text of the entire tuition waiver policy. He was concerned, he 
said, about the apparent lack of student input and the fact that 
the proposal was advanced at a time when students were not on 
campus. He said further that he thought the proposal should not 
be put forward without guidelines other than those set by the 
Chancellor and the President. Guidelines, he said, were a 
Trustee responsibility. He said he felt the waivers would be 
received unfavorably at the State House, as other students would 
have to pay, indirectly, for the waivers to the athletes. As 
to the matter of bonding for the stadium, he said there were othe|r 
ways to solve this problem. He expressed his belief that an 
active Alumni Office, and not winning teams, increased alumni 
support. As evidence of that fact, he said, alumni support had 
been increasing even as support to athletics and athletic 
scholarships had been diminishing. He also questioned the 
ability of the Alumni Board to speak for the alumni as a whole. 
Support for athletics ebbed and flowed, he said, as the member- 
ship of the Alumni Board changed. He recommended voting against 
the proposal. 



Trustee Gordon said he disagreed with Trustee Marks as 
to the desirability of granting the tuition waivers to athletes. 
He said that in 1975 the football team won eight and lost two 
games, and that it was at about this time that alumni giving 
began to increase substantially. Football funding had been 
decimated, he said, as support to other programs had increased. 
Without funding, he said, the University would soon see the end 
of the football team. The proposed waivers would enable the 
team to continue its Yankee Conference schedule and to be 
competitive with the other teams in the conference, 



B&F Comm. 
6/1/77 



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b4oy 



B&F Comm. 
6/1/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Burack stated that she, too, opposed granting 
athletic tuition waivers. She said she felt it was discriminatory 
and unfair to students in other programs. 

Ms. Pinck said that although it had been reported that 
those who asked for financial aid received it, she questioned 
whether that meant that all needs were met. She felt the funds 
should be included in the financial aid package rather than by 
waivers. She said she was offended by the idea of bringing studenjts 
to campus to aid in paying off debts. 

Chancellor Bromery said that, in fact, students in re- 
sidence and dining halls were aiding in paying off debt service 
in those buildings. He said athletics played another role at 
UM/Amherst, and that was providing recreational activities on week 
ends in an area where there weren't many other recreational 
activities available. 



Trustee Batiste said that students were concerned that 
the waivers would not be distributed to athletic programs other 
than football. Since football teams practiced during the summer 
it was already too late to provide support for the team for this 
fall; therefore, she did not see any great harm in delaying actior 
on athletic waivers until the review of the entire waiver policy. 

Chairman Carlson said that it should be kept in mind 
that the tuition waivers in question represent some $48,000 out 
of over $1.25 million in tuition waivers, a small percentage of 
the total. 

Trustee Troy said no matter how people viewed athletics 
in general, it was a fact that football played a very special 
part in American university life. He said he could not conceive 
the University in the current American scene without a football 
team. He said he felt the University must be competitive with 
other colleges and universities in its class, and he felt that 
letting the football team go would have an adverse effect on the 
alumni; he favored strengthening the team. He, therefore, would 
support the proposal for the waivers. Trustee Gordon said the 
University of Massachusetts was the only public university he 
knew of that received no state funding for its athletic programs. 
He said the ABC telecast last year was the result of a good foot- 
ball team and the money received from the broadcast benefited 
other activities. He gave statistics on the support to athletics 
at other similar universities and compared the number of tuition 
waivers granted by those institutions to the number at the Univer 
sity of Massachusetts. He said the University of Massachusetts 
was losing Massachusetts athletes to these other institutions 
because of their more generous support. 

Trustee Marks said he felt that Trustee opinion would 
be divided on this issue and urged delaying action until the 
review of the entire policy. 



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«y 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood said that for seven years he had been 
iiscussing with the Presidents of other New England public univer- 
sities ways in which the Yankee Conference teams could approximate 
Ivy League sports. Within that context, he said, he would like 
to see the waivers approved. He said either more support must be 
obtained, or the University would have to go back to sandlot foot- 
ball. 

Chancellor Bromery said he favored a study of the entire 
tuition waiver policy, but meanwhile budget decisions must be 
made for next year and the study might come too late to save the 
team. Trustee Baker said she would vote in favor of the waivers 
only if guidelines for awards included strong recognition of 
affirmative action so that women's sports would benefit as well as 
the football team. On motion made and seconded, on roll call it 
was then 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Chancellor of UM/ Amherst be authorized to grant 
120 undergraduate athletic tuition waivers to 
Massachusetts residents as outlined in Doc. 
T77-101. 

The final agenda item, Contingency Plans for University 
Hospital — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-123) , was introduced by President 
Wood at the request of Chairman Carlson. He said that since the 
deficiency budget would probably not be approved before the end 
of the fiscal year, it had been necessary to make contingency 
plans to cover operation of the hospital until the money was 
forthcoming from the Commonwealth. He said the problem was 
primarily a matter of cash flow. The money to cover the hospital 
expenses would be borrowed from other university accounts and 
would be repaid as soon as money was received from the state. It 
was noted that this emergency loan would not adversely affect 
other university programs. 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the President to transfer, on a temporary basis, 
funds from various University trust fund accounts 
to the Hospital Services Trust Fund as follows: 



Parking & Transportation Trust 
Fund UMB 

Health Services Trust Fund UMB 

Food Services Trust Fund UMB 

Boarding Hall Trust Fund UMA 



75,000 

50,000 

30,000 

225,000 



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B&F Comm. 
6/1/77 



UM/Worcester — 
Contingency 
Plans for 
University 
Hospital 
(Doc. T77-123) 



*> 



B&F Coram. 
6/1/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Repayment of any transfers so made shall be 
completed with interest at 5 percent by no 
later than June 30, 1978. All interest paid 
shall be credited to the Trust Fund Interest 
account. 

Further, to recommend that the President be 
authorized to take whatever other administra- 
tive steps are necessary to assure an orderly 
close of the fiscal year for the University 
Hospital. 

The meeting adjourned at 11:00 a.m. 



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Dorothy Eifchel 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 




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ATTENDANCE: 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS 

June 1, 1977; 10:30 a.m. 
Room 311 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Robertson; Trustee 



McNeil; Mrs, 
recorder 



Blues tone representing Trustee Fielding; Mr. Miller, 



Absent Committee Members: Trustees Gordon, McNulty, Okin, 



Shearer 

Office of the President: Mr. Eller , Associate Vice President for 



University Policy; Mr. Bench, Associate Counsel 
UM/Amherst : Professor Friedman, Faculty Representative 



UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Ference, Group Practice 



Plan Administrator; Dr. Catlin, Faculty Representative. 

The meeting came to order at 10:37 a.m. Chairman 
Robertson introduced the first item on the agenda, Group Practice 
Rules and Regulations — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-121). He re- 
minded the Committee that a draft version of the proposed new 
rules and regulations had been discussed at the May 18 meeting. 
He indicated that in May, the Committee had been told that the 
proposed regulations differed from those currently in force in 
the following manner: a shift in the emphasis from the individua 
clinician to the clinical departments would ensure effective de- 
partmental budget planning; the requirements that debts be repaid 
and that all members of the Group Practice would bear proportion- 
al responsibility for shortfalls in income would be more 
equitable; and the creation of departmental educational funds, a 
reserve fund to help low earning departments, and a Dean's dis- 
cretionary fund would supplement the educational programs of the 
Medical School. 

Mr. Eller then explained that the proposed regulations 
at hand differed from the May 18 draft in three areas. First, 
the sections on Governance now conformed to the provisions of 
Chapter 733 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth. Second, 
the language of the regulations as a whole had been clarified. 
Third, the words "Chancellor /Dean" had been substituted for the 
word "Dean" throughout the document in order to reflect the 
existing administrative structure of the Worcester campus. 



UM/Worcester — 
Group Practice 
Rules and Regu- 
lations 
(Doc. T77-121) 



In the course of the discussion the Committee agreed 
to two minor changes in Doc. T7 7-121 — the word "on" in line 9 
on Section 3(b), Associate Members , was changed to "of"; the 



Health Affairs 
6/1/77 



UM/Worcester — 
Group Practice 
Fringe Benefit 
Program 



UM/Wo re ester — 
Medical Center 
By-Laws , 
Change of Date 
for Sub- 
mission of 
Revisions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

word "net" was deleted from line 10 of Section 14, Departmental 
Budgeting . There was no further discussion, and it was moved 



and seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

approve and adopt the revised rules and re- 
gulations for the University of Massachusetts 
Medical School Group Practice (Doc. T77-121) 
effective June 29, 1977, and to repeal the 
provisions of said Rules and Regulations 
established in Trustee Doc. T75-144. 

The meeting then turned to the second item on the agenda 
Group Practice Fringe Benefit Program — UM/Worcester. Chairman 



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' 



Robertson said that the above vote necessitated a "housekeeping" 
action to continue implementation of the fringe benefit program 
approved at the May meeting of the Board. There was no discussior 
and it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

authorize the Chancellor/Dean of the University 
of Massachusetts at Worcester to continue im- 
plementation of the fringe benefit program as 
approved by the Board on May 4, 1977, pursuant 
to the requirements of Section 12 and 14 of 
the revised Rules and Regulations of the 
University of Massachusetts Medical School 
Group Practice (Doc. T77-121) . 

The meeting then turned to the last item on the 
agenda, Medical Center By-Laws . The Committee was told that the 
Medical Center was awaiting the recommendations of the Hospital 
accreditation committee and that these suggestions would impinge 
on the By-Laws. For this reason a postponement of the deadline 
for submission of the By-Laws was necessary. After brief dis- 
cussion it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees change 
the date for the submission of revisions to 
the Medical Center By-Laws to October, 1977. 

There being no further business before the Committee, 
the meeting was adjourned at 10:57 a.m. 



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aa^-^-X-^ 




Dorothy Eicnel 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE : 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

June 21, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 
Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 
Trustees Dennis, Gordon, Troy; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson 
Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Marks, Rowland and Spiller 

Other Trustees : Trustee Batiste, Ms. Pinck representing Trustee 
Dukakis 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Ms. Hanson, Associate Vice President and Budget Director; 
Mr. Hester, Associate Vice President for Business Services 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vic£ 
Chancellor for Student Affairs; Mr. Kerrins, Treasurer, Student 
Government Association 

UM/Boston : Mr. Baxter, Vice Chancellor for Administration and 
Finance; Professor Martin, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor for Administration 
and Finance; Mr. Cathey, Controller 



Guests : Messrs. Parker and Wood of Standish, Ayer & Wood, Invest 
ment Counsel; Ms. Becker, student, UM/Boston 



The meeting was called to order at 10:10 a.m. by Chair- 
man Carlson, who asked for the Report of Investment Counsel . Mr. 
Parker distributed a chart which showed that common stocks had 
over the long term more than kept up with inflation and that they 
were attractive for investment. Inflation, he said, was expected 
to continue at a rate of about 5 to 6 percent, and the federal 
energy program would limit growth; however, positive factors were 
an improvement in the financial condition of U.S. industry, reduc- 
tion in the debt, and improvement in cash flow. 

The University Endowment Portfolio, he added, had good 
exposure with approximately 62 percent in common stocks, some 
capital spending beneficiaries and some growth stocks. The port- 
folio, he said, was a little heavy in utilities, and he, there- 
fore, recommended investment at this time in U.S. Treasury bonds 



On motion made and seconded, it was 



5413 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



B & F Comm. 
6/21/77 



Report of Sub- 
committee on 
South African 
Investments 



UM/Amherst — 
FY 1978 Revenue- 
Based Budget 
Summary 
(Doc. T77-078) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize and empower the Treasurer of the 
University, Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute the 
following transactions: 



MARKET 



I 



COLLECT 

$40,000 FNMA 

SELL 

$10,000 Mobil 
Oil 



Per Total 

Share $ Amount Income 

6%% 6/10/77 100 $40,000 $2,600 



8%% 2001 



104 10,400 850 



BUY 

$50,000 U.S. 

Treasury 



$50,400 $3,450 



7%% 2/15/84 101.5$50,750 $3,625 



President Wood abstained from the vote. 

Chairman Carlson asked next for a Report of the Subcom- 
mittee on South African Investments. Treasurer Johnson said that 
the subcommittee had held its fourth meeting earlier in the day, 
and that Trustee Batiste had been asked to report for the subcom- 
mittee. Trustee Batiste reported that the subcommittee was rec- 
ommending divestiture of holdings in three of the firms reviewed, 
seven had met the standards set by the subcommittee, five were 
currently under review and additional letters were being forwarded 
to the remaining five firms. The subcommittee, she said, hoped 
to have a complete report and recommendations for the Committee 
on Budget and Finance when it meets in August. 

Chairman Carlson asked next for consideration of the 
FY 1978 Revenue-Based Budget Summary — UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-078) , 
a draft copy of which had been circulated to the Committee previ- 
ous to the meeting. At the request of the Chairman, Ms. Kay 
Hanson, Budget Director, explained that as a result of Committee 
discussions last year, it had been decided to provide a summary 
document to Trustees rather than the detailed data necessary for 
campus use. The detail, however, is available for those Trustees 
who desire it. Some additional information will be provided be- 
fore the final summary document is circulated to the full Board 
of Trustees, she said, but the draft would be the basis for the 
Committee's review and comment. The revenue-based budget will 
become part of the operating budget that will come to the Commit- 
tee for its recommendation in August and to the Board for action 
in September. If this procedure proves satisfactory, she said, 
this format will be used for future submissions to the Committee 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and the Board. Since the fee-based budgets for UM/Boston and UM/ 
Worcester are less complicated, they will be presented in August. 

Chairman Carlson next asked Mr. Gulko, UM/Amherst Budget 
Director, to comment. Mr. Gulko explained that although the Uni- 
versity operated on a cash basis, many of the internal units op- 
erated on an accrual basis, making the reporting process more 
difficult. He said that upon reviewing the draft budget document 
it had been noted that it would be helpful to the Trustees if 
more information were provided, such as better identification of 
the reserve status of some of the accounts, and a summary of the 
financial position of various accounts. 



Several of the major enterprises, he said, had received 
external audits over the past year, namely the Continuing Educa- 
tion, the Campus Center, and the Residence Hall trust funds. Thel 
auditors, he said, had found a need for stronger business expertise 
in the Continuing Education unit. As a result, a trained account^ 
ant is being hired, and a business manager is being recruited. 
These positions will be funded from the Continuing Education Trust 
Fund. The position of accountant, he said, would not actually be f 
a new position, but rather a redefinition of an existing position. 

I 

Also as a result of the audit, an accounts receivable and accounts 
payable system is being instituted. 



With regard to the Campus Center, said Mr. Gulko, the 
University had been allocating 19 percent of the debt service to 
the garage. The auditors, he said, had not been able to verify 
this percentage figure. The auditors had also raised questions 
with regard to prior management practices and inventory control 
at the Campus Center. A new manager has been hired, he said, new 
control systems have been initiated and plans are underway to sup- 
plement the management staff. This was the first year that the 
Campus Center had operated under permanent financing, he said, and 
this had alleviated some of the problems related to debt service. 
Chairman Carlson asked that the management letter indicate the 
improvements that have been made since the time of the audit. 
President Wood asked Mr. Gulko to comment on what was being done 
to improve the deficit in the parking garage. Mr. Gulko said 
that the parking garage has been redefined as a parking facility 
and has been incorporated into the campus balanced parking and 
transportation system with the expectation that this will increase 
usage of the garage as a parking option, thereby increasing garage 
revenues. He said the garage would not, however, become a profit - 
making operation until such time as an increase in rates of ap- 
proximately 100 percent could be instituted. 



Considerable discussion ensued with regard to the opera 
tion of the Campus Center. The Board of Directors of the Center 
is composed entirely of students and there has been some disagree 
ment as to whether this body should be involved in day-to-day 
management activities or should rather be a policy-setting Board. 



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B & F Comm. 
6/21/77 



B & F Comm. 
6/21/77 



Guidelines 
for FY 1978 
Operating 
Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The need for professional management of the various activities 
of the Center was discussed. The members of the Campus Center 
Board were involved in the Search Committee for the new director, 
and it is hoped that this may alleviate some of the tensions 
between the policy-making and management groups. Management has 
improved over the last two years and last year the Campus Center, 
exclusive of the garage, showed a profit of $336,000. 

The Continuing Education audit, Mr. Gulko reported, 
was complete, the Campus Center audit has been received but the 
management letter is still in preparation and the Residence Hall 
audit is nearly finished. These activities will be audited again 
next year, he said, and in addition audits are planned for the 
Parking and Transportation System, the Student Health Services 
and the Dining Halls . The following year it is hoped that Athlet 
ics , the Fine Arts Center and possibly the Student Activities 
Fund can be audited. 

Chairman Carlson asked for clarification of several 
items in the budget and suggested that it would be helpful if ad- 
ditional information could be supplied in the document to explain 
in more detail how some of the figures were computed. Trustee 
Dennis asked if bad debts were a major problem. Mr. Woodbury 
replied that the cashing of bad checks and nonpayment of rents in 
the married students housing were problems, but on the whole bad 
debts were not a major problem on campus. 

Trustee Batiste questioned the practice of charging 
rental fees for the use of the Fine Arts Center by student groups 
since there is a student fee for this activity. Ms. Hanson asked 
Mr. Gulko to provide additional information with regard to the 
permanent reserves listed on p. xiii of the draft document. 
Treasurer Johnson suggested that when the final budget document 
is developed, it would be helpful to show both beginning and end- 
ing balances in the various activity accounts. Trustee Gordon 
requested that shortly after the new director for the Campus 
Center was on the job he be invited to meet with the Committee on 
Budget and Finance. Chairman Carlson asked that Ms. Hanson and 
Mr. Gulko determine an appropriate meeting for the Committee to 
hear from the new director. 

Because of the questions raised with regard to the Cam- 
pus Center, the Parking System, the Residence Halls and Student 
Activities, it was agreed to defer action on the budget document 
until a subsequent meeting. 

Chairman Carlson then asked for comment by the President 
on the Guidelines for FY 1978 Operating Budget . President Wood 
said that the Guidelines were the means by which the campuses 
reduced their budgets for major items proportionately to reflect 
the differences between the FY 1978 Maintenance Budget Request 
approved by the Trustees last October and the actual budget appro 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

priated by the Legislature. The guidelines, he said, maintain 
enrollment, maintain faculty workload, ask the campuses to give 
first priority, after these two factors, to the strengthening of 
student affairs, to a review of administrative costs, and to in- 
crease Library acquisitions. The campuses, he said, use the 
guidelines to make the appropriate dollar reallocations in the 
priorities established. 



B & F Comm. 
6/21/77 



Comments by 
Trustee Dennis 



Chairman Carlson then recognized Trustee Dennis, who 
had requested that the Committee discuss the general subject of 
auditing. One of the requests that the Governor had made to him with regard to 
when he had been appointed, he said, was that he look at the whole University 



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auditing situation at the University. He said that although he, 
personally, had had many discussions over the past year with Vice 
President Janis and Associate Vice President Hester about this 
subject, it had not yet been discussed at the level of the Commitf 
tee on Budget and Finance. He said that although he was aware 
that three audits had taken place this year on the Amherst Campus , 
he had not yet seen these audits. The Committee had, he said, 
discussed the State Auditor's Report, but there was no established 
program for the review of other audits. He said he was aware that 
Mr. Hester had been addressing issues for auditing the entire 
University, but he did not know what the process would be for the 
engagement of auditors, the determination of to whom they would 
report , when the reports would be made and what an appropriate 
response to the auditors would be. 



Mr. Hester said he had engaged the auditing firm of 
Hurdman & Cranstoun to consult with University officials and 
selected Trustees on what the audit scope of the University should 
be and how the activities could be segmented into audit categorie; 
At the present time, he said, the Federal Government audits certain 
contracts and grants, and the State Government audits certain ac- 
tivities. It is necessary to develop a scope statement that stip^ 
ulates the appropriate level of auditing to meet the needs of the 
University and to afford reasonable protection of assets to the 
Trustees. Then, he said, it is necessary to determine the volume! 
of activity; that is, to say how often various activities should 
be audited and to lay out an overall program on the scope and 
practice of audits. Within this program there must be interface 
between external and internal auditing. It is important that the 
Trustees and the University management have an adequate under- 
standing of the level of financial activities and the controls 
that now exist. Mr. Hester said that this was a multi-stage pro- 
ject. The contract he said is underway, the consultants are now 
at the interview stage, where they are studying the University 
accounting systems, after which they will move to discussions with 
the Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance and other ad- 
ministrators. The majority of the work in this stage will be com- 
pleted within two months, he said, after which they will move into 
the review stage. At the present, he said, trust funded opera- 
tions are not charged for internal audit activities. 



Audit Process. 



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5418 



B & F Comm. 
6/21/77 



Expression of 
appreciation 
to Chairman 
Carlson 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Carlson suggested that at an early date, Mr. 
Hester provide to the Committee a report on the status of the 
contract, with suggestions from the administrative officers as to 
what an appropriate method for considering the report of the con- 
sultants might be and what is expected to result from the study. 

Trustee Dennis said that he was concerned that the 
position of Vice President for Administration and Finance be 
filled with due haste, especially in view of the President's 
forthcoming departure. 

Ms. Hanson commented that this was Chairman Carlson's 
last meeting as a member of the Board of Trustees and thanked him 
for his wisdom, patience, insight and effort over the past four 
years, both as a Trustee and as a member and Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Budget and Finance. 

There being no further business, the meeting was ad- 
journed at 11:47 a.m. 



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LA^JL*-^-> 



Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE: 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

June 23, 1977; 9:30 a.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Shearer; President Wood; 
Trustees Baker, Batiste, Crain and McNeil; Mr. Callahan represent- 
ing Trustee Anrig; Ms. Pinck representing Trustee Dukakis; Secre 
tary Hardy; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustees Morgenthau, Okin and Romer 



Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Ms. Simmons, Assistant Vice President for Academic Af- 
fairs; Ms. Taylor, Assistant Director of the Budget 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student Af- 
fairs; Ms. Rees , President, Graduate Student Senate 

UM/Boston: Mr. James, Assistant Chancellor; Mr. Tubbs , Vice Chan-- 



5419 



cellor for Student Affairs; Ms. Van Ummersen, Associate Vice Chan- 
cellor for Academic Affairs; Professor Schwartz, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Feinblatt, Associate Dean for Student Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 9:50 a.m. Chairman 
Shearer called for discussion on the agenda item, Tuition Waiver 
Policy. The Trustees were given a precis of the history of tui- 
tion waivers at the University. Tuition was first waived for a 
single foreign student in 1912. In the years which followed, nu- 
merous additional categories of tuition waivers were established 
and in 1974 a review of the entire program was undertaken. Rec- 
ommendations stemming from the review were approved by the Board 
in 1975 and resulted in the establishment of three basic catego- 
ries of tuition waivers — as compensation, e.g., graduate assistants; 
as financial aid, mandated by statute in the case of veterans, 
discretionary in the case of foreign students; and courtesy tui- 
tion waivers, e.g., reciprocal programs with other institutions. 
The Board also introduced more stringent definitions of students 
eligible for tuition waivers, and eliminated certain categories 
of waivers; for example, dormitory counselors. These new policies 
resulted in a 25 percent decrease in total amount of waivers grant 
ed (excluding veterans) in the 1975-76 academic year. The Commit- 
tee was reminded that it had recommended and the Board, at the 
June 1, 1977, meeting had approved athletic tuition waivers with 
the understanding that the Committee would receive a comprehensive 
report on tuition waivers at its August meeting. 



Tuition Waiver 
Policy 






Student Affairs 

6 / 23 / 77 UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Trustees were then told that as part of the compre- 
hensive review a new category, "Tuition Waivers for Significant 
Service and Contributions to the University of Massachusetts," 
was being considered, and that the discussion of the new category 
would be a preliminary one. The draft proposal at hand had not 
been seen by all interested parties and was subject to additions 
and alterations prior to its being presented to the Committee for 
action. The waivers would be granted to those in-state undergrad- 
uates who participate in a University-sponsored activity; devote 
at least 300 hours per academic year in one area; and incur dif- 
ficulty in securing employment because of the time given to pro- 
viding significant service to the University. "Significant serv- 
ice" would be determined by an appropriate office/committee des- 
ignated by the Chancellors at Boston and Amherst. The number of 
such waivers granted would not exceed 2.5 percent of the FTE en- 
rollment on each campus. 

In the discussion which followed, a number of points 
were raised including the need to ensure that all students were 
aware of the various forms of financial aid available; the danger J 
that the proposed waivers would lessen the undergraduates ' under- 
standing that they should contribute to the well-being of the 
University without this necessarily leading to some form of re- 
compense; the recommendations that the contributions of plodders 
as well as stars be recognized in granting waivers; and the need 
to acknowledge the contributions of first-year students in like 
fashion. Ms. Rees , the Graduate Student representative, noted 
that this proposal was only for undergraduates, and that although 
graduate students receive waivers as graduate assistants, students 
involved in governance, for example, do not have the time to work, 
study and get involved in other activities as well. The Trustees j 
were urged to send additional suggestions or questions to the 
Secretary. 

UM/Boston — The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Student Sup 

Student Support port Services — UM/Boston. The Committee was reminded that it had 
Services agreed that the discussion on Support Services would be focussed 

on four critical areas — access to such services; retention of 
students; career opportunities and effective delivery of services 
The first two had been discussed at earlier meetings; at this 
meeting the discussion would deal with the last two. Relevant to 
the discussion was implementation of the report of an ad hoc com- 
mittee on support services, the "James Report." As the material 
distributed at the meeting indicated, proposed implementation of 
the report had caused some stir on campus. The major objection 
to the report was that it emphasized the development of organiza- 
tional structure without a sound rationale. The analysis of 
the various offices in the Student Services area was inadequate and 
there were no substantive recommendations regarding the roles 
and responsibilities of staff members. The Student Support Serv- 
ices Committee and the campus administration had resolved the 
immediate causes of the stir and were working jointly on a com- 



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Student Affairs 
6/23/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

prehensive report which would address the objections to the orig- 
inal report. Also, it was noted that administration of the oper- 
ation of Support Services was a campus responsibility, which was 
to be discharged in conformance to Trustee policy. The role of 
the President's Office was one of functional oversight and to en- 
courage the campus to allocate the necessary resources to the 
Support Services area. 

In the discussion which followed, it was noted that 
career counseling and placement had been reorganized and both 
areas now had a full-time director. Career counseling had func- 
tioned very well for a number of years and could be expected to 
improve under the new arrangements. Placement at the College of 
Arts and Sciences had not been effective. With the appointment 
of a director and the lifting of the ban on on-campus recruiting, j 
the College was now in a position to "market" its students and 
improvements in the area were expected. The College of Profes- 
sional Studies had an effective internship program as an integral 
part of the academic program and now had a placement office which 
contacts employers throughout the state seeking openings for grad-j- 
uates . The academic programs at the College of Public and Com- 
munity Services supplied students with the educational "component 
needed for employment and had a unique internship program wherein 
people employed by various state agencies enrolled in programs 
which enabled them to upgrade their career. It was noted that 
arrangements had been made to ensure that potential employers 
were not approached separately by placement staff from each of 
the Colleges. The Trustees were told that faculty did counsel 
students on career matters but the kind of counseling varied from 
faculty member to faculty member. The campus was urged to consid 
er measures aimed at making such counseling more uniform. 

At the conclusion of the discussion, the Committee was 
told that it would receive the final version of the James report 
and that the campuses would supply listings of the allocation of 
resources to student support services including, where appropriate 
the resources allocated to day care, the latter to be discussed 
at the next meeting. 

At 10:59 a.m. the Committee agreed to recess and re- 
convene at the conclusion of the special meeting of the Board. 

At 11:32 a.m. the meeting reconvened and agreed to con- 
tinue the discussion of the James report. The Committee was told 
that some of the criticisms levelled at the James report were 
based on a misunderstanding of the ad hoc committee charge, which 
was to make recommendations regarding the administrative organiza 
tion and resources of support services. The range of services 
and their effectiveness was not part of that committee's assign- 
ment. There was a sense of agreement among the Vice Chancellors 
of Academic Affairs and Student Affairs and the directors of the 
various support service area units that the array of services 



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Student Affairs 
6/23/77 



UM/Worcester— 
Placement 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

offered was needed and adequate and that the effectiveness of 
these services could be increased if they were organized in a more 
straightforward fashion and if their resources were increased. 

In the discussion which followed, several issues were 
raised, including the question of whether the ad hoc committee 
should have approached its assignment from a consumer point of 
view; whether the reorganization found a place for each service 
without knowing if the service was needed; the need for coordina- 
tion in order to have effective delivery of service; the danger of 
focussing on organizational simplicity and the consequent ignoring 
of needed function; the assertion that UM/Boston now had a support 
services structure that could be coordinated and would issue regu- 
lar reports, and finally, the campus's need for greater resources. 

Having discussed Placement services at UM/Boston, the 
meeting then turned to the agenda item, Placement — UM/Worcester . 
There was agreement that Medical School students had achieved 
good placement; one reason for this, the Committee heard, was 
that students spend part of their time with other hospitals, from 
which job opportunities often arise. About half the UM/Worcester 
students have accepted in-state residencies, and the University 
Hospital is also attracting out-of-state entrants to its residency 
and internship programs. 

With the interruption of the Committee's meeting by the 
special Board meeting, once again there was not enough time to 
complete this agenda item and the report on Placement services at 
Amherst would be taken up at a subsequent meeting. There was no 
further business to come before the Committee and the meeting was 
adjourned at 12:05 p.m. 



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Assistant/ .Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of 

Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

July 21, 1977; 10:30 a.m. 
Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

ATTENDANCE: | Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Spiller; President Wood; 
Trustees Burack, Clark, Dennis; Mr. Colby representing Trustee 
Winthrop; Treasurer Johnson; Ms. Eichel , recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees McNulty and Romer 



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Other Trustees : Trustee Crain; Ms. Pinck representing Trustee 
Dukakis 

Office of the President : Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Plan- 
ning; Mr. Brigham, Senior University Planner; Mr. Meehan, Univer- 
sity Consultant 

UM/Boston: Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and 



Provost; Mr. Prince, Director of Planning and Development 



The meeting was called to order at 10:40 a.m. by Chair- 
man Spiller, who called first for an Update on Bus Service — UM/ 
Amherst. He explained that the material being distributed to the 
Committee did not require action at this meeting, but was back- 
ground for two votes which would be required in September to amenc 
previous votes taken by the Board of Trustees. The amendments 
were required, he said, to include two additional towns, Sunder- 
land and Belchertown, in the bus service and to provide for execu- 
tion of a Land Use Agreement to allow construction and operation 
of a new bus maintenance facility. Vice President Robinson ex- 
plained, for the benefit of those Trustees who had not attended 
earlier discussions, that the bus system had been initiated with 
the aid of a capital grant from the federal government as a means 
of decreasing the amount of automobile traffic on campus. The 
system had been so successful that it was now being expanded. The 
University would contract with the Lower Pioneer Valley Regional 
Transit Authority to provide fare-free service, and the Authority 
would receive reimbursement from the state as well as receiving 
the federal capital grant. The expansion of the service would 
reduce the cost to the University for the parking and transportation 
system. 



UM/Amherst — 
Update on Bus 
Service 



UM/ Worcester-- 
Update on 



At the request of Chairman Spiller, Mr. Brigham intro- 
duced the topic of Parking — UM/Worcester , explaining that two 
contracts for site work were underway. The "Mall" area is already Parking 
in construction. A second contract is about to go out for bid, 
with anticipated construction to begin in mid- Sept ember. This 
contract, he said, would include most of the surface parking west 
of the Medical Center and the recreational area north of the builc - 



B&G Comm. 
7/21/77 



Central Office 
Location 



mg, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

FY 1977 capital outlay funds would cover these two contracts 



and the remainder of the site work would be delayed until such 
time as additional funds were available. 

Chairman Spiller then turned to the main agenda item, 
the Central Office Location , which was a matter of some urgency, 
he said, since the lease on One Washington Mall would expire in 
October of this year. Factors to consider in the relocation of 
the central office, he said, were the previous commitment of the 
Trustees to a strong central office and a facility with visibility 
an appropriate location convenient for the Trustees and which re- 
flects the position of the Trustees. The office should be convene 
ient also for others who will be coming to it, with good parking 
facilities, accessibility to public transportation and with space 
for Trustee Board and Committee meetings. 



At the request of Chairman Spiller, President Wood gave 
a brief history of the events which led to the office location at 
One Washington Mall. In 1969, he said, the Board, after considera- 
tion of the Marcus Report and discussion of experiences at other 
universities, had voted to establish a strong central office in a 
location separate from the campuses and close to the seat of gov- 
ernment. He and the Treasurer, he said, had looked at space to 
fit the criteria established by the Trustees and within cost limi- 
tations. The central office, he said, began in space over Sage's 
Market, moved to 85 Devonshire Street on an interim basis and then 
to One Washington Mall at the end of two years. State law for 
leasing space, he said, was rather cumbersome, making it more at- 
tractive for state agencies to request capital outlay for meeting 
their space requirements. Only second-rate rental space was like- 
ly to receive the many required approvals. When, therefore, space 
was rented at One Washington Mall, the state comptroller had orig- 
inally held up payment of the rent, and it had been necessary to 
seek legal action. The right of the Trustees to rent space had 
been upheld, but the result had been to make One Washington Mall 
a controversial location. 

Consideration of office location options has awaited 
conclusion of the budget debate since various restrictive stipula- 
tions had been proposed. Final legislation had included no general 
restriction, but money had been appropriated only sufficient to 
cover the rent until the expiration of the current leases, and the 
language provides that state funds not be used for One Washington 
Mall after that time. The Trustees have the option of finding a 
new location which will be state funded, or of seeking space in 
present University facilities. Space is currently opening up in 
desirable downtown locations, and it is possible to stay at the 
present location on a month-to-month basis. It is only possible 
to remain at One Washington Mall, however, if the Trustees have 
a plan to relocate the office; without a plan the Legislature 
would see this as an attempt not to move. 



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The report of the internal space committee, which was 
circulated to the Committee, offered several recommendations, 
said President Wood, and he had also sought advice from an outside 
consultant, whose response had been circulated to the Committee. 
Space at 100 Arlington Street had also been considered. 

Discussion ensued on the various aspects to be consider- 
ed. It was suggested that two basic assumptions in planning for 
relocation might be invalid: 1) that the previous commitment of 
the Trustees to a strong central office would have the support of 
the current Board, and 2) that the new administrator would wish 
to continue the same administrative and staffing patterns as the 
present administration. It was conceivable that a new executive 
would have new ideas, not necessarily better or worse, but differ- 
ent. It was noted that the new office might be better designated 
the "Central Office" rather than the "President's Office." It 
was also suggested that although to move the Central Office befor^ 
the arrival of a new president might inhibit his or her staffing 
plans to some extent, waiting too long to make the move might 
result in the loss of desirable office space. It was pointed out 
that any space obtained would be flexible enough to accommodate 
various staffing patterns and that since some three months would 
be required for planning and construction work before new offices 
could be ready for use, a decision must be made at an early date. 
Should the Trustees decide that the central office should move to 
100 Arlington Street, a minimum of eighteen months would be re- 
quired for renovation after capital outlay appropriation is se- 
cured for the necessary changes. Moving to 100 Arlington Street 
would, therefore, mean that interim office space would be required 
for a minimum period of three years; therefore, a move from One 
Washington Mall must be made in any event. It was also emphasizejl 
that the prestige of the University should be considered in any 
move and that the kind of space provided should reflect the statu 
of the central administration of a major university. 

After considerable discussion of the various factors of 
concern, it was agreed to postpone action until the Boston Campus 
had presented its plans for the use of 100 Arlington Street, aftej: 
which the Trustees would have a better sense of the feasibility 
of moving the University administration to that location. It was 
noted that until this determination is made, it would not be 
feasible to consider other options, as the Legislature was aware 
that 100 Arlington Street was not fully occupied and would, there- 
fore, question the need for renting additional space. Ms. Pinck 
offered to discuss with the Secretary of Administration and Fi- 
nance the likelihood of obtaining a capital outlay appropriation 
for renovating 100 Arlington Street. It was the sense of the 
meeting that Spaulding and Slye should be informed that the Uni- 
versity may wish to remain on a month-to-month basis for several 
months after the expiration of the lease. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:05 p.m., with the under- 



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7/21/77 



B&G Comm. 
7/21/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

standing that the Committee would meet in August for a presenta- 
tion on long-term alternatives for the use of 100 Arlington Stree : 
and to continue discussion of the location of the central office. 



Dorothy EicMl 

Assistant Secretary to the Board 
of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

July 28, 1977; 12:00m. 
Faculty Conference Room 
Medical Sciences Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Clark, Gordon, Robertson, Rowland, Troy; Secretary 
Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Shearer and Spiller 

Other Trustees : Trustees Baker, Batiste, Burack, Crain, Kassler, 
Marks, McNeil, Morgenthau, Romer; Mr. Callahan representing 
Trustee Anrig; Mr. Parks representing Trustee Dukakis; Ms. Blue- 
stone representing Trustee Fielding 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Bench, 
University Counsel; Mr. Cooley, Associate Vice President for 
Analytical Studies; Ms. Hanson, Associate Vice President and 
Budget Director; Mr. Hester, Associate Vice President for Business 
Services; Fr. Walsh, Academic Advisor to the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Beatty, Associate Director, 
Budgeting and Institutional Studies; Mr. Hogan, Controller; 
Professor Burke, Secretary, Faculty Senate; Professor Brogan, 
Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and 
Provost; Mr. Barbaro, Co-chairperson, University Assembly; 
Professor Schwartz, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor 
for Administration and Finance; Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 
Health Affairs; Mr. Smith, Provost; Mr. Cathey, Controller 



The meeting was called to order at 12:15 p.m. and turnecjjl 
to the first item on the agenda, Hospital Financial Operations — 
UM/Worcester , a. Establishment of Trust Fund . The Committee was 
told that legislative approval of the establishment of a Hospital 
Trust Fund was one of the major accomplishments of the FY78 ap- 
propriations act. The operating procedures of the Trust Fund 
will expedite the processing of receipts and disbursements. Each 
day all monies received by the Hospital will be deposited to the 
University's bank account. The Medical Center will then inform 
the University Treasurer, who in turn will transfer the funds by 
wire to the State Treasurer. The funds will then be immediately 
available for disbursement. Each month a full financial report 



UM/Worcester— 
Hospital 
Financial 
Operations 
a. Establish- 
ment of Trust 
Fund 



Exec. Comm. 
7/28/77 



UM/ Worcester — 

Hospital 

Financial 

Operations 

b. Fund 

Transfer 

(Doc. T78-002) 



UM/Worcester — 

Personnel 

Actions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

will be made to the appropriate State officials and the Trustees. 

The Committee was reminded that the Governor and the 
Secretary for Educational Affairs had supported the establishment 
of the Trust Fund and both felt it was a move in the right direc- 
tion. There was no further discussion and it was moved, seconded 
and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, in 
accordance with the provisions of Item 7411- 
1006 of Section 2 of Chapter 363A of the Acts 
of 1977 (the appropriation for the Teaching 
Hospital of the University of Massachusetts at 
Worcester) , those officers of the University 
or of the Medical Center heretofore or from 
time to time authorized by the Board of Trustees 
to receive and disburse University funds, and 
whose names are currently or may from time to 
time be placed on file with the State Comptroller, 
be further authorized to receive and disburse 
the funds appropriated under said Item 7411- 
1006, as well as funds deposited in the trust 
fund established in the State Treasury by said 
Item; said officers to be directed to account 
for said receipts and disbursements in accordance 
with established University and standard state 
accounting procedures, and to report monthly to 
the Board of Trustees, the President, the Com- 
missioner of Administration and the House and 
Senate Committees on Ways and Means; provided , 
that all expenditures shall be within the scope 
of the maintenance and operating budgets approved 
by the Board of Trustees from time to time for 
said Teaching Hospital, and provided , further, 
that funds shall be available therefor. 

The meeting then turned to the next agenda item, Hospi- 
tal Financial Operations — UM/Worcester , b. Fund Transfer . The 
Committee was told that the FY78 appropriation provided a $3.5 
million subsidy for the maintenance and operation of the Teaching 
Hospital. The money had been allocated to the 01 Account (State 
funded salaries) ; therefore fund transfers were necessary. After 
a brief discussion it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
fund transfers among subsidiary accounts at the 
University of Massachusetts at Worcester, as 
detailed in Trustee Document T78-002. 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Personnel 
Actions — UM/Worcester. At 12:33 p.m., after a brief discussion, 
it was moved, seconded and 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To enter into executive session. 

At 1:15 p.m., with the understanding that the meeting would re- 
convene as the full Board and immediately enter executive session 
it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To end the executive session. 




£*Xc^ 



Dorothy Eichej 
Assistant Secretary to the Board 
of Trustees 



Exec. Comm. 
7/28/77 

Executive 
Session 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

August 3, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Troy; Trustees Burack, 
Crain; Ms. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding; Mr. Colby 
representing Trustee Winthrop 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Batiste, Breyer and Morgenthavi 



Other Trustees: Trustee Baker 



Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs 

UM/Amherst : Ms. Chappell, Associate Provost; Mr. Whaley, Dean, 
College of Food and Natural Resources 

UM/Boston : Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and 
Provost 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Smith, Provost 



The meeting was called to order at 10:10 a.m. Chairman 
Troy noted that the agenda dealt only with personnel matters and 
asked for a motion to go into executive session. At 10:12 a.m. 
it was moved, seconded and on roll call, 

VOTED : To enter executive session. 

At 11:21 a.m. it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED : To end the executive session. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
in the President's award of tenure to those 
faculty members named in Doc. T77-111, addendum 
3, of July 21, 1977. 

and further 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
in the appointment of Bruce MacDougall by the 
President as Professor of Landscape Architecture 
and Regional Planning with tenure at the Univer- 



Executive 
Session 



UM/Amherst, 

UM/Boston — 

Promotions to 

Tenure 

(Doc. T77-111) 



UM/Amherst — 
New Appointment 
with Tenure 
(Doc. T78-009) 



F&EP Comm. 
8/3/77 



UM/Worcester — 
New Appointment 
with Tenure 
(Doc. T78-010) 



Tenure Appeal 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

sity of Massachusetts at Amherst as set forth 
in Doc. T78-009. 



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and also 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
in the appointment of David Drachman by the 
President as Professor of Neurology with tenure 
at the University of Massachusetts at Worcester 
as set forth in Doc. T78-010. 

Chairman Troy asked that the record show that in the 
matter of item 5 of the agenda, Tenure Appeal , the Committee had 
agreed to ask the President to review the case and make a recom- 
mendation to the Committee. 

The Committee then discussed the advisability of meet- 
ing with the Student Affairs Committee in early September to dis- 
cuss tuition waivers. It was noted that at the next regular 
meeting of the Committee, or possibly at the meeting with the 
Committee on Student Affairs, a full report on admissions would 
be distributed. In the discussion, it was apparent that the 
Trustees felt the need for a full report on financial aid, includ- 
ing a description of the kinds of aid, the criteria for awarding 
aid, and the costs thereof. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit 
tee and the meeting adjourned at 11:50 a.m. 



Dorothy EiMhel 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 




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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

August 11, 1977; 9:30 a.m. 
Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Healey; President Wood; 



Trustees Robertson, Shearer and Troy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. 
Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Clark, Crain, Gordon, Rowland 
and Spiller 

Other Trustees : Trustees Baker, Burack, Kassler and Marks; Mr. 
Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Ms. Bluestone representing 
Trustee Fielding 

Office of the President : Ms. Robinson, Vice President for 
Planning; Mr. Cooley, Associate Vice President for Analytical 
Studies 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Allen, Dean, Humanities and Fine Arts; Professor 
Burke, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston: Mr. James, Assistant Chancellor 



UM/Worcester : Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs 



Guest : Ms. Shukri, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 

The meeting came to order at 9:35 a.m. Chairman Healey 
spoke to the second item on the agenda, Approval of Nominations 
for Trustee Members of Presidential Search Committee . Those 
nominated were Trustees Dennis, Gordon, Morgenthau, McNulty and 
Troy. Trustee Troy had agreed to serve as chairman of the 
Committee until such time as the full committee had been em- 
paneled. After a brief discussion, the Chairman asked if there 
were any objections to the nominees. There were none. 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Concept of 
Central Office within the University. President Wood noted that 



Approval of 

Nominations 

for Trustee 

Members of 

Presidential 

Search 

Committee 



Discussion 
of Concept 



the survey prepared on central administrative staffing and offices of Central 



at fifteen universities was to be taken as illustrative. There 
were major variations among the universities in the number of 
campuses and students and in the distribution of administrative 
responsibilities. The most common pattern, however, was for the 
central administrative offices to be located off-campus in a 
University-owned building. In the discussion which followed, 
it was noted that the leases at One Washington Mall would expire 



Office 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in October, 1977, and that the offices could continue to be 

occupied on a tenant-at-will basis. However, state funds could 

not be used for rental purposes after October 1, 1977 and rent 

money would have to be taken from trust funds. 

The discussion then turned to 100 Arlington, a Uni- 
versity-owned building. The building requires some substantial 
repairs and upgrading. In the five-year capital outlay request 
submitted in FY78, the University had asked for funds to renovate 
six floors in the building on a modest scale. Since this renova- 
tion was targeted for FY79, the request was automatically 
categorized as essential rather than urgent. This ranking was 
reduced to long range in the Governor's request. If the Trustees 
decide to move the President's Office to 100 Arlington, an 
accelerated capital outlay request would have to be made. 

Trustee Burack suggested that what was needed was a 
declaration of intent on the part of the Board to move the 
President's Office to 100 Arlington and an "urgent" request for 
the necessary capital outlay funding. Given such a declaration, 
there would probably be legislative acceptance for occupying 
One Washington Mall for a reasonable period on a tenant-at-will 
basis. 

The Committee was told that a proposal for the reno- 
vation of 100 Arlington as a University Center would be presented 
to the next meeting of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 
The proposal would include a budget and schedule for renovation, 
provision for maintaining on-going activities in the building, 
and an overall space program. The proposal tries to avoid any 
sense of "rich folks-poor folks" as between the University admin- 
istration space and the space used for campus activities. The 
possibility of renovating four floors as a first phase — two floor§ 
for the College of Public and Community Service and two floors fo:j: 
the President's Office will also be presented. This could be 
completed in 22-23 months after appropriation of funds using 
standard BBC procedures. 

The point was made that if the decision was made to 
move to 100 Arlington and if the Board expected legislative/exec- 
utive support for such a move, there would have to be a realistic 
commitment as to time. Trustee Kassler suggested that twenty-two 
months would not be seen as realistic. A number of options to 
speed up a move of the administrative offices from One Washington 
Mall were then discussed. These included the option of other 
commercial space; the possibility of moving the office to 100 
Arlington after a modest renovation, followed by a more complete 
one; and the possibility of moving temporarily to the Harbor 
Campus. Treasurer Johnson reminded the Committee that when the 
University purchased 100 Arlington, renovations were covered by 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a special appropriation and work was performed under the control 
of the University. The work was completed in much less time than 
if it had been done through regular state construction procedures, 

There was general agreement that an off-campus location 
was to be preferred for the central office, but that the Trustees 
should be informed as to the availability of on-campus space. No 
one, however, saw 100 Arlington as an on-campus facility. 

In response to the Chairman's question, the Committee 
agreed that the Buildings and Grounds Committee should be asked 
to explore the ramifications of moving the central office to 
100 Arlington Street and that this be done with as much expedition 
as was reasonable and possible. 

There was no further business to come before the 
Committee and the meeting adjourned at 10:40 a.m. 



Exec. Comm. 
8/11/77 




OcoL^^ 



Dorothy Eachel 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

August 26, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Spiller; President Wood; 



Trustees Clark, Dennis, McNulty and Romer; Mr. Colby representing 
Trustee Winthrop; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Committee Members Absent: Trustee Burack 



Other Trustees : Mr. Parks representing Trustee Dukakis 



Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cooley, 
Associate Vice President for Analytical Studies; Ms. Hanson, 
Director of the Budget; Mr. Hester, Associate Vice President for 
Business Services; Mr. Meehan, Consultant to the Planning Office 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Littlefield, Director of Planning; Mr. Murphy, 



Transit Service 

UM/Boston: Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 



Mr. Baxter, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance; Mr. 
Prince, Director, Physical Plant; Mr. Strange, Dean, College of 
Public and Community Service; Mr. Rubin, Associate Dean for Aca- 
demic Affairs; Ms. Cedrone, Assistant to the Dean 

Guests: Ms. Shukri, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



The meeting came to order at 10:15 a.m. Chairman 
Spiller introduced the agenda item, Extension of Bus Service — 
UM/Amherst. He noted that the item had been discussed at a previ- 
ous meeting and that the documentation had been in the hands of 
the Trustees for some weeks. After a brief discussion, during 
which Mr. Murphy assured the Committee that the proposal was 
acceptable to the Amherst students, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees amend 
its vote of May 5, 1976, to include an author- 
ization to the Chancellor of the Amherst campus 
to negotiate and execute agreements with the 
Towns of Belchertown and Sunderland for submis- 
sion of joint petitions for funding, operation 
and provision of bus services, so that said 
vote shall read as follows: 



VOTED: 



To authorize the Chancellor of the 



UM/Amherst- 
Extension 
of Bus 
Service 



B&G Comm. 
8/26/77 



Central Office 
Location 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 
in consultation with the President of 
the University, to negotiate and execute 
agreements with the Towns of Amherst, 
Belchertown and Sunderland, to submit 
with said Towns joint petitions to the 
Pioneer Valley Transit Authority for the 
funding and operation of a transit sys- 
tem, and to negotiate and execute oper- 
ating contracts with the Pioneer Valley 
Transit Authority to provide bus services 
as described in the agreement with the 
Towns of Amherst, Belchertown and Sunder- 
land, the joint petitions and Trustee 
Documents T76-074 and T78-014. 



I 



and further 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize the Chancellor of the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst, in consultation 
with the President of the University, to 
execute an agreement with the Pioneer Valley 
Transit Authority for the use of land at the 
Amherst campus for the construction and 
operation of a bus maintenance facility as 
set forth in Document T78-014. 



The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Central 
Office Location. Chairman Spiller reminded the Committee of the 



I 



discussions concerning the location of the Central Office at the 
July 28, 1977 meeting of the Board. At the conclusion of that 
discussion it was suggested that the Executive Committee meet 
and discuss the matter more fully. The Executive Committee met 
on August 11, 1977, and it was the sense of the meeting: that the 
Buildings and Grounds Committee should explore the ramifications 
of relocating the Central Office as quickly and as economically 
as possible; further, that the Central Office should be located 
off-campus; and finally, given that 100 Arlington Street seemed 
to be the most acceptable location and was not seen by most Trus- 
tees as an on-campus facility, how the building could best be usee 

President Wood reminded the Committee that at their 
last meeting they had discussed alternative locations for the 
Central Office including commercial space and 100 Arlington 
Street. The focus of this meeting would be to consider alterna- 
tive uses of 100 Arlington. Discussions had been held with Vice 
Chancellor Steamer to determine the immediate campus needs of 
the College of Public and Community Service. The Planning Of- 
fice had then prepared the reports now at hand. The reports as- 
sumed that 100 Arlington had long-range possibilities as a 
University-wide facility, part of which would be appropriate as 



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B&G Comm. 
8/26/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the location of the Central Office. The reports presented rea- 
sonable and possible alternatives for renovating all or part of 
the building. Should the Committee decide to recommend the devel- 
opment of 100 Arlington, two other issues would have to be dis- 
cussed — a capital outlay of $4 to $5 million, and interim space 
options . 

Trustee Clark reminded the Committee that long-range 
plans for 100 Arlington should consider the needs of the College 
of Public and Community Service. She thought it was apparent 
that there would be no more building at Columbia Point; thus the 
College could not move there as had been planned. She said that 
she would like to hear what the College's plans were before con- 
sidering other uses of the building. 



Mr. Strange said that for some time consideration had 
been given to 100 Arlington as a life-long learning center. The 
College now occupied seven floors and thought had been given to 
further expansion to provide space for educational offerings of 
the College of Arts and Sciences, and the College of Professional 
Studies as well as the CPCS. For example, part of the instruc- 
tional program of the drama program at Columbia Point could be 
offered at 100 Arlington. The community linkages of the College 
of Public and Community Service, one of its goals, could be 
enhanced by making the present art gallery a public service gal- 
lery. In the past year three enormously successful community 
interest art shows had been offered, and there had been many 
requests for additional shows. Mr. Strange also indicated there 
was space in the building that would be ideal for conferences, 
which could be used by both University and community groups. In 
addition, a University information center could be established in 
the building. Given the building's potential as a life-long 
learning center and given that the College of Public and Community 
Service, a growing institution, now occupied half the building, 
he questioned if it could also be used as a central office facil- 
ity. The point to be remembered was that there was an educational 
purpose for the building and the Trustees should not make decisions 
which would undermine that purpose. He said he found it odd that 
the building was seen as an off-campus location. He felt it was 
very much part of the educational mission of the University. 
Chairman Spiller said that the Trustees also considered the Col- 
lege of Public and Community Service as part of the University. 
However, it was part of the University managed by the Harbor Cam- 
pus, and locating the Central Office at 100 Arlington would not be 
seen as a threat to that management. If the Central Office were 
to be located on either the Harbor Campus or at Amherst, ambigu- 
ities of leadership would arise. 

Ms. Robinson said that Mr. Strange 's proposals were not 
inconsistent with the Planning Office's recommendations for the 
use of 100 Arlington. However, because of the location of sup- 
porting columns and other factors, the building would not be 



B&G Coram. 
8/26/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

satisfactory for classrooms and studios and should not be viewed 
as a permanent substitute for facilities at the Harbor Campus. 
She noted that the Five-Year Capital Outlay Budget included pro- 
visions for the construction of the Arts and Science Building at 
Columbia Point. This building, which could complete the campus, 
could also accommodate the CPCS. 

In reply to Trustee Romer's question concerning the 
principal purpose of 100 Arlington, Mr. Strange said that he felt 
that a center for life-long learning should be its major use; 
that contemplated renovations would not reduce the need for the 
Arts and Science Building at Columbia Point; and that UM/Boston 
could, in the future, use all of 100 Arlington. Ms. Robinson 
pointed out that the real need of many of the operations now in 
100 Arlington, e.g. the University Without Walls and the Institute 
for Learning and Teaching, was for additional office space. 

Trustee Clark pointed out that the issue to be decided 
was where the Central Office was to be located after October 1. 
President Wood said discussions of the Executive Committee and 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds indicated that it should 
be possible to occupy 1 Washington Mall on a tenant-at-will basis 
until the Trustees decided where the Central Office should be 
located. He cautioned, however, that if the Board did not decide 
this matter, the Executive and the Legislature would interpret 
this as stalling. Mr. Parks said he agreed that the real issue 
was to reach a serious decision. Given that decision, he would 
take a position to expound with the Governor, that occupancy of 
the present offices on a tenant-at-will basis, if the time of 
such occupancy were reasonable, should be approved. To move the 
President's Office more than once would simply reduce the funds 
available for renovation of the new offices. Trustee Dennis said 
that making a decision to move into space that needs renovating 
would necessitate a commitment from the Office of Administration 
and Finance. Mr. Parks said that if the decision to move needed 
approval of the Office of Administration and Finance, he would 
recommend such approval. He said such approval would probably 
be forthcoming if the standards of A&F were met. 

Ms. Robinson said the question whether 100 Arlington 
was to be a permanent University facility still had to be ad- 
dressed. Obviously, this question would have bearing on the 
amount of renovation required and the time needed to complete 
the move. Also, since the procedures of the Bureau of Building 
Construction were geared to construction rather than renovation, 
efforts should be made to renovate 100 Arlington outside the 
BBC's procedures. 

President Wood said that the Presidential candidates 
would have to know what to expect in terms of office space. 
Trustee McNulty said that she approved the proposal of 100 
Arlington Street as a University Center and she felt it should be 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a permanent establishment. Trustee Clark agreed that the proposal 
made sense; however, she did not want to see the CPCS smothered. 
She said she would not support a move at the expense of the Col- 
lege. 

Chairman Spiller said the Committee appeared to be 
ready to frame a recommendation. In his view, he said, the key 
point seemed to be the level of renovation — that is, window 
dressing only or a complete renovation. Mr. Parks suggested that 
the job should be phased but the whole building should be reno- 
vated. The Chairman then asked Mr. Strange if he could put to- 
gether a perquisite chart plus a program showing projected devel- 
opment over a three-year period. He noted that the Trustees 
would need to see a tangible project in order to judge its merits. 
Chairman Spiller said the discussion indicated that three things 
would have to be outlined — space demands; a staged planning 
process; and the necessary funds. 

Mr. Meehan said that most of this information was con- 
tained in the document at hand and that total renovation would 
cost about $4 million. If the renovation had to be done follow- 
ing BBC procedures, the job would take about three and a half 
years following the appropriation. However, renovating four 
floors, to satisfy the immediate needs of the CPCS and a central 
office, working without BBC strictures, could be done in six or 
seven months at a cost of $1 million or less. 

Mr. Strange said the discussion seemed to indicate that 
the Board would have to act on three recommendations — firstly, 
that any decision as to the use of 100 Arlington would not af- 
fect the need for further construction at Columbia Point; second- 
ly, the primary use of 100 Arlington should be identified, 
preferably the Board should decide that the building was to be 
a life-long learning center and part of the urban mission of the 
Boston campus; and third, if a portion of the building was to be 
used for the Central Office, then the standards of renovation 
should be uniform throughout the building. President Wood said 
he disagreed with the implication that life-long learning was 
equivalent with the CPCS. Life-long learning was one facet of 
continuing education, and any Board decision in this area should 
speak to the University as a whole. At present, he noted, 
Worcester was the most active campus in the field of continuing 
education. 

Chairman Spiller said the Committee appeared to have 
reached a consensus and asked if it would be possible to have 
this in written form. President Wood said this would be done in 
the form of a short memo and a vote. The memo would contain 
these elements: a) a commitment to the renovation and use of 100 
Arlington; b) a statement that any investment in the building 
should be consistent with standards of permanent location; c) 
an understanding that the Committee foresees life-long learning 



B&G Comm. 
8/26/77 



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B&G Comm. 
8/26/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

as an expanding activity of the University, and that 100 Arling- 
ton as a location for some of these activities is entirely appro- 
priate. 

Chairman Spiller said he would not be able to attend 
the next Board meeting and asked which Committee member would 
like to present the proposal to the Board. Trustee McNulty 
agreed to do this. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit- 
tee and the meeting adjourned at 11:30 a.m. 



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Dorothy Eifeiel 
Assistant Secretary to the Board 
of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE: 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

August 31, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Crain; President Wood; 



Trustees Dennis, Marks and Troy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Miller, 
recorder 

Committee Members Absent: Trustees Gordon, Rowland and Spiller 



Other Trustees: Trustee Batiste 



Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Ms. Hanson, Associate Vice President and Budget Director; 
Mr. Hester, Associate Vice President for Business Services; Mr. 
Cooley, Associate Vice President for Analytical Studies; Ms. 
Taylor, Assistant Director of the Budget; Mr. Hogan, Controller 

Institute for Governmental Services: Mr. Donahue, Director; Ms. 



Randolph, Program Coordinator 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Woodbury, Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Mr. McBee, Vice Chancellor for Administration 
and Finance; Mr. Beatty, Assistant Director of the Office of 
Budget and Institutional Studies; Mr. DeNyse, Director of Person- 
nel and Financial Services; Ms. Tillona, Special Assistant to 
the Chancellor; Mr. Pill, Co-Chairperson, Campus Center Student 
Union Board of Governors; Mr. Federow, student 

UM/Boston: Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and 



Provost; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Mr. 
Baxter, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor 



for Administration and Finance; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Mr. 
Fellner , Budget Director 

Guests: Ms. Shukri, Executive Office of Educational Affairs; 



Messrs. Parker and Wood, Standish, Ayer and Wood, Investment 
Counsel 

The meeting was called to order at 10:05 a.m. Chairman 
Crain asked for discussion on the first item of the agenda, Re- 
port of Investment Counsel. Mr. Wood said the University port- 



folio had performed relatively well in 1977 in what had been a 
weak market. The performance was due to the fact that the port- 
folio contained a high percentage of traditional growth issues 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



B&F Comm. 
8/31/77 



Report of 
Subcommittee 
on South 
African 
Investments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

rather than cyclical stocks which were subject to market fluctu- 
ations. He noted that his firm did not foresee a major recession 
in the offing, chiefly because the indicators of such a recession 
were not presently visible. Mr. Parker said that in the period 
from April 30th to early July the yield on the portfolio was 5.37 
percent, about 1 percent better than the market as a whole. Mr. 
Wood concluded that they were not making any recommendations for 
changes at this time. 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Report of 
the Subcommittee on South African Investments. Mr. Johnson said 



the Subcommittee on South African Investments had been charged 
with the responsibility to make certain that the University's in- 
vestment policy did not further South African racial policies in 
any way and to assure that its investment policy is being conduct- 
ed in a socially responsible manner. The Subcommittee had met 
five times. A great deal of time and effort had been spent in 
gathering data about the twenty corporations in which the Univer- 
sity had investments and which had business operations in South 
Africa. Each corporation had been queried as to its practices in 
South Africa and each had replied, in greater or lesser detail. 
Copies of the corporate responses and the minutes of the Subcom- 
mittee had previously been distributed to all members of the Com- 
mittee on Budget and Finance. A study of the replies and other 
relevant data had led the Subcommittee to conclude that certain 
corporations were conducting their affairs in South Africa in an 
acceptable manner, three in an unacceptable manner, and others 
would require further study, based on the Trustee investment policjy 
of 197 3. The Subcommittee was recommending that the University 
divest itself of the investments in the three companies deemed to 
be acting in an unacceptable manner, the recommendation was made 
without regard to investment considerations. 

The profit/loss to the University of the proposed di- 
vestment based on market quotations as of August 30 would be: 



No. of 










Profit or 


Shares 


Corporation 
Amax 


Book 
$29,420 


42 


Market 
$40,000.00 


(Loss)* 


1000 


$10,579.58 


1500 


FMC Corporation 


33,373 


72 


36,375.00 


3,001.28 


1600 


Newmont Mining 












Corporation 


47,014 


45 


29,400.00 


(17,614.45) 



$109,808.59 $105,775.00 ($4,033.59) 
*Does not include Broker's Fees 

Trustees Batiste and Dennis agreed that one of the most difficult 
things to determine from some of the replies was whether the 
corporation was making a genuine effort or simply employed some 
very artful writers. There was no further discussion and it was 
moved, seconded and 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
after review of the Endowment Fund invest- 
ments in companies engaged in business in 
South Africa and on the basis of information 
available including corporate responses to 
specific questions the following companies 
do not measure up to the University's Invest- 
ment Policy Guidelines adopted by the Board 
of Trustees on January 31, 1973 and that 
divestment is recommended by the Trustee 
Subcommittee on Investments in South Africa, 
namely : 



B&F Comm. 
8/31/77 



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Amax Inc . 

FMC Corporation 

Newmont Mining Corporation 

It is further recommended that the investments 
in the following companies be retained as hav- 
ing met or exceeded the policy guidelines: 

Caterpillar 
Exxon Corporation 
General Electric Company 
General Motors Corporation 
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company 
Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing 

Company 
Motorola, Inc. 
Southern Company — is not engaged in 

business per se in South Africa 
Xerox Corporation 

It is also recommended that the following 
companies be retained for further review in 
three months by the subcommittee following 
communication to management by the Treasurer 
urging greater affirmative action on their 
part to improve the economic and social con- 
ditions of blacks and coloreds in South 
Africa: 



I 



Eli Lilly 

Honeywell 

IBM 

Johnson & Johnson 

Kodak 

Nabisco 

Pfizer 

Smithkline 

Mr. Johnson said the Subcommittee had further decided 



B&F Comm. 
8/31/77 



UM/ Amherst — 
Authorization 
of Signature 



President ' s 
Comments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to recommend that the Investment Counsel, in making recommenda- 
tions, be mindful of the concerns of the Trustees in these matters 
and it was moved and seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees request 
Investment Counsel to include review of a com- 
pany's activities in South Africa and in other 
nations with apartheid policies for conformance 
with Trustee Investment Policy in all future 
recommendations to the Trustees. 

In response to the Chairman's request, Treasurer Johnson 
agreed to provide information about the brokers' commission fees 
paid by the University. 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Authoriza- 
tion of Signature — UM/Amherst. The Committee was told this was 



I 



a housekeeping matter, thus without discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
James L. McBee , Jr., Vice Chancellor for Adminis- 
tration and Finance, Amherst Campus, in his capac- 
ity as an officer, to sign and execute singly and 
without any co-signature, any and all documents 
and instruments relating to expenditure of funds, 
requests for funds, vouchers, warrants, schedules; 
invoices, certificates and also all documents and 
instruments of every nature and kind as all the 
aforesaid may from time to time be required to be 
drawn or executed under the provisions of MGL 
Chapter 75, Section 8. 

The Chairman then asked the President to speak. Presi- 
dent Wood said he wanted to thank Trustee Crain for agreeing to 
chair the Committee, and he observed that he had served under 
three previous Chairmen and was aware of what an onerous job it 
was. 

The unusually full agenda of this meeting, the President 
continued, reflected new schedule of the state budget process. 
Following Board action in September, the budget will be submitted 
to the Executive Branch. Hearings on the FY79 budget requests 
will be held in late September: the University Administration 
and the Boston Campus requests on September 26 at the Massachu- 
setts Bay Community College; the Amherst Campus request on Sep- 
tember 27 at Westfield State; and the Worcester request in Boston 
on September 30. 

There was good news from the preliminary end of year 
report from the University Hospital, President Wood said; the 
Hospital was beginning to realize the benefits of expansion and 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the consequent economies of scale — net revenues in FY77 were 
$8.28 million, of which $5.86 million was collected in cash. 
Expenditures totalled $10.34 million, thus the net cost of the 
hospital in FY77 was $3,545 million, marginally above the FY76 
cost of $3,492 million. Also, the backlog of accounts receivable 
had been cleared up and the patient accounting office was working 
well. Finally, he noted that in FY78 the Trustees and appropriate 
state officials will receive monthly reports on the Hospital Trust 
Fund. 

The President then turned to the FY78 Operating Budget. 
He said the FY78 Budget totalled $201 million from all funds, 
an increase of 11 percent over FY77. State funds account for 
$109 million of the total; other funds come to $92 million. The 
budget is based on the request approved by the Trustees at the 
October 6, 1976 meeting and on guidelines which had been reviewed 
at the June, 197 7 Budget and Finance meeting; and is based on a 
student body of 29,864 FTE and 7,000+ employees. The principal 
increases are in personnel accounts; that is, the annualization 
of the FY77 salary increases and the filling of vacancies, the 
latter in line with the plan to bring vacancy rates down to about 
10 percent of all positions. 

The budget request for FY79 is based on Trustee mandates 
concerning enrollment; it assumes 30,720 FTE students and proposes 
65 new positions at Boston and Worcester, and the restoration of 
27 positions at Amherst. The increases requested reflected, 
again, inflation and annualization of salary increases. 

He concluded by noting that both the FY78 budget and 
FY79 requests emphasize three items: the need for common services 
to continue to expand in order to serve the University on a pro- 
fessional basis; the continuation of program allocations at the 
school and college level; and further development of administra- 
tive justifications. 



The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Fee-Based 
Budgets — UM/Amherst/Boston/Worcester . The Committee was reminded 
that the fees within the budgets had been dealt with by the Board 
at its May 4, 1977 meeting. Ms. Hanson said that the Amherst 
document was now revised with the corrections and suggestions for 
changes in format made by the Committee at their last meeting. 



In the discussion that followed, Trustee Batiste noted 
that there was an item in the Amherst Fine Arts Council budget 
which provided a subsidy for students buying tickets for various 
events. The money for this subsidy was to be transferred event 
by event, and over the course of the year it could not exceed 
$70,000. She also noted that the budget contained requests for 
positions which had been student jobs in the past. Ms. Hanson 
said this was a problem area which was recognized by the finan- 
cial aid and student employment offices. She said that many stu- 



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B&F Comm. 
8/31/77 



Fee-Based 
Budgets 



UM/ Amherst — 

Fee-based 

Budget 

(Doc. T77-078A) 



B&F Comm. 
8/31/77 



UM/Boston — 

Fee-based 

Budget 

(Doc. T78-012) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

dent jobs are related to the work-study program and the University 
must be careful to comply with Federal regulations. One of these 
dictates that the funds should not be used to replace permanent 
salaried positions. 

Trustee Batiste then raised a question about the Campus 
Center, the removal of the garage from the budget of the Center 
and the debt service on the garage. Mr. Beatty said the campus 
had a plan which spoke to this question, and this would be present 
ed to the Committee in October or November. In this context, 
Chairman Crain asked for an explanation of a loan item of $100,000 
This led to an extended discussion as to the history of the loan, 
and the current status of the original source of the loan (the 
Student Room Deposit Fund which was abolished last year) and the 
manner in which the indebtedness was transferred to the Parking 
and Transportation fund account. It was noted that the room 
deposits had been returned to the students with interest; however, 
it was unclear if anything further was due to be returned to the 
dormitory system. Chairman Crain asked if it would be possible 
to have a report on the amount of money now in the fund and a rec- 
ommendation for its disbursal. Treasurer Johnson said this would 
be provided. In response to Trustee Batiste's question, Mr. 
Beatty agreed to provide a report on the Athletic Trust Fund. 

In response to a question from the Chairman, Mr. Beatty 
said that the enrollment estimates in the fee-based document were 
proving accurate. While the pool of applicants had decreased, 
the number of applicants who accepted had increased appreciably 
(from 37 to 46 percent). The decrease in applicants was due in 
part to the imposition of an application fee; while the increase 
in acceptances was due to early delivery of financial aid notices 
There was no further discussion and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the FY 1978 Revenue-based Budget, University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst (Doc. T77-078A) . 

The meeting then turned to the budget of the Boston 
Campus. In response to Trustee Dennis' question, Mr. Tubbs said 
that the Day Care Center at Boston offered a quality program 
which was in demand. In FY77 there were 69 children in attendance 
30 additional children were expected in FY78. Much of the rela- 
tively high cost of day care ($39.00 per week) was paid for 
through contracts with the Department of Welfare. Trustee Dennis 
asked for some elaboration on the Parking and Transportation 
Trust Fund, particularly the item, "Transportation Services Cost" 
of $243,000. President Wood said that part of the effort in es- 
tablishing the Harbor Campus had been to provide a shuttle serv- 
ice between the Columbia stop on the MBTA and the campus. Hudson 
Bus Lines had made the lowest of the many bids received, and the 
contract had been renewed year after year. Fees from the parking 
garage paid for the free bus service. Consideration had been 



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B&F Comm. 
8/31/77 



UM/Worcester — 

Fee-based 

Budget 

(Doc. T77-087) 



Budget 

(Doc. T77-128) 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

given to providing service to the housing project, but this was 
still a possible future development. Chancellor Bromery added a 
cautionary note to the effect that the bus service at Boston and 
that at Amherst was not "free", but it was a "no fare" service. 
There was no further discussion and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the FY 1978 Fee-based Budget, University of 
Massachusetts at Boston (Doc. T78-012). 

Chairman Crain then called for discussion on the 
Worcester Fee-based Budget. There was none and it was moved and 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the FY 1978 Fee-based Budget, University of 
Massachusetts at Worcester (Doc. T77-087) . 



The meeting then turned to the agenda item, FY78 Operaj- FY 1978 
ing Budget . Ms. Hanson said she would speak to the highlights of] Operating 
the Operating Budget, including the centrally allocated resources 
Mr. Donahue would then describe the operations of the Institute 
for Governmental Services; the campus representatives would then 
discuss their portions of the budget. 

Included in the centrally allocated resources, she con- 
tinued , were student financial aid in the form of State Scholar- 
ships in the amount of $1.35 million, an 8 percent ($100,000) in- 
crease over FY7 7. These funds will be used in direct scholarships 
and as matching funds for federal work study monies, in accord 
with state and federal guidelines. The funds are allocated to 
each of the three campuses on the basis of size and need. The al-' 
locations are reviewed quarterly and, where necessary, adjustments; 
are made to insure optimal use of the funds. This arrangement 
works to the satisfaction of all. State Aid to Disadvantaged 
Students, the FY78 appropriation of $700,000 being unchanged 
from that of FY77, is applicable only to Boston and Amherst. 

Trustee Dennis asked if the scholarships were basically 
meeting the needs of the students and was told this was essential-' 
ly so due to the large increases in federal aid funds over the 
past several years. 

Ms. Hanson said that in addition to an overall increase 
in federal funds the allowance for administrative overhead costs 
had been increased from 3 to 4 percent. She noted that the guide J 
lines for the use of such federal funds were increasingly strin- 
gent. 

Trust Fund interest, Ms. Hanson continued, is the one 
major source of unrestricted non-state funds available to the Uni 
versity and over the past several years the amount of money avail-' 



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able from this source has declined, she said. Any funds received 
in excess of the estimated amount would be held in the Trustee 
Reserves. Ms. Hanson pointed out that $45,000 of the Trustee 
Reserves had been allocated for transition purposes — $25,000 for 
the Presidential Search Committee and $20,000 for moving the 
central office to a new location. The amounts allocated were 
based on recent Trustee discussions and were subject to revision 
later in the year if this were indicated necessary. 

Chairman Crain said two points should be clarified — one 
was that he had been asked to comment when the President's Office 
budget was being structured and had agreed that the budget should 
continue to be much as it had been in the past and that certain 
vacancies should not be filled until such time as a new President 
had been chosen. The other point was the soon-to-be-completed 
deliberations of the ad hoc Audit Committee chaired by Trustee 
Dennis and the Committee's recommendations could have impact on 
the budget. 

The meeting then heard a report from Mr. Donahue on the 
Institute for Governmental Services regarding the FY78 budget and 
the FY79 request of the Institute, its activities and other, non- 
state, sources of funding. Mr. Donahue said the Institute had bedn 
created by the Trustees and the President to serve as a link be- 
tween the University and all levels of government — federal, state 
and local. The Institute provides its services through training 
programs, publications, conferences, research and technical as- 
sistance. 

As an example, the Institute's training program for 
local government officials had been ongoing for six years. Funds 
for the programs come from state Interpersonnel Act grants of 
$100,000 per year which had been renewed each year. Over 18,000 
local government officials and employees have taken part in the 
programs that have ranged from two-hour seminars to 100-hour man- 
agement level courses for mayors, selectmen and two managers. 
In these programs, efforts are made to utilize the know-how of 
practitioners in the field in structuring and presenting the 
courses. For example, the First National Bank supplied the in- 
struction and expertise for 30 hours of the 100-hour management 
course offered recently in Boston. 



This same philosophy was carried over into the many 
training manuals issued by the Institute. A recently issued 
manual for tax collectors had been compiled with the help of 
practicing tax collectors. A forthcoming manual for town auditors 
and accountants was being completed in like fashion. Publications^ 
of more general interest included the recently issued "Children's 
Puzzle," an in-depth survey of the problems of children in the 
Commonwealth, and legislative action is expected on a number of 
the recommendations included in that report. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Institute, Mr. Donahue, said, at times acted as a 
broker between funding agencies and the professional schools. 
For example, the Institute received a grant of $750,000 from the 
Department of Public Works, which was turned over to the School of 
Engineering for the actual delivery of services. 

Currently, Mr. Donahue continued, the most important 
activities include a study of occupational and vocational educa- 
tion throughout the state and a recently completed conference 
for nutrition directors involved with the elderly. Lastly, the 
Institute, working with the President's Office is negotiating 
with the Department of Public Welfare to receive a federal grant 
under Title 20 of the Social Security Act in order to develop a 
comprehensive course for Social Service personnel throughout the 
state. The grant, if forthcoming, would be the largest ever re- 
ceived by the Institute — between $3 and $4 million in the first 
year. 

Mr. Donahue said the Trustees may have been concerned 
by the increase in the permanent salary account in the budget 
request for FY79. At present only three positions are part of 
the regular state budget. The 18.5 positions requested are cur- 
rently funded by "soft" money, subject to the vagaries of grant- 
ing agencies or, in at least one case, subject to the largesse of 
another division of the University. 

The past performance of the Institute, Mr. Donahue 
stressed, had justified its existence. The staff was dedicated 
and professional and the requested shift to the regular budget 
would recognize this fact and would enable the Institute to ex- 
pand its programs by devoting more efforts to grant solicitation. 
President Wood pointed out that the Institute, given a core staff, 
could operate as an instrument and contact point for the entire 
University. Trustee Marks said he could understand the desire to 
shift the operation to hard money but wondered if this would les- 
sen the incentive to seek grant money. Mr. Donahue assured him 
that this would not happen. 

Further discussion elicited the information that the 
salaries paid by the Institute were comparable with those of the 
University as a whole and that if the staff were shifted to the 
regular budget any excess "soft" money would be used for program 
expansion. It was suggested that the Institute's operation should 
be examined in the context of continuing education as a whole. 
Chairman Crain thanked Mr. Donahue for his presentation. 

The meeting then returned to the general discussion of 
the FY78 Operating Budget. The Common Services budget, Ms. Hanson 
said, showed an increase for all campuses in terms of dollars; 
however, the percentage of the total allocation assigned to each 
campus had been adjusted to reflect more closely the actual use 
of the services by each campus. Part of the increase in the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Worcester allocation was in anticipation of that campus's greater 
use of common services occasioned by the new Hospital Trust Fund 
and the growth of the Medical Center as a whole. Chairman Crain 
said he wanted to clarify one thing — there was an inconsistency 
in the document in that the total budget as shown was not support 
ed in the addition of the campus budget sections because the full 
amount assigned to Amherst was not reflected in these tables. 
President Wood said that the matter was being resolved administra- 
tively. Trustee Dennis said he was interested in the auditing 
section of the Common Services operation, particularly in view of 
the establishment of the Trustees' ad hoc Auditing Committee, and 
that this was an area that would have to be explored fully. 

Chairman Crain said he viewed auditing as a good manage- 1 
ment tool which contributed to the efficient operation of the 
organization. He urged that the Auditing Committee not be seen 
as a fifth column. Trustee Dennis noted that in the past auditing 
had been a campus responsibility; in his own mind this was now 
becoming a Board function. He said that some thought would have 
to be given to how these audits would be paid for. Chancellor 
Bromery asked if the Trustees would, for example, hire the audit- 
ors. Trustee Dennis said he was not sure if this would be done. 
President Wood said in his view the Audit Committee would deter- 
mine the scope and priority of audits, but the actual conduct of 
the audits would be a matter of campus management. Chancellor 
Bromery said he assumed that the Trustee Audit Committee would 
have the same scope as the audit committee of a corporation. 
Trustee Dennis said the many details of the proposed committee 
would have to be worked out after consultations with the campus- 
es and then presented to the Board for approval. 

In the matter of the President's Office budget, Ms. 
Hanson noted that the FY78 budget was lower than that of FY77; 
this because of a reduced state appropriation and because of 
reduced trust funds. The state fund shortfall was partially met 
by an increase in the monies from Trust Fund interest and by not 
budgeting for replacements for a number of vacancies in the cen- 
tral office. In answer to Trustee Dennis' question she explained 
that the rental (16) account expenses will come from two sources— 1 
rental of One Washington Mall for three months ($36,000) and 
rental of the Xerox and other office machines from state funds; 
month to month rental of One Washington Mall was budgeted from 
the remainder of the Trust Funds. The net increase over FY77 in 
the amount allocated from Trust Fund Interest was $30,000; this 
because, as had been noted, funds to fill senior staff vacancies 
had not been budgeted. President Wood said that recruiting senior 
staff in a transition period was not desirable, either from the 
point of view of the new president or from that of candidates for 
the senior positions. If, in his opinion, these vacancies seri- 
ously impaired the functioning of the central office he would so 
inform the Board. 



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Trustee Dennis said he was disturbed to realize that 
the Secretary's position and those of other senior staff had not 
been budgeted. Trustee Marks said he felt any relationship be- 
tween space and personnel was more apparent than real. Assuming 
the worst possible case, the entire $114,000 of trust funds would 
be used as rent for One Washington Mall. If, as seemed possible, 
a relatively rapid move to 100 Arlington was made, some of those 
funds would be saved for other expenses. Trustee Dennis said 
there were several serious policy considerations being discussed. 
Firstly, the President's statement that he would let the Board 
know if he felt the function of the central office was impaired. 
Trustee Dennis said this was the first time he had been aware of 
this. Secondly, while he was aware that Trust Fund interest might 
be used to pay rent for the central office, he did not know that 
this could amount to $114,000. President Wood said that these 
were contingency plans and that, given the seeming consensus that 
100 Arlington would be the location of the central office, the 
entire picture could change in six months. He restated his opin- 
ion that the incoming president should have a free hand in the 
matter of senior staff. In the matter of the Secretary, Chairman 
Crain said, the Board might say that the Secretary is going to 
[work for the Board and may proceed to hire a person for the posi- 
tion. 

The meeting then discussed the FY78 Operating Budget 
for Amherst. Chancellor Bromery said that while the FY78 appro- 
priation appeared to be substantially greater than that of FY77, 
salary annualizations and other factors meant that the net in- 
crease was about $1.8 million. It was not generally recognized, 
but the Amherst campus maintained the same enrollment at present 
as it had in FY75; if the campus were to return to that year's 
level of staffing, a net increase of $5 million would be needed. 

In anticipation of a budget increase some faculty 
vacancies had been filled in May (the normal academic hiring 
period), as filling faculty vacancies had been the first priority. 
The second priority had been Student Support Services, which had 
been severely cut in 1976. Efforts were underway to strengthen 
staff in these services; particularly in financial aid, housing 
and placement. Hardest hit of all divisions at Amherst had been 
Administration and Finance. There were still numerous vacancies. 
The physical plant was not being maintained at an adequate level 
and inventories of supplies were non-existent. He stressed that 
this was a matter which was of concern, as there was a multi mil- 
lion dollar campus at stake. 

Provost Puryear said that in the effort to fill as many 
faculty positions as possible, the budget had been realigned to 
facilitate this effort and available new money had been employed. 
The positions filled were mainly in the School of Business Admin- 
istration and the College of Food and Natural Resources, and in 
the area of fine arts, where efforts were being made to build a 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

more stable base for the Fine Arts Center. Also, funding for the 
freshmen programs had been rationalized. In September, Amherst 
would enroll the largest freshmen class ever and additional funds 
would be allocated to the Rhetoric Program. The $68,000 figure 
in the budget was subject to an upward revision in the range of 
$40,000, as that program already had a large backlog of appli- 
cants . 

Additional money was being allocated to University Ex- 
tension, Mr. Puryear continued. Administrative costs of the Ex- 
tension Service were now part of the state budget; therefore, the 
University now distinguished educational costs of the programs 
from administrative ones. Other allocations were $100,000 for 
equity adjustments and $50,000 to establish an Office of Energy 
Affairs; this was seen as part of the University's growing re- 
sponsibilities to the Commonwealth. 

In response to Trustee Marks' question, Mr. Puryear 
said that the administrative costs for the Extension Service now 
assigned to the state budget amounted to $127,000. The funds 
would be used for the expansion and development of the extension 
program. Since the University had a particular legislative 
mandate to provide extension service, administrative costs of the 
service were not added to the program costs. 

In response to a question about the campus' meeting 
the Trustees' mandate regarding the student "mix," Mr. Beatty 
said the prescribed ratio of graduates to undergraduates would 
be met, but the situation as regards lower/upper level among under 
graduates was not clear. Chancellor Bromery said this was partly 
due to the size of the freshman class and that this would be a 
transition year, as failing grades would once again be counted in 
calculating the student's cumulative average. However, it was 
expected that the mandated ratio would be met or approximated. 

In response to Trustee Troy's question, Mr. Puryear 
said the reduction of $131,000 in the allocation for the Faculty 
of Natural Sciences and Mathematics was not a reallocation. It 
was felt that the Faculty could make a short-term adjustment more 
easily than other units and that reductions had to be made some- 
where in order to meet certain University-wide needs. Trustee 
Troy recalled that at a Faculty and Educational Policy meeting 
which discussed reallocations, Dean Shapiro had said the Faculty 
of Natural Sciences and Mathematics had said they expected an 
increase in student demand; this contradicted data supplied by 
the Provost's Office. He asked if this disagreement had been 
resolved. Mr. Puryear said he had discussed the matter with Dean 
Shapiro and there was still no agreement; however, this had to 
do with differing analyses rather than different data. Trustee 
Troy said that, as Chairman of Faculty and Educational Policy, he 
wanted to be assured that faculty, particularly the deans, were 
being consulted and did have input in these matters. Mr. Puryear 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

said he had met with Dean Shapiro and had offered to meet with 
the faculty. 

The meeting then discussed Student Affairs at Amherst. 
Mr. Woodbury said that the area was now getting back to the capac- 
ities it had two years ago. The Financial Aid and Placement Of- 
fices had been the most critical problems. Financial Aid was now 
less understaffed than it had been and a major infusion of funds 
was contemplated for Placement. In the Counseling area, salary 
adjustments were to be made for the Resident Assistants who 
served as counselors in the dormitories. The increase from 
$14,000 to $70,000 for the Handicapped Student Affairs Office was 
just the beginning of what boded to become a major concern of the 
campus, if only to meet the various state and federal mandates 
regarding architectural barriers. Some vacancies in Admissions 
and Records had been filled and the Transfer Affairs Office would 
become increasingly important, as its responsibilities had been 
broadened to include dealing with all non-traditional students. 
Chairman Crain said he was having difficulty reconciling the ad- 
ministrative services increases. One would assume that what was 
proposed for Common Services might well result in reductions on 
campus. These reductions he did not see. Mr. Woodbury said this 
was a case of needing increases for both ends. For example, in 
the area of financial aid, not only was volume of such aid great- 
ly increased, but changes in the law required much more sophisti- 
cated data processing and retrieval. In effect, the campus was 
faced with a change in product and a change in demand. 

The meeting then discussed Administration and Finance. 
Mr. McBee said that, as had been noted, he represented the area 
that had been hit hardest by the budgetary crisis. The small 
net increase available in the FY78 budget would be used to fill 
twenty custodial, one clerical and six professional positions in 
the physical plant area. That this was an inadequate response to 
the actual situation could be understood when one realized that 
buildings which in 1974 were staffed with eight custodians would, 
in FY78, be staffed with 2.5. The point to be made, Mr. McBee 
said, was that the buildings were not being properly maintained 
and the situation would soon become critical. In addition, some 
positions in the financial and personnel areas were being filled 
in an attempt to restore needed services. The remaining funds 
would be used to build up supplies inventories. Mr. McBee con- 
cluded by noting that staff morale in his area was very low; this 
because people were being asked to do much more with much less. 

At 1:05 p.m., the Chairman suggested the meeting break 
for lunch. 

The meeting resumed at 1:20 p.m. The Chairman said it 
would be necessary to adjourn shortly. The Committee agreed to 
meet at 9:00 a.m. on September 14, the day of the Board meeting, 
if necessary. The meeting then turned to the agenda item, FY78 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Operating Budget — UM/Boston. Mr. Steamer said that the net in- 
crease for FY78, $200,000, was small but had been of considerable 
help. The bulk of the increase had been allotted to the academic 
affairs area. The College of Arts and Sciences had been kept at 
roughly the same size; this was in line with the request of the 
College and the recommendations of the Faculty and Educational 
Policy Committee. The College of Professional Studies' allocation 
would allow for the addition of seven new faculty positions; that 
of the College of Public and Community Services would fund two 
new positions. The Deans seemed to be reasonably satisfied. 

As was known, Mr. Steamer continued, this was a transi- 
tional year as the Campus was undergoing an intensive and extensive 
self-study. It was hoped that in FY79, a considerable reallocation 
of resources among the Colleges and within the College of Arts anc 
Sciences would be possible. The University was still trying to 
move toward the mandated ratio of upper/lower division of stu- 
dents. The effort had yet to be successful. However, a Director 
of Admissions had been hired and one person now devoted full time 
to working with transfer students and the community colleges, so 
the situation was expected to improve. The extended day program 
still presented problems, chiefly because of faculty reluctance 
to offer courses in the late afternoon and evening. In FY78 about 
10 percent more courses would be offered in the program than in 
FY77 and a considerable improvement was expected in FY79. Over- 
all, Mr. Steamer concluded the Campus was doing reasonably well. 

Speaking of Student Support Services, Mr. Tubbs said 
that the area was still in the process of development. In line 
with the recommendations of the Gage Report, three new positions 
would be added to the Counseling staff — a Director of the 
University-wide Counseling Center and two staff counselors. 
Staff support in the financial aid area would also be increased. 
In addition to the $47,000 increase in the counseling area, ef- 
forts to improve the delivery of such services would continue. 

The meeting then discussed Administration and Finance. 
Mr. Baxter said the area as a whole was being examined. The con- 
tinuing problem was that 50 percent of the vacancies in the Uni- 
versity were Administration and Finance positions. Of these, 
eight were critical and it was hoped that these could be filled. 
In the matter of the physical plant, the policy of decreasing 
contract costs for cleaning and security was continuing. The 
campus' successful energy conservation program was continuing. 
In FY77, a saving of about $500,000 was realized. Unfortunately, 
the program's continuing success was dependent on the continued 
operation of the utility company's nuclear power generator. When 
the company used fossil fuel, the University's electric bill in- 
creased by $12,000 per week. 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item FY78 Operat- 
ing Budget — UM/Worcester . Mr. Campbell said the campus was still 



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suffering growing pains. There were many cost centers within 
the Medical Center and each was kept under close scrutiny. Also 
the deployment of personnel was being "re-reviewed" in order to 
locate further areas of cost saving. The $1.2 million increase 
in the appropriation was to be used mainly to strengthen the fac- 
ulty. As of September 1, the Medical School faculty numbered 
150. Further faculty increases would be in the clinical areas; 
the basic science faculty was basically completed. The School 
also planned additional outreach programs in the areas of physicikn 
upgrading and allied health. The present situation of the School 
was a fairly good one. 

As was known, Mr. Campbell continued, the Trust Fund 
for the Teaching Hospital had been established with a $3.5 mil- 
lion non-repayable start-up grant from the legislature. To date 
$1.7 million had been deposited in the fund. This was in line 
with predicted receipts. The Hospital had recently opened eight 
new beds, bringing the total up to 93. This created the need 
for new positions, but these could not be filled until the House 
Ways and Means Committee had issued a list of authorized new 
positions. Trustee Dennis asked about the need to reduce the 
number of beds in the Worcester area. Mr. Campbell pointed out 
that all of the beds in the Teaching Hospital were acute care 
beds and, as such, did not compete with the services offered in 
other Worcester area hospitals. 



There was no further discussion and it was moved, sec- 



onded and 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the FY 1978 Operating Budget for the University 
of Massachusetts as contained in Doc. T77-128. 

Chairman Crain reminded the Committee that the next 
meeting would be on September 14 at 9:00 a.m. in Amherst. 

The meeting adjourned at 1:50 p.m. 



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Dorothy Eicflfiel 

Assistant Secretary to the Board 
of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

September 8, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Shearer, President Wood; 
Trustees Baker, Batiste, Kassler, Romer; Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Anrig, McNeil, Morgenthau and 



Okin 



Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy : Chairman Troy, Trustee 
Burack, Ms. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding, Mr. Colby 
representing Trustee Winthrop 



Other Trustees: Ms. Pinck representing Trustee Dukakis 



Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Ms. Simmons, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs; Ms. Taylor, Assistant Budget Director 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student 



Affairs; Mr. Piedmont, Associate Dean, Graduate School 
UM/Boston: Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Ms 



Van Ummersen, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 10:10 a.m. by Chairmaln 
Shearer. She asked first for a brief overview from each campus of 
the opening day of the fall semester. Mr. Woodbury, Acting 
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs at UM/Amherst, said that this 
year's freshman class was the largest ever. The total undergraduate 
enrollment, he said, was 18,100, about the same as last year. The 
course program has started out reasonably well, but at the moment 
there is a shortage of housing. The overage is currently being 
housed in the Campus Center. Although there are nearly enough bed* 
available, he said, they are in women's dormitories or corridors and 
the students without beds are male students. He said there is 
always a housing problem at the beginning of the year, which is 
usually resolved relatively soon. 

Mr. Colby inquired if the availability of women's beds 
was an indication that women were less interested in attending 
college than previously. Mr. Woodbury replied that he believed 
that limitations in enrollment in the nursing and business 
administration programs were a factor in the smaller enrollment of 
women. The ratio of men to women, he said, was approximately 
54:46. Vice President Lynton said, as a parent of a newly enrolled 



Student Affairs 
9/8/77 



Tuition Waiver 
Policies 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

student at UM/Amherst, he had been extraordinarily impressed by 
the way the campus had personalized the admission process. 
Orientation, he said, had been handled in small groups of from 
300 to 400 students. Mr. Woodbury said that a study had been 
made with regard to why students who had been accepted at UM/ Amherfct 
had chosen not to enroll, and it had been found that many did not 
come because of the size of the campus. 

Chairman Shearer asked Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs at UM/Boston, to speak for that campus. Mr. 
Tubbs said that 7200 FTE students were enrolled, 3888 lower-division 
and 3312 upper-division students. Of this number 2176 are new 
students, of which some 1300 are freshmen and over 800 are transfer 
students, the transfer students coming primarily from the community 
college system. There are also some 325 special, non-degree- 
seeking students who are not included in the above figures. The 
ratio of males to females is about 52:48, he said. Geographically 1 , 
40 percent of the students come from Boston, 30 percent from the 
metropolitan Boston area, and 30 percent from surrounding 
communities. The major problem at the beginning of the year at 
UM/Boston, he said, is a parking problem in the garage. In 
response to a query from Trustee Troy, Mr. Tubbs said that of the 
transfer students, 625 were in the College of Arts and Sciences, 
98 were in the College of Public and Community Service and 40 
were in the College of Professional Studies. This year, he said, 
one person will be assigned especially to work with community 
and junior college transfer students. 

Mr. Colby asked if there was a change in the trend for 
students to wish to live off-campus. Mr. Woodbury replied that 
about half of the students chose to live in the residence halls. 
Ms. Romer added that there is a shortage of moderately-priced 
housing in the Amherst area, which may contribute to the trend 
toward on-campus housing. 



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At the conclusion of the overview o 
the college year, Chairman Shearer welcomed t 
members of the Committee on Faculty and Educa 
had been invited to participate in the discus 
of agenda, Tuition Waiver Policies . She then 
Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs 
history of tuition waivers at the University, 
plained that Chapter 75 of the General Laws o 
established the authority of the Trustees to 
tuition. The Appropriation Act of 1976 curta 
by prohibiting waivers to out-of-state underg 
except those specifically excluded. 



f the beginning of 
o the meeting the 
tional Policy, who 
sion on the one item 
asked Ms. Simmons, 
, to review the 

Ms . S immons ex- 
f the Commonwealth 
set and to waive 
iled this authority 
raduate students, 



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Tuition waivers had begun, she said, with a waiver of 
tuition for one foreign student in 1912. Since that time other 
waivers had been granted to twenty-five different categories of 
students from time to time, without the establishment of a specific 
policy. In the 1974-75 academic year a task force had been 



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established to review the types of waivers being granted and to 
make recommendations for a comprehensive tuition waiver policy. 
At that time it had been recommended that certain categories 
of waivers be established and that some waivers be eliminated. 

From the outset, said Ms. Simmons, tuition waivers had 
been granted, not on the basis of need, but in order to attract 
certain types of students in order to further the goals of the 
University, or as a reward to students who were providing a valuable 
service to the University. Only a small number of waivers, she 
said, are granted as a means of financial aid. Some waivers are 
mandated by the Commonwealth, such as those provided to veterans 
and General Court staff members. Veterans receive 26 percent of 
the tuition waived at UM/Amherst and 90 percent of that waived at 
UM/Boston. 



Since the adoption of the recommendations by the task 
force in 1975, tuition waivers have decreased substantially, she 
said. Waivers, at that time were limited to the following 
categories: 1) to Graduate Assistants/Associates; 2) As Financial 
Aid to a. Veterans, b. Fellowship Recipients, c. Foreign Students 
(negated by Statute for undergraduates), and d. Financial Aid 
Recipients (in-state only per Statute); 3) As a Courtesy to a. 
Students of other New England state colleges and universities 
under Reciprocal Agreements, b. Faculty of State and Community 
Colleges, c. University Faculty, Staff and Other Classified 
Employees, d. Recipients of General Court Fellowships, and 
e. Others from time to time mandated by the Commonwealth. 
However, at the time the trustees had last authorized an increase 
in tuition, a new type of waiver based on need had been instituted 
to alleviate the effect of the tuition increase on students and 
to assist, particularly, medical students who already had a high 
level of indebtedness. 

Ms. Pinck asked for clarification that students with 
financial need were provided for by means of grants, loans and 
jobs to the extent of their need. She was assured that their 
need was met by some combination of the three sources of aid. 

Ms. Simmons said that under consideration at the present 
time was a new category of waiver, waivers for contribution or 
service to the University. These waivers would be provided to 
students who were precluded from taking jobs by the time spent 
performing the service to the University. It was anticipated that 
the recently proposed inter-collegiate athletic tuition waivers 
would fall into this category. In response to an inquiry, the 
status of the proposed athletic tuition waivers was clarified. 
It was noted that Counsel had opined that the vote of the Board 
taken on July 28 to reconsider the matter had been valid and that, 
therefore, the athletic waivers were not authorized at the present 
time. Trustee Burack asked what this decision meant to the 



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9/8/77 



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9/8/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

66 students who had been identified to receive these waivers and 
was informed that they would receive, instead, scholarships from 
the Barber Fund, established for this purpose. The Barber Fund, 
it was noted, was a Trust Fund established from monetary gifts 
from the Alumni. 

Discussion ensued with regard to the award of waivers 
to athletes. It was determined that athletes must meet the same 
entrance requirements as other students and that the waivers were 
a means of attracting good athletes to the campus. It was suggesteji 
that in the regular pool of students the campus would find a 
number of students with athletic potential; however, it was 
mentioned that it would be cruel to expect University of Massachusetts 
teams to compete with other institutions that recruited athletes 
if the University were not allowed to do so. Discussion ensued 
as to whether tuition waivers would go to students already 
receiving athletic scholarships and whether it would be possible 
for someone who really did not need a tuition waiver to obtain 
one. It was suggested that the considerations should be: first, 
the needs of the University; second, the appropriate means for 
attracting students to fill those needs; third, if this means 
should be waivers, then whether the waivers should be based on 
the need of the student; and last, what limitations should be 
set for the award of waivers. The point was also made that 
good athletic teams tended to bring recognition to an institution, 
which often attracted students to other programs at that institu- 
tion. 



It was emphasized that students who participate in 
activities such as competitive sports, music and theater programs 
cannot find additional time in which to hold paying jobs. Since 
Federal requirements for financial aid include the stipulation 
that the student earn a portion of his or her expenses, this puts 
an added burden on the student with financial need. There was 
some feeling that participation in extra activities was voluntary 
and should be viewed as a community service, with no renumeration 
expected, but it was also noted that this would automatically 
exclude most students who had to take jobs in order to stay in 
school. It was agreed that life was not always fair, but that 
the University should make every effort to reduce the amount of 
unfairness where possible. 

Discussion turned to what types of activities should be 
included in the proposed new category of tuition waiver, what 
other means of aid were available, what legal problems were 
involved. Chairman Shearer noted that the types of services 
needed by each campus would vary. It was the consensus that 
before a decision could be made as to whether this new category 
of waiver was desirable, more information about these matters 
was required. Specifically, information was requested with regard 
to the following: 

1. Who are the 66 students identified for athletic 

tuition waivers? How many males? How many females? 



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UNIVERSITY OF 



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What activities 



What is their financial need? 
are involved? 



2. What money is currently available for this purpose? 

3. What are other similar institutions doing in this 
regard? Do they have non-athletic tuition waivers 
and scholarships? 

4. What other categories of service are to be con- 
sidered and what are the problems involved with 
each? 

5. Can the waivers be terminated if for any reason the 
student decided not to continue to participate in 
the activity? 

6. Are incoming students to be included in the waiver 
pool; that is, are students to be recruited for 
certain activities? 

Trustee Romer asked for a description of the criteria 
for determining need and for the development of some alternative 
statements. Ms. Pinck said that the Committee should be aware 
that Massachusetts appropriations for financial aid are small in 
comparison with other states. 

President Wood said that he thought the Committee shoulc 
understand that the intercollegiate athletic program at the University 
had been a problem of seven years' standing, and that athletic 
schedules were determined four years in advance. Therefore, if 
the University was to maintain its athletic programs, it was 
necessary for the teams to be competitive. Mr. Colby commented 
that he was surprised it had taken so long for a tuition waiver 
policy to be established: It was pointed out to Mr. Colby that 
a comprehensive policy had been established after the task force 
report in 1975, by the Trustees in that year. The necessity to 
continue this discussion was acknowledged and it was agreed to 
meet again in September after the time of the Board meeting. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 12:15 p.m. 



Dorothy E^chel 

Assistant Secretary to the Board 
of Trustees 



Student Affairs 
9/8/77 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS 

September 12, 1977; 12:30 p.m. 
Room SF1-4 
Medical Science Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

ATTENDANCE: | Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Robertson; Trustees 
McNeil and McNulty; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Fielding, Gordon, Okin and 
Shearer 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Ms. Veith, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger 



The meeting came to order at 12:55 p.m. Chairman 
Robertson introduced Ms. Veith, who, he said, would henceforth 
serve as the Committee's liaison with the President's Office. 
The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Classification of 
Position Title, Associate Vice Chancellor for Community Relations 
Development and Planning — UM/Worcester (Doc. T78-015) . Chairman 
Robertson noted that this position had been proposed at the last 
Board meeting at which time a number of serious and legitimate 
questions had been raised. At the meeting the proposal had, in 
effect, been tabled. He said that he had met recently with Chan- 
cellor Bulger and Vice Chancellor Campbell and they had discussed 
all aspects of the proposed position, including the possibility 
of withdrawing the proposal. After an extended discussion, the 
decision had been made to bring the proposal back to the Board. 
There were a number of reasons for this decision. First, the 
need for the position was apparent. The duties of the Associate 
Vice Chancellor were now either being ignored or met on an ad hoc| 
crisis basis by already overburdened administrators. The person 
proposed for the position was very highly qualified. Chairman 
Robertson said he had yet to hear anything negative about the 
person's qualifications, initiative, dedication or performance. 
Finally, an aspect which the Chairman said would not be an issue 
if the position was not needed or if the candidate was unqualified 
the appointment would be in line with affirmative action guide- 
lines. He noted that the proposed salary was overscale and it 
was for this reason that the matter had to have Board approval. 
He concluded by saying that the situation at Worcester required 
a highly qualified person who could deal with officials at all 
levels. The proposed candidate answered these requirements. 

Chancellor Bulger said that the responsibilities of the 
position as outlined in the document at hand were in areas where 
what was now being done was inadequate or on a random basis. 



UM/Worcester — 
Classification 
of Position 
Title- 
Associate Vice 
Chancellor for 
Community 
Relations , 
Development and 
Planning 
(Doc. T78-015) 



Health Affairs 
9/12/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Also, all were responsibilities that should be done in a consistent 
and coordinated way. One question that had been raised, the Chan- 
cellor continued, was why these needs had not been met before. 
He noted that at the time of his appointment it had been generally 
acknowledged that the Medical Center was woefully underadminister- 
ed. Since that time, positions had been filled as crises and op- 
portunities arose and the availability of the candidate for the 
Associate Vice Chancellor's position was such an opportunity. 

Trustee McNeil asked why the position was not at the 
Vice Chancellor's level. Chancellor Bulger said that the organi- 
zation of the Medical Center included only three Vice Chancellors 
He noted that this matter had been discussed with the candidate. 
The Associate Vice Chancellor would report directly to the Chan- 
cellor and would work with the Vice Chancellors. 

Trustee McNulty asked if the position had been advertised, 
Chancellor Bulger said this had not been done because of time con- 
straints. The candidate was seeking a position and his hiring 
was seen as a "target of opportunity." Chairman Robertson said 
that in hiring in industry, it occasionally happened that a highly 
qualified person became available and was hired without going 
through the normal routines. He noted that when the position had 
been discussed by the Board, the health planning aspect of the 
position had been unduly emphasized. The role of the Associate 
Vice Chancellor in the planning process would be that of coordinat- 
ing and orchestrating the planning proposals devised by all the 
Medical Center units. The planning process required some high 
level legwork, much of which was now done by the Chancellor. This 
would now be done by the Associate Vice Chancellor. Chancellor 
Bulger said the candidate had been deeply involved in planning 
for a number of health-related activities. Additionally, he woulc. 
be involved in the Medical Center's efforts to upgrade the manage- 
ment skills of women; to evaluate certain departments; and to ad- 
dress the problems raised by the lack of middle management capa- 
bility in certain clinical departments. 

Chairman Robertson said that Worcester could probably 
recruit a less experienced person for the position at a lower 
salary; however, the need was for a proven person who could im- 
mediately act on pressing issues, such as relations with the 
Worcester City Hospital. 



There was no further discussion, and it was moved, sec- 



onded and 



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VOTED : To recommend to the Executive Committee approval 
of the Classification of Position Title as 
detailed in Trustee Doc. T78-015. 

Trustee McNeil asked if it would be possible to receive 
an up-to-date report on the affirmative action at the Medical 



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Center. Chancellor Bulger said an oral report would be made to 
the Committee at its next meeting, with needed elaboration to 
follow. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit^ 
tee, and the meeting was adjourned at 1:45 p.m. 



A** 



Dorothy Efihel 

Assistant Secretary to the Board 
of Trustees 




Health Affairs 
9/12/77 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

September 14, 1977; 9:00 a.m. 
Board Room, Third Floor 
Whitmore Administration Building 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Crain; President Wood; 
Trustees Dennis, Marks and Troy; Treasurer Johnson; Ms. Eichel, 
recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Gordon, Rowland and Spiller 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; 
Mr. Bench, Associate University Counsel; Ms. Hanson, Budget 
Director and Associate Vice President; Mr. Hester, Associate 
Vice President for Business Affairs; Mr. Hogan, University 
Controller 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor 
for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. McBee, Vice Chancellor for 
Administration and Finance; Mr. Beatty, Associate Director of 
the Office of Budget and Institutional Studies 

UM/Boston : Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
and Provost; Mr. Baxter, Vice Chancellor for Administration and 
Finance; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; 
Professors Martin and Schwartz, Faculty Representatives 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor 
for Administration and Finance; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Mr. 
Ference, Group Practice Administrator; Professor Smith, Faculty 
Representative 

The meeting was called to order at 9:20 a.m. by 
Chairman Crain, who said that this meeting was a continuation 
of the meeting held on August 31. He asked if there were any 
questions with regard to discussions of the previous meeting. 
Trustee Troy stated his concern that the FY 1978 Operating 
Budget (Doc. T78-128) indicated that twenty positions in the 
College of Arts and Sciences at Boston had not been filled. 
Provost Steamer said that the student/teacher ratio in this 
college was about the same this year as it had been in the 
previous year. For two years, he said, these positions had not 
been filled. There are 330 permanent positions, he said, and 
additional faculty as required are on loan from other colleges. 
The positions have not been filled pending final long-range 
plans. Professor Schwartz added that the College of Arts and 
Sciences will have responsibility for teaching one-half of the 



FY78 Operating 

Budget 

(Doc. T78-128) 



B&F Comm. 
9/14/77 



FY 1979 

Maintenance 

Budget 

Request 

(Doc. T77-129) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

liberal arts courses for the College of Professional Studies. 
The number of students in the College of Professional Studies 
has increased from 550 to 725, he said. Trustee Troy stated 
his concern over the declining student/teacher ratio at UM/ 
Boston, where he said there was a need for small classes. 
Provost Puryear commented that the ratio at UM/Amherst was 
currently 17:1; however, this was a campus-wide average and 
some classes had ratios of 30:1. Provist Steamer said that 
class size in the College of Arts and Sciences varied from a 
maximum of 30, to a minimum of 23 for elementary English and 
mathematics. 

Chancellor Bromery cautioned that the word 
"administration" be clearly defined, because, he said, people 
such as those working in the financial aid area, were included 
in the category of administrative personnel. Chairman Crain 
commented that there should be an explanation of why, if it 
happens, administrative ratios are decreasing while faculty/ 
student ratios are increasing. Trustee Troy stated his concern 
that the increase in administrative positions was greater than 
that in faculty positions. Professor Schwartz also cautioned 
that the ratio of faculty to students could be made to look 
better by the inclusion of more part-time faculty. Chairman 
Crain said that he hoped that this point would be taken into 
consideration. 

Chairman Crain then turned discussion to the matter of 
the FY 1979 Maintenance Budget Request (Doc. T77-129), and asked 
Ms. Hanson, Budget Director, to open discussion of this matter. 
Ms. Hanson said that the FY 1979 request was for $124.5 million, 
an increase of about 14 percent over the $109.2 million FY 1978 
budget. Ms. Hanson then commented on the University-wide 
appropriations, beginning with the subject of Student Aid. The 
increase of $150,000, to a total of $1.5 million, she said, was 
due to increases in both student demand and in matching federal 
funds. This account was used heavily, she said, for matching 
college work/study federal funds. Level funding for financial 
aid for Disadvantaged Students had been requested, she said, 
because the increases in need in this category of student were 
being met by federal money. With regard to the federal matching 
account for equipment purchases, she said, federal grants had 
been increasing at both UM/Boston and UM/Worcester and the 
federal matching funds ranged from ratios of from 2:1 to 4:1. 
The University appropriation for this account had remained the 
same, she said, for the last six years. 

Ms. Hanson spoke next of the General Court Fellowships, 
indicating that the appropriation for this account was used 
chiefly for running the programs. Trustee Marks inquired who 
took these courses, and Ms. Hanson replied that legislators 
enrolled in the courses and, in addition, University students 
worked as interns in the offices of legislators. The fellowships 
she said, were established by the Legislature and are funded 
according to the will of the Legislature. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

With regard to the budget for the President's Office, 
she said that the principal increase was requested to cover 
full funding by the state for all positions. This would include 
the positions which had previously been partially funded from 
trust funds. It had been requested that all of the 02 positions 
be converted into 01 positions. The total request for the number 
of positions, however, had not increased. Trustee Dennis asked 
why the fixed cost adjustment was so large for the 02 and so 
small for the 01 account. It was explained that the 01 account 
had previously been fully funded, and that this was also the 
result of annualization. Last year there had been a short fall 
in the 02 account of $180,000 and those salaries had been trust 
funded . 

Ms. Hanson explained that the increase in the 03 
account was for contract cleaning in the new quarters for the 
President's Office. The increase in the 08 account was for 
fuel and utilities. The 12 account also contained funds for 
cleaning at the new location. The only provision for rentals 
was for office machinery, such as the Xerox machine. 

Ms. Hanson next commented on the Common Services 
budget. She said this was projected to be the last year of 
substantial increase in this area, as the Common Services were 
reaching full development. President Wood reminded the Committee 
that an explanatory memorandum with regard to this portion of 
the budget had been circulated. Chairman Crain said that as the 
central administration took over these services, there should 
be an indication of savings in this area in the campus budgets 
unless the services were new. He said he saw no evidence of 
this, and he commented that this often happened unless close 
attention was given to ensure that it did not. 

Chairman Crain then asked for comment on the UM/Amherst 
budget. Chancellor Bromery briefly summarized the $81.9 million 
campus budget. He emphasized that in the severe budget crisis 
in FY 1975, the campus had maintained its enrollment at the cost 
of a larger student/faculty ratio. The campus was now trying to 
get back to a lower ratio. The campus was also trying to decrease 
the faculty vacancy rate from 15 percent to 11 percent, with the 
goal of reaching a vacancy rate of 6 percent by FY 1979. 
Traditionally, he said, the vacancy rate had been 3 percent. 
The major thrust of the budget request, he said, was in the 
academic area. In addition to decreasing the vacancy rate, 
the campus needed to increase campus maintenance and acquisitions 
for the library. The inflationary cost for the library, he said, 
was 27 percent a year. The request for additional money would 
not allow the library to catch up, but it would slow down the 
rate of slippage. Student Services, he said, was another area 
of concern. At UM/Amherst, he said, personnel had been moved 
into the positions of greatest need, resulting in a reduction 
in administrative services. Because of the previous position 



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9/14/77 



B&F Comm. 
9/14/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

freeze, this area had suffered from a large number of vacancies. 
Maintenance on the capital investment, he said, had also suffered 
due to the lack of funds in the past few years for supplies and 
personnel to keep the buildings in good repair. 

Trustee Dennis asked what the student/faculty ratio was 
in the area of business administration, to which Provost Puryear 
replied that currently it was 27:1, a figure which did not take 
into account those students who had to be turned away because 
of lack of room in courses. The ratios were even higher in some 
courses, he said. Laboratory work in accounting had had to be 
curtailed because of lack of faculty. If the requested money 
is received, he said, this problem could be resolved in the 
next fiscal year. 

Chairman Crain asked the Chancellor if he felt the 
campus budget was adequate. Chancellor Bromery replied that 
there was a major deficiency in the area of administrative 
services. Chairman Crain mentioned the possibility of obtaining 
funds for building maintenance from the Building Authority. 

In response to a query from Trustee Dennis as to why 
there was an amount budgeted for oil when the coal-fired power 
plant would continue to be in use, Vice Chancellor McBee 
explained that the oil would be used for one oil burner in the 
coal-fired plant and that it was more economical to purchase the 
oil in off seasons and to store it at the Tillson plant. 

Trustee Troy inquired how much of the coastal research 
being done was in response to needs of the Commonwealth and how 
much in search of an ideal. Chancellor Bromery replied that the 
budget reflected a combination of both factors. Provost Puryear 
added that there is external pressure for the University to 
respond to the needs of the Commonwealth and also there is strong 
pressure for the University to become involved in energy research 
Such an investment, he said, would be repaid by money from 
federal resources. President Wood stated that the program at 
Gloucester was one of the most positive developments in the last 
few years . 

Chairman Crain next asked Provost Steamer to comment 
on the UM/Boston budget request. Mr. Steamer said that the 
campus was attempting to carry out the mandate of the Trustees 
by expanding the College of Public and Community Service and 
the College of Professional Studies. The campus, he said, was 
proposing the expanding of the faculties in both colleges. The 
overall faculty/student ratio, he said, was 17.5:1. Responding 
to a question from Professor Schwartz with regard to the College 
of Arts and Sciences taking on management programs, he said there 
would be no additional burden on the liberal arts faculty, with 
a continued enrollment of about 6000. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost Steamer said that the campus was planning to 
make use of any savings achieved in energy costs for increasing 
the number of volumes in the library. Trustee Dennis asked if 
the energy savings was sufficient to meet the needs of the studenjts 
for library books. Provost Steamer said that it was not. Re- 
sponding to a question from Trustee Marks, Mr. Baxter, Vice 
Chancellor for Administration and Finance, explained that although 
the campus can now forecast the consumption of KWH fairly accurat 
ly, energy costs vary greatly depending upon the amount of time 
the nuclear plant is in operation. When the nuclear plant is 
shut down, energy costs go up greatly, he said. Trustee Marks 
asked if the energy savings could not continue to be used for the 
purchase of books, and Ms. Hanson explained that it is not 
anticipated that the campus will be able to continue energy sav- 
ings at the rate previously accomplished. Mr. Baxter said the 
cost to maintain the serials in the library each year approximate 
$100,000, and an equal amount is required to build up the number 
of volumes in the library. 

Chancellor Bromery commented that at UM/ Amherst, the 
problem of library acquisitions had been somewhat alleviated by 
the cooperative effort of the Five-College Consortium. 

Chairman Crain stated his concern with regard to 
capital outlay for the sea-water system at UM/Boston. Mr. 
Baxter said receipt of capital outlay was vital since to try to 
correct a problem of this magnitude through the use of mainte- 
nance budget funds would be disastrous. 

Trustee Dennis inquired why the number of degrees 
anticipated did not approximate one-quarter of the total en- 
rollment. Ms. Robinson replied that this was due to a combina- 
tion of factors, including the attrition rate and the ratio of 
upper to lower division students since the campus was still in a 
state of growth. It was noted that although the goal was for a 
60:40 ratio of upper to lower division students by 1980, the 
ratio at the current time was only about 40:60. This was partly 
due to the fact that the number of transfer students from the 
community college system had not been as great as anticipated. 
It was also noted that some students, especially those who have 
jobs, take five years to complete their credits for degrees. Mr. 
Lynton, Vice President for Academic Affairs, noted that an ad- 
missions report was being prepared for presentation at a future 
joint meeting of the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy 
and the Committee on Student Affairs, and he would see if it 
would be possible to include statistics on the student mix in tha 
report . 

Trustee Dennis asked for an explanation of the increase 
in the graduate programs. Provost Steamer explained that it was 
necessary to increase the number of students in the graduate pro- 
grams in order to reach a critical mass, and this did not repre- 
sent an increase in the number of graduate programs. 



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9/14/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Crain then asked Chancellor Bulger to comment 
on the budget request for the UM/Worcester Medical Center. 
Chancellor Bulger explained that the major increase in the 
Medical School budget was the result of the need to complete the 
clinical faculty. After this priority, he said, came the need 
for library services. The visiting committee had listed these 
as two areas of concern, he said. The requested number of 200 
FTE faculty, he said, was a reasonable figure, but on the low 
side. It could be augmented by adding faculty funded from other 
resources than state funds. With regard to the hospital, he said 
he felt the projected budget would cover theunpaid debts and the 
educational costs. 

Trustee Dennis asked if it was expected that the state 
would continue to subsidize the hospital. Ms. Hanson said that 
she felt the hospital would continue to receive a subsidy from 
the state, but that the level of funding could not be predicted. 
President Wood said that if the trust-fund operation works as 
well as it appears to be doing now, the Legislature would expect 
to fund the educational component. 

Chancellor Bulger commented on some of the cooperative 
programs being initiated which enhance the education of both UM/ 
Worcester students and those from other health service programs. 
Chairman Crain inquired if his understanding that the continuing 
education programs at UM/Worcester were self-supporting was 
correct and was assured that it was. Trustee Dennis asked what 
the impact would be on the Medical School if it were not able to 
initiate some of the requested programs. Chancellor Bulger gave 
as an example a situation which had arisen in the previous year, 
where because of the lack .of money to purchase books for the 
library, individual faculty members had purchased books for the 
use of students. He said there were few middle-management-level 
positions because of the faculty staffing needs. Mr. Campbell, 
Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance, when asked how 
the campus managed under these conditions, replied that the 
current staff worked longer hours and burned more midnight oil, 
but that it was very important that these positions be filled. 

At the conclusion of the UM/Worcester presentation, 
President Wood commented for the information of the Committee 
that there was no money in the FY78 budget to cover future labor 
settlements and that these funds would have to come from special 
appropriations and further that there was no estimate included 
in the FY79 request for any FY79 settlements. 

There was no further discussion and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 



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To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve the 



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FY 1979 Maintenance Budget Request as set 
forth in Doc. T77-129. 

Chairman Crain next asked for a report on the Group 
Practice Plan Trust Fund — UM/Worcester (Doc. T78-013) . 
Chancellor Bulger said the trust fund seemed to be going well. 
Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance, 
said a written report had been circulated and asked if there were 
any specific questions with regard to the report. Ms. Hanson 
recalled that there had been a full report on the trust fund in 
November and another report had been made in late spring. 
Chancellor Bulger added that the revised Group Practice Plan 
specifically stated that there would not be a deficit. The 
current report, he said, reflected the improvement in the collec- 
tion of receivables which had occurred since Mr. Ference had been 
appointed Group Practice Administrator. 

Mr. Cathey, Controller at UM/Worcester , invited 
interested Trustees to attend a seminar to be held in Worcester 
the week of October 3 concerning third-party cost reimbursement. 

Chairman Crain then thanked Ms. Hanson and the campus 
budget office personnel for their help in providing the budget 
data sufficiently in advance so that a thorough review could be 
made by the Committee and urged the Committee members to attend 
the budget hearings if their schedules permitted. 

The meeting adjourned at 10:55 a.m. 



B&F Comm. 
9/14/77 



UM/Worcester — 
Group Practice 
Plan Trust Fund 
(Doc. T78-013) 




Ll^Jul^ 



Dorothy Eidfhel 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

September 14, 1977; 11:00 a.m. 
Memorial Hall 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

Committee and Committee Staff: President Wood; Trustees Crain, 



Robertson and Troy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Chairman Healey; Trustees Clark, 
Gordon, Rowland, Shearer and Spiller 

Other Trustees : Trustees Baker, Batiste, Breyer, Burack, Dennis, 
Kassler, Marks, McNeil and Romer; Mr. Callahan representing 
Trustee Anrig; Mr. Parks representing Trustee Dukakis; Ms. Blue- 
stone representing Trustee Fielding; Mr. Colby representing 
Trustee Winthrop 

Office of the President : Mr. Bench, Associate Counsel; Ms. Hansoif, 
Budget Director and Associate Vice President; Ms. Taylor, Assist- 
ant Director of the Budget; Mr. Weston, Executive Assistant for 
Management and Business Affairs; Mr. White, Director of University 
Relations 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor for Student Affairs; Professor Brogan, Faculty Representa- 
tive 

UM/Boston : Mr. Baxter, Vice Chancellor for Administration and 
Finance; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Professor 
Schwartz, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor 
for Administration and Finance; Professor Smith, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

Guests : Mr. Cronin, UM/Amherst Student; Ms. Pinck, Executive 
Office of Educational Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 11:20 a.m. In the 
absence of Chairman Healey, Trustee Troy took the chair. He said 
the meeting would discuss the agenda item Consideration of the 
Awarding of Honorary Degrees — UM/Boston, and then go into execu- 
tive session to discuss personnel matters. He noted that Chan- 
cellor Golino had informed the President that the University As- 
sembly had adopted a motion for the awarding of honorary degrees 
at Boston. President Wood said the campus was seeking the author- 
ization of the Board in this matter. He noted that in the early 
days at Boston the faculty had considered awarding such degrees 
and had agreed that such actions would be inappropriate. In the 
interim faculty opinion had changed. 



Consideration 
of the Awarding 
of Honorary 
Degrees — 
UM/Boston 



Executive 
9/14/77 



Personnel 
Matters 

Executive 
Session 



Request of 
Committee for 
Liberation of 
Southern Africa 
to speak at 
Board meeting 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Parks asked if it was necessary for both Amherst 
and Boston to award honorary degrees. He noted that only one 
university was involved. Mr. Baxter said that the campus wanted 
its own identity and was trying to erase the image of being the 
"Boston Branch." Trustee Baker agreed with this. There was no 
further discussion and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the Boston campus to present to the Board of 
Trustees lists of candidates for Honorary Degrees 
to be awarded at the UM/Boston Commencement, begin- 
ning in 1978. 

Chairman Troy then asked for a motion to enter executive 
session. At 11:30 a.m., it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To enter executive session. 

At 12:55 p.m., it was moved, seconded and 



VOTED 



To end the executive session, 



Trustee Batiste said the students had asked that a 
spokesperson be allowed to address the full Board at the after- 
noon meeting. It was noted that this matter had been discussed 
with Chairman Healey. Without further discussion, the request 
was granted . 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee and the meeting was adjourned at 12:58 p.m. 



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Dorothy Ei<(pel 

Assistant Secretary to the Board 
of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE: 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF JOINT MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 
AND COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

October 5, 1977; 9:00 a.m. 
Room 308, Administration Building 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committees and Committee Staff: Chairman Crain, Chairman Spiller 



President Wood; Trustees Burack, Dennis, Kassler, Marks, Romer , 
Troy; Mr. Brand, Associate Treasurer; Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustees Clark, Gordon, McNulty, 



Rowland 

Other Trustees: Trustees Baker, Batiste, Shearer; Ms. Pinck re- 



presenting Trustee Dukakis 

Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Planning, Mr. Searson, 
General Counsel; Ms. Hanson, Budget Director and Associate Vice 
President; Mr. Meehan, Consultant to the Planning Office; Mr. 
Hogan, University Controller 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. McBee, Vice Chancellor for 
Administration and Finance; Mr. Beatty, Director of the Office 
of Budget and Institutional Studies; Mr. Littlefield, Planning 
Director; Professor Brogan, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Mr. Prince, Director of Planning; Professor Martin, 
Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor for Administration 
and Finance; Mr. Cathey, Controller 

The meeting was called to order at 9:10 a.m. by Trustee 
Spiller, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 
Chairman Spiller said because of time constraints, he would re- 
order the agenda to take the items first which were most urgent 
in nature. 



Chairman Spiller then asked Ms. Robinson, Vice President; FY 1979 



for Planning, to open discussion of the FY 1979 Capital Outlay 
Request (Doc. T78-019) . Ms. Robinson said that the request had 
been developed in the context of the five-year capital outlay 
plan adopted by the Trustees in 1976. She noted that the FY78 
request was still pending and that it may be necessary to adjust 
the new request depending upon Legislative action. 

The only UM/Amherst items that the University was 
assuming would be funded in FY78, she said, were the funds for 
anti-pollution renovations to the coal-fired plant and planning 
money for renovations to certain state-owned dormitories. 



Capital Outlay 

Request 

(Doc. T78-019) 



B&F Comm. 
B&G Comm. 
10/5/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Spiller reviewed for the newer Trustees the 
history of the trouble which led to the need for the renovations 
to the coal-fired plant rather than the use of the new oil-fired 
plant. Trustee Crain said he had understood there would be a re- 
port on the progress being made with the Bureau of Building Con- 
struction in placing liability for the defects in the steam lines 
of the new plant. Mr. Littlefield said that the BBC was still 
working on the diagnosis of the line damage and a final report 
on this was not yet in. It was expected, he said, in late 
October. It was noted that the FY79 urgent request for UM/ Amherst 
contained $1.5 million for other utility repairs, construction 
funds for renovations to state-owned residence halls and money 
for equipment and landscaping. 

Ms. Robinson said that the UM/Boston requests assumed 
FY78 funding of the repairs to the sea-water cooling system, for 
which planning money had already been received, and the replace- 
ment of the Library roof. It now appears, she said, that the 
designer will pay for most or all of the cost of replacing the 
roof; therefore, the University is requesting a wording change 
to allow use of the money in the FY78 request for other repairs 
to the Library. Also, she said, the University is assuming that 
the request for renovating four floors at 100 Arlington Street 
will be funded. The urgent items in the FY79 budget, she said, 
included money for conversion of certain library space on the 
campus for classroom and office use, primarily for College of 
Professional Studies, for the Columbia Station bus terminal, and 
for furnishings and equipment, primarily for the converted space 
and other important areas short-changed at the time of construc- 
tion. 

Another change in the five-year plan, she said, was 
that the request for construction funds for the Arts and Science 
Building had been deferred until FY80. 



Mr. Kassler asked for an explanation of the request to 
convert library space to classroom space at UM/Boston. Mr. Princ^, 
Planning Director for the campus, said that the library space 
was originally planned for an enrollment of 15,000, and the 
science library had been split off from the main library. Since 
that time, enrollment goals had been modified, and it now seemed 
desirable to consolidate the science library and the main 
library and to convert the science library space to classrooms. 
In addition, library space in the two college buildings would 
be affected. Trustee Kassler asked if faculty and students had 
been consulted about the conversion. Mr. Prince said although 
it was not a unanimous choice, it had not been made unilaterally 
and that it was a choice faculty and students must make. Pro- 
fessor Martin remarked that he had thought the renovations would 
be for temporary rather than permanent space and that the space 
would be returned when other space became available. Trustee 
Baker expressed concern about the plans to convert the entire 



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UNIVERSITY OF 



MASSACHUSETTS 

, this was the 



B&F Coram. 
B&G Comm. 
10/5/77 



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library-lounge in Building 020 because, she said 
only function room available for the students. 

With regard to UM/Worcester , Ms. Robinson said that 
the FY79 request assumed that the furnishings and equipment for 
the Medical School and Teaching Hospital, requested as urgent 
for FY78, would be funded, and that the computer would be re- 
quested again in the FY79 budget request. Further furnishings and 
equipment funds for the hospital and school and site improvements 
had been included in the urgent request for FY79. 

Trustee Burack remarked that the state auditor's report 
had been critical of the slowness of collection of receivables, 
which she felt would indicate the urgency of the requested computer 
system. 

Chairman Spiller asked if the Committee would agree to 
submit the request and ask that the Boston campus study further 
how the library and lounge space should be allocated. There was 
agreement on this procedure, and Chairman Spiller then read the 
vote. It was moved, seconded and 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

approve the FY 1979 Capital Outlay Budget 
Requests and Submissions as set forth in 
Trustee Document T78-019. 

Ms. Robinson explained that any items not funded on the FY78 
budget would, of course, have to be resubmitted on the FY79 re- 
quest, and the request modified to include those items. 

At the request of Chairman Spiller, Ms. Robinson ex- 
plained that in response to the September 14 Board vote, ma- 
terial had been prepared for the use of the Trustees in talking 
with the Governor and Legislative leadership to ask for the 
support of funding and special "fast-track" techniques for re- 
novating 100 Arlington Street. 

Trustee Marks asked if there had been some preliminary 
discussion with the Legislative and Executive branches with 
regard to the magnitude and thrust of this request. Ms. Hanson, 
Budget Director, said that these governmental branches were not 
unaware of this request and that, in fact, at the recent budget 
hearing, Secretary Parks had offered to accompany a delegation 
of Trustees who would take the package to the Governor to enlist 
his aid in presenting it to the Legislature so that it could be 
included in the FY78 capital outlay appropriation. 

Chairman Spiller explained that this had been discussed 
at the last meeting of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
and that at that time this procedure had been recommended. 



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Renovation 
Funds for 
100 Arlington 
Street 



B&F Coram. 
B&G Comm. 
10/5/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Kassler said he fully endorsed this procedure, 
but that he was troubled by the reference to a "University center" 
in the support material. He had understood at the Buildings and 
Grounds meeting, he said, that the emphasis would be on the 
moving of the central office, rather than on the long-range plans 
for a University center. He said he was concerned that this re- 
quest would be viewed as only the first phase of a long-range 
costly project. Ms. Robinson replied that the Committee discussioji 
and September Trustee vote spoke to an emphasis on educational 
activities and plans for life-long learning in the context of a 
University center. She said it was important that the Legisla- 
ture see this as an investment in a building for which there is 
a long-range plan. Trustee Burack agreed that she felt it would 
be wrong to expect the Legislature to fund a million-dollar pro- 
ject for a short-term plan. However, she said, she felt it 
important to stress what was necessary on the "fast-track" plan 
and not to emphasize the long-range portion. She also said it was 
important to indicate that these plans would not have an adverse 
effect on the College of Public and Community Service. 



Ms. Pinck said the Office of the Secretary of Education- 
al Affairs would be happy to use its influence to open a spot on 
the Governor's calendar for the Trustee delegation. Trustee 
Spiller thanked her and recalled that at the last Buildings and 
Grounds meeting the Secretary's Office had volunteered to go with 
the Trustees to the Governor to add its support to this request. 

Trustee Kassler suggested that the material be edited 
to change the order of the presentation. 

Chairman Spiller suggested that the Committee recommend 
to the Board of Trustees that a delegation from the Board be 
appointed to take this matter to the Governor, and on motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees ask the 
Chairman to appoint a delegation from the Board 
to meet with the Governor, the Executive Offices, 
and the Legislative leadership to request and 
support immediate funding for the renovation 
of four floors at 100 Arlington Street and the 
relocation of the central administrative offices 
in accordance with the September 14 vote of the 
Board. 

President Wood said that he had discussed a tenancy-at-will 
arrangement with a ninety-day notice clause for the central 
office space at One Washington Mall with Spaulding and Slye, 
at a slightly higher rental fee. He said his intention was to 
sign an agreement to this effect unless someone had an objec- 
tion. None was voiced. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Spiller asked next for a report on the renova- 
tion program for 100 Arlington Street via the "fast-track" 
method. Ms. Robinson said that completion six months after re- 
ceipt of the capital outlay was based on preliminary work being 
performed at the University which would allow the designer to go 
ahead immediately upon award of the contract. She said it was 
hoped that the Committee on Building and Grounds could represent 
the Board on the necessary approvals on this project. 

Chairman Spiller next asked for a Progress Report on 
Current Capital Construction Projects. Mr. Littlefield, Planning 
Director, UM/Amherst, reported that the problem at the Graduate 
Research Center was approaching a resolution. The lighting con- 
tract at the Fine Arts Center was nearing completion and the 
sound contract was ready to be let. There were some security pro- 
blems still to be resolved. Any money remaining after com- 
pletion of this work would be used for equipping the Center. 
The problem of bricks falling from the Library walls, he said, 
seemed to have been corrected. The feasibility study on Goodell 
Building had been completed, and the architect was working on 
preliminary design drawings. It was hoped that construction 
could begin in the spring. The schematic design had been 
approved for the facility at Hodgkins Cove, and it was hoped 
that bidding could be accomplished by fall. 

Mr. Prince, Planning Director at UM/Boston, reported 
that there were four projects that required further attention: 
the Library roof repairs, corrections to the sea-water cooling 
system and to the heating and ventilating system in Building 010. 
and energy conservation modifications. 



The designer had agreed to take liability for the roof 
repairs, but would like to be relieved of any other liability for 
this project. The campus was about ready to release the bidding 
documents for repairs to the sea-water cooling system, he said, 
but the Attorney General's Office had never responded to the lettejr 
from the President's Office asking for the BBC to pursue the ques- 
tion of liability. Chairman Spiller said he felt this complaint 
should be followed up with another communication from the Univer- 
sity to the Attorney General, with copies to Administration and 
Finance and the Governor. The Trustees discussed at some length 
the history of this problem, considering what means seemed most 
likely to result in reimbursement to the Commonwealth for the ex- 
pense incurred as a result of faulty design and construction over 
which the University had no control. Although the Bureau of 
Building Construction had responsibility for construction over- 
sight and for ensuring performance by its contractors, the 
University, he said, had to live with the problems. 

Ms. Pinck said that other state agencies had similar 
problems, although not necessarily of the same scope. 



B&F Comm. 
B&G Comm. 

10/5/77 

Renovation 
Program for 
100 Arlington 
Street 



Progress report 
on Current 
Capital Con- 
struction 
Projects 



-5- 



B&F Comm. 
B&G Comm. 
10/5/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Ms. Robinson said the problem was two-fold: how to 
ensure that the Bureau of Building Construction withheld an 
adequate amount of money from the contractor until the construc- 
tion problems were resolved, and how to get redress for unsatis- 
factory or inferior work. 

It was the sense of the meeting that this matter would 
be pursued with the appropriate state agencies. 

There being no further business, the meeting was ad- 
journed at 10:45 a.m. 



Dorothy EicMel 

Assistant Secretary to the Board 
of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

October 5, 1977; 11:00 a.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Healey; President Wood; 



Trustees Crain, Gordon, Robertson, Shearer, Spiller and Troy; 
Assistant Secretary Eichel, Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustees Clark and Rowland 



Other Trustees: Trustees Baker, Batiste, Breyer, Burack, Kassler. 



Marks, McNeil and Romer; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig 
Mr. Parks representing Trustee Dukakis; Ms. Bluestone representing 
Trustee Fielding; Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop 

Office of the President : Ms. Hanson, Budget Director and 
Associate Vice President; Mr. Hester, Associate Vice President 
for Business Services; Mr. Searson, General Counsel 

UM/Amherst: Chancellor Bromery ; Mr. McBee, Vice Chancellor for 



Administration and Finance; Mr. Beatty, Assistant Director, 
Office of the Budget; Professor Brogan, Faculty Representative 

UM/ Bo st on: Professors Martin and Schwartz, Faculty Representa- 



tives 



UM/Worcester : Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor of Administration 



and Finance 



Guests: Ms. Pinck, Office of Educational Affairs 



The meeting came to order at 11:20 a.m. Chairman 
Healey called for discussion of the agenda item, Extension of 
Review of Hospital By-Laws — UM/Worcester . Trustee Robertson 
said the Hospital Management Board had met and considered the 
Hospital By-Laws. Two sections of the By-Laws were found to be 
incomplete, and there were questions about the phrasing of one 
section. Therefore, the HMB had unanimously decided to request 
a deferral of the date for submission of the document to the 
Board of Trustees. There was no further discussion, and it was 
moved and seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

change the date for submission of revisions 
to the Medical Center By-Laws to February, 
1978. 



UM/Worcester 
Extension 
of Review of 
Hospital 
By-Laws 



Exec. Comm. 
10/5/77 

Delegation of 
Authority to 
Associate 
Treasurer 
Brand 



Executive 
Session 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Delegation 
of Authority . President Wood said that action on this matter was 
necessary because of Treasurer Johnson's death. An examination 
of the records had shown that in the absence of the Treasurer, 
Mr. Brand, Associate Treasurer, was authorized to endorse the 
payroll and to discharge other routine duties of the Treasurer, 
but there was some question concerning his authority to act on 
contracts. The vote before the Committee would enable the 
Associate Treasurer to act as the Treasurer as well as authoriz- 
ing the Assistant Treasurer to act in the absence of the Associate 
Treasurer. 

Chairman Healey said that in addition to providing the 
requested authority, the Board should examine the matter of the 
financial management of the University. He noted that the duties 
of the Treasurer need not necessarily be coextensive with those 
discharged by Mr. Johnson. Trustee Crain said this examination 
would seem to be appropriate for the Committee on Budget and 
Finance to undertake. The Chairman agreed wholeheartedly. There 
was no further discussion, and it was moved and seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, until 
further vote of the Board, Robert H. Brand, 
Associate Treasurer of the University, be 
authorized to act as Treasurer of the University, 
and to exercise any and all authority heretofore 
delegated to the Treasurer of the University; 
and further, that Ray E. Heiney, Jr., Assistant 
Treasurer, be authorized to act as Treasurer in 
the absence of the Associate Treasurer. 

Chairman Healey then asked for a motion to enter 
executive session in order to discuss Nominations for Honorary 
Degree Recipients , UM/ Amherst, and at 11:29 a.m. it was duly 
moved and seconded, and on roll call unanimously 



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VOTED 



To enter executive session. 



At 12:50 the Committee agreed to end the executive 
session and to adjourn. 




Dorothy Eicnel 

Assistant Secretary to the Board 
of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE: 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

October 5, 1977; 12:30 p.m. 
Faculty Club 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 



Committee Members: Chairman Troy; Trustees Batiste, Breyer and 



Burack; Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding 
Absent Committee Members: Trustees Morgenthau and Winthrop 



The meeting was called to order at 1:05 p.m. by Chair- 
man Troy who then moved that the Preliminary Graduation Lists , 
September, 1977 — UM/Amherst (Doc. T78-020) be recommended for 
approval to the Board. There was no discussion and it was 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
and ratify the Preliminary Graduation Lists of 
September, 1977, UM/Amherst, certified by the 
recorder of that campus and contained in 
Doc. T78-020. 

There was no further business to come before the 
Committee, and the meeting adjourned at 1:08 p.m. 



Dorothy Mchel 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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ATTENDANCE : 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

October 19, 1977; 3:00 p.m. 
14th Floor Conference Room 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Troy; Trustee Burack; Mr 
Colby representing Trustee Winthrop; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Committee Members Absent : Trustees Batiste, Breyer, Fielding and 
Morgenthau 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Ms. Veith and Ms. Wiener, Assistant Vice Presidents for 
Academic Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Allen, Dean, Humanities and 
Fine Arts; Mr. Chappell, Associate Provost for Administration; Mr 
Marcus, Associate Dean, School of Engineering; Messrs. Fagundes , 
Ornelas and Sturm, Department of Spanish and Portuguese 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Ms. Buchanan and Ms. Wi thorn, 
College of Public and Community Service 

Guest: Ms. Shukri, Office of Educational Affairs 



The meeting came to order at 3:07 p.m. Chairman Troy 
called for discussion on the first item on the agenda, Proposal 
for Establishment of an Undergraduate Major in Portuguese — UM/ 



Amherst (Doc. T78-011) . Vice President Lynton said the proposal 
was essentially a formalization of an extant situation — all re- 
sources for a major in Portuguese were now in place; the nec- 
essary courses were already listed in the catalog; and the pro- 
posed major would not entail any budgetary increases. Library 
resources at the University Library were adequate for an under- 
graduate program and could be supplemented by the collections at 
Smith and Mt . Holyoke. Demand for such a program was increasing 
and the only other program in a public institution is one offered 
at Southeastern Massachusetts University. Finally, it was noted 
that the Board of Higher Education had given first stage approval 
to the proposal. There was no further discussion, and it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the establishment of an undergraduate major in 
Portuguese at the University of Massachusetts 



UM/Amherst — 
Proposal for 
Establishment 
of Under- 
graduate major 
in Portuguese 
(Doc. T78-011) 



F&EP Comm. 
10/19/77 



UM/ Amherst — 
Proposal for 
the Establish- 
ment of Under- 
graduate Major 
in Leisure 
Studies and 
Termination of 
Programs in 
Park Administra- 
tion and Leisure 
Studies and 
Services 
(Doc. T78-022) 



UM/Amherst — 
Appointment of 
Clive L. Dym as 
Professor of 
Civil Engineer- 
ing with Tenure 
(Doc. T78-023) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

at Amherst as described in Doc, T78-011. 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item Proposal for the 
Establishment of an Undergraduate Major in Leisure Studies and 
Termination of the Programs in Park Administration, and Leisure 
Studies and Services — UM/Amherst (Doc. T78-022) . The Committee 
was reminded that when the Board had approved the transfer of the 
Department of Leisure Studies and Services to the College of Food 
and Natural Resources, members of the Department and members of 
the Park Administration program undertook to plan a new under- 
graduate major in Leisure Studies and Resources. The proposal 
at hand was the result of this undertaking. In response to a 
comment that the proposed curriculum made little reference to the 
philosophical, scientific or sociological aspects of leisure, Mr. 
Puryear said that the curriculum made provision for these aspects 
in the suggested electives. As in other programs, students would 
have to meet the distribution requirements, and these would serve 
to broaden the intellectual perspective of the students. There 
was no further discussion and it was moved and seconded and 



I 



VOTED 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the establishment of an undergraduate major in 
Leisure Studies and Resources at the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst. 



and further 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the termination of the programs in Park Adminis- 
tration and Leisure Studies and Services at the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst as described 
in Doc. T78-022. 



Trustee Burack said it would be useful if the Trustees could re- 
ceive reports from faculty, students and administrators on pro- 
grams which the Board had approved after such programs had been 
in operation for a year, the reports to deal with the strengths 
and weaknesses of the programs, as well as information about the 
numbers of students enrolled and other statistical matters. Such 
reports, she said, would enable the Trustees to determine in 
which direction the University was going. 

The meeting then turned to the agenda items Appointment 
! of Clive L. Dym as Professor of Civil Engineering with Tenure — 
! UM/Amherst (Doc. T78-023) and Appointment of Martha Paley 
, Francescato as Professor of Spanish and Portuguese with Tenure — 

UM/Amherst (Doc. T78-024) . Trustee Burack said that while she 
: had no questions about the individuals involved, she wished to 
I register strong objections to both appointments because of her 
objection to all initial appointments with tenure, except for 
overwhelming reasons. These she did not find in either case now 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

under discussion. Further, she continued, she was troubled by the 
fact that the dates of some of the documentation regarding Dr. 
Dym indicated that the matter should have come before the Board 
some months ago. Therefore, she registered her objection to 
both appointments on the grounds that she did not think the cases 
put forward justified the level of academic appointment recommended 
along with tenure. Her major objection had to do with the con- 
tinuation of the practice of appointing people with tenure. This 
she would continue to oppose, as, she said, it was detrimental 
to the interests of the University and to the younger faculty. 

Chairman Troy said he disagreed with this stance. He 
felt the University had to have flexibility in particular cases. 
He asked for a statement in support of this position. Mr. Lynton 
said the key issues involved were — first, a chairman functions 
best when tenured, because chairmen have to make tenure decisions; 
second, a chairman functioned more effectively when of senior rank 
When a department chairmanship became vacant, the question of fill- 
ing the vacancy from within the department automatically arose. 
If a person had to be brought in from the outside, that person's 
qualifications for holding a senior rank and tenure had to be 
assessed. In both cases before the Committee, the campus ad- 
ministration and the President's Office felt the candidates 
merited senior rank and tenure. Chancellor Bromery said that in 
the case of Professor Dym, the man was highly qualified, with an 
excellent record of publications and of teaching. 



Mr. Marcus said that Professor Dym had the full support 
of the Department and the School, and had been chosen after a 
search within and without the Department. In addition to his 
academic background he had worked successfully in industry. He 
was an exceptional individual. Mr. Marcus said the Board should 
consider that the engineering field was at the moment highly 
competitive and that, if the school was to retain its outstanding 
status, it would have to flow with the market. Professor Dym 
was an internationally known member of his profession. 



In the case of Professor Francescato, Mr. Allen said 
the Department had asked that an outsider be brought in as chair- 
man, and Professor Francescato had been recommended by a twelve- 
member committee after a very intensive search. Student enroll- 
ments in the Department were up and he, as Dean, had told the 
search committee they were free to pick someone from outside the 
University. Professor Francescato 's publication record was such 
that she would have been considered for a professorship had she 
been already in the employ of the University. Teaching ability 
was a hard thing to judge, but all of the testimony received 
about her ability was favorable. The Department had been seeking 
a specialist in Latin American Literature and Professor Francescato 
fitted this need. Mr. Allen concluded by noting that the Trustees 
should be aware that it was all but impossible to recruit a 
departmental chairman without offering tenure. 



F&EP Comm. 
10/19/77 

UM/Amherst — 
Appointment of 
Martha Paley 
Francescato as 
Professor of 
Spanish and 
Portuguese with 
Tenure 
(Doc. T78-024) 



_-}_ 



F&EP Comm. 
10/19/77 



Proposed 
Memorandum of 
Agreement for 
Establishment 
of Center for 
Materials Re- 
search in 
Archaeology and 
Ethnology 
(Doc. T78-021) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Puryear said the Campus had been very careful in the 
matter of recommending appointments with tenure; in the past year 
out of fifty-five appointments, only four had been with tenure. 
Trustee Burack noted that at an earlier meeting she had urged 
that the University follow a policy frequently employed by many 
other institutions — that of not offering tenure to a professor 
until the candidate had taught for at least one semester as a 
visiting professor. Chairman Troy recalled that this had been 
discussed at a meeting which dealt with the percentages of tenure 
Mr. Lynton noted that a report on this matter was being prepared. 

There was no further discussion and it was moved, 
seconded, and 



I 



VOTED : 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur in 
the appointment by the President of Clive L. Dym 
as Professor of Civil Engineering with tenure at 
the University of Massachusetts at Amherst as set 
forth in Doc. T78-023. 



and further 



VOTED : 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur in 
the appointment by the President of Martha Paley 
Francescato as Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 
with tenure at the University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst as set forth in Doc. T78-024. 



Trustee Burack voted 
earlier. 



no 



on both motions for the reasons stated 



The meeting then turned to the agenda item Proposed 
Memorandum of Agreement for Establishment of Center for Materials 



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; Research in Archaeology and Ethnology (Doc. T78-021) . It was 
noted that the Center began informally in an effort to share 
among major Boston area institutions resources and ideas related 
to materials research in the study of archaeology, art history, 
anthropology and related disciplines. The nine area institutions 
involved now wished to establish a formal center for pursuit of 
this effort. It was assumed that the major portion of the necessary 
funds would come from outside sources and that activities would 
be pursued at each participating institution. Any Center-sponsored 
course, regardless of its location, would be listed in each 
participating institution's catalog as a "home" institution offer- 
ing. Without further discussion it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the President to sign the Memorandum of Agreement 
among Member Institutions establishing the Center 
for Materials Research in Archaeology and Ethnology 
(Doc. T78-021) and to appoint the representatives 
to the Administrative Committee and the Program 
Committee. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The next agenda item was September 1977 Graduation 
List — UM/Boston (Doc. T78-025) , and without discussion, it was 



moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 

and ratify the September 1977 Graduation List — UM/ 
Boston as set forth in Doc. T78-025. 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item Title XX 
Agreement with Department of Public Welfare . Mr. Lynton said 
that Title XX of the Social Security Act of 1974 included pro- 
visions whereby participating states were reimbursed 75 cents 
of each dollar spent in training or educating providers of social 
services. The providers could be either employees of human serv- 
ices agencies or individuals such as, for example, foster parents. 
The type of training/education provided could range from one-day 
workshops to graduate-level programs. A number of states 
(Massachusetts not among them) had already availed themselves of 
the educational funds provided by Title XX. For example, last 
year Connecticut had spent $14 million, 25 percent of which was 
state money, the rest federal. 



About a year and a half ago, Mr. Lynton continued, the 
Executive Office of Human Services had decided that the Common- 
wealth should participate in this program and to this end had 
formed a task force with representatives from the Departments of 
Mental Health and Public Welfare, the Office of Elderly Affairs 
and other interested parties. These last included representatives 
from the College of Public and Community Services and the Institute 
for Governmental Services. The task force was charged with as- 
sessing the educational needs in this area and suggesting ways in 
which these needs could best be met. The task force had produced 
a preliminary report which called for the development of workshops 
at several levels of competence and the development of a modular 
core curriculum for various degree programs in the delivery of 
human services . 

In its report, Mr. Lynton said, the task force explicit- 
ly looked to the University to assume the lead in developing the 
various courses and programs, and to coordinate the enterprise 
when it got underway. The relationship between the University 
and the Office of Human Services would be a contractual one, and 
as such would be on a year-by-year basis. However, it was 
assumed that the relationship would continue for a minimum of thrde 
years. The Office of Human Services has designated the Depart- 
ment of Public Welfare as its operative agency; the President, in 
turn, has named the Institute of Government Services to assume 
management responsibility, with a University Steering Committee 
chaired by Mr. Lynton. 



F&EP Comm. 
10/19/77 

UM/Boston — 

September 1977 

Graduation 

List 

(Doc. T78-025) 



Title XX Agree- 
ment with DPW 



tinued, 



In the matters of expected benefits, Mr. Lynton con- 
it was apparent that the program should result in 



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F&EP Coram. 
10/19/77 



Executive 
Session 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

substantial benefits to the human services agencies. The 
University would benefit as well by discharging its mandate to 
offer service to the people of the Commonwealth and by develop- 
ing expertise in courses and techniques which would be trans- 
ferable to other programs. 

There was a problem concerning matching funds, Mr. 
Lynton continued, which was the subject of discussions between 
the University and the Department of Public Welfare. The federal 
government is providing a reimbursement of 75 cents for every 
dollar of total program cost, and expects agencies and instrument- 
alities of the state to "match" the remaining 25 cents. The Uni- 
versity is insisting that the responsibility for this match be 
shared between the human service agencies and the University. 
Careful calculations have indicated that for the rest of FY77 
the University could carry out the project on the basis of the 
75 percent reimbursement. However, in future years it would be 
necessary for the participating agencies to bear part of the bur- 
den of the non-federal 25 percent. It was this matter which was 
now being discussed, and when this was resolved, the project 
would be formally presented to the Board. 

There then ensued a brief discussion of the intricacies 
involved in deciding what monies the state could legitimately 
count as part of its share of the non-federal funds involved; the 
provisions included in federal programs designed to help needy 
communities which often defeat the purpose of the programs; and 
the unresolved question of the match. 

Trustee Burack asked if, in addition to struggling with 
the procedural aspects of the project, work was going ahead on 
the programmatic aspects. Ms. Buchanan, speaking as Field 
Director of the CPCS and as a member of the national task force 
on Title XX, said the program was seen as an ideal vehicle to 
help the University in its efforts to help the human service 
agencies, by providing a quality educational program. Ms. 
Withorn said that the idea of developing a core curriculum, which 
was a central part of the state's training planning, and which 
the University was being asked to do, represented a rare oppor- 
tunity. If it was done and done well, it could become a model 
for the nation as a whole. 

At 4:40 p.m. it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session in order to discuss 
tenure appeals. 



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session. 



At 5:10 p.m. the Committee voted to end the executive 



Without discussion it was moved, seconded and 



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VOTED : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To ask the President to direct Chancellor Golino 
to institute a de novo review of Professor 
Herbert P. Bix's candidacy for tenure. As 
part of this review, the Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of History shall solicit an evaluation of 
Professor Bix's scholarly work from a number of 
distinguished historians whose reputation and 
objectivity is recognized by everyone. 



To ask President Wood to reconsider his de- 
cision regarding the tenure candidacy of 
Harold C. Gotoff on the basis of additional 
evidence. 



There was no further business to come before the 
Committee, and the meeting adjourned at 5:15 p.m. 



and further 



VOTED : 



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tiJLuL 



Dorothy E^chel 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 



F&EP Comm. 
10/19/77 



Tenure 
Appeals 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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NOT USED 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

October 20, 1977; 1:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

ATTENDANCE: | Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Spiller; Trustee Kassler 
Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop; Mr. Brand, Associate 
Treasurer; Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Burack, Clark, McNulty and 
Romer 

Other Trustees : Trustee Batiste 

Office of the President : Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Plan- 
ning; Mr. Brigham, Senior University Planner; Mr. Meehan, Consul- 
tant to the Planning Office 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student Af- 
fairs; Ms. Green, Student Affairs Office; Professor Stengle, Fac- 
ulty Advisor, and Mr. Bonacker and Ms. Davis, Outing Club 

UM/Boston : Mr. Baxter, Vice Chancellor for Administration and 
Finance 

Guest : Ms. Shukri, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 1:05 p.m. by Chair- 
man Spiller. 

At the request of Chairman Spiller, Mr. Woodbury, Act- 
ing Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, UM/Amherst, introduced 
the first agenda item, Revision to Motor Vehicle Rules and Regu- 
lations — UM/Amherst (Doc. T78-027). He explained that each year 
the campus issued rules and regulations for the operation of 
motor vehicles on campus. He said that the campus was withhold- 
ing the issuance of new regulations pending approval by the Board 
of Trustees. He said that one additional change had been neces- 
sitated since the document had been forwarded to the Trustees, 
and that was a change in the enforcement hours for one parking 
area, which are to begin at 4 a.m. rather than 7 a.m. In re- 
sponse to a query from Trustee Kassler, Mr. Woodbury explained 
that there is a Parking and Transportation Committee on campus 
composed of students, faculty, staff and union representatives, 
which is consulted on these matters. Several Trustees questioned 
why an administrative item such as this must come before the 
Trustees. Ms. Robinson explained that only Trustees have had 
authority to adopt rules and regulations. The question arose as 
to whether this authority could be delegated. It was agreed that 
this matter would be explored with Counsel. Without further 



UM/Amherst — 
Revision to 
Motor Vehicle 
Rules and Regu- 
lations 
(Doc. T78-027) 



B&G Coram. 
10/20/77 



UM/Amherst — 
Land Purchase 
by Outing Club 
(Doc. r T78-026) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

discussion, on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees amend the 

Motor Vehicle Rules and Regulations for the Amherst 
campus (Doc. T75-155) as follows: 

(1) By inserting after Section 9 of Article I the 
following new section: 

Section 9A - PARKING GARAGE — Any structure 
or facility designed and constructed either in 
whole or in part for the purpose of providing 
space for the parking of vehicles therein. 
Specific areas within such a facility may be 
designated and treated as if it were a parking 
lot, to which all relevant regulations con- 
tained herein shall apply. 

(2) By inserting after the words "between 6 p.m. 
and 7 a.m." in Article I, Section 18 the follow- 
ing: "except Parking Lot #21 between 6 p.m. 
and 4 a.m." 

(3) By striking from Section 2, Group C of Article 
VIII, the figure "$2.00" and inserting in place 
thereof the following: "$5.00." 

(4) By striking paragraph (A) of Section 3 of Arti- 
cle IX and inserting in place thereof the fol- 
lowing : 

(A) All appeals made to the Appeals Board must 
be submitted in writing to the Department 
of Public Safety within seven (7) calendar 
days from the date of receiving the park- 
ing violation notice. Forms on which ap- 
peals are to be submitted may be obtained 
from the Department of Public Safety. 

Chairman Spiller then asked Mr. Woodbury to speak to 
the second agenda item, Land Purchase by Outing Club — UM/Amherst 
(Doc. T78-026). Mr. Woodbury first introduced campus representa- 
tives who had been working on the Proposal — Ms. Ruth Green of the 
Student Affairs Office; Professor Thomas R. Stengle, Faculty Ad- 
visor to the Outing Club; Mr. Andrew Bonacker, President, and 
Karen M. Davis, Treasurer of the Outing Club. 

Chairman Spiller asked how much money was involved in 
the purchase of the land. Professor Stengle said the asking 
price at the present time was $6000. With regard to funds for 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

construction and upkeep, he said the Outing Club had raised 
$6000 from a concession at the Spring Concert on campus. In 
addition, he said, the Club had raised approximately $3300 in 
donations from former Outing Club members and friends. Mr. 
Woodbury said that he had a letter from the Treasurer of the 
Student Senate allocating $6000 to the Outing Club for the land 
purchase. The Outing Club, he said, was one of the largest and 
most active student activities on campus. 

Chairman Spiller said that legally the Trustees would 
own the land and, therefore, they must approve its purchase. 
Trustee Kassler said he thought it was a desirable enterprise, 
but that it was important that the Club could support the necessary 
insurance, taxes, maintenance and other costs; however, he said 
given their ability to raise as much money as they had on a single 
enterprise, he did not believe this would be a problem. He 
cautioned the necessity of having sufficient liability insurance. 
This was especially necessary, he said, where the land was out 
of state and the cabin would be rented to persons outside of the 
University. He suggested that counsel be consulted about the 
appropriate amount of insurance coverage. 

In response to a query, Professor Stengle said that 
the cabin would be available on a priority basis to groups both 
on and off campus at a minimal charge. Trustee Kassler said he 
hoped that students at UM/Boston would be invited to use the 
facility before it was offered to clubs outside the University. 
On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Associate Treasurer Robert H. Brand be 
authorized and empowered to enter into negotiations 
for and in behalf of the University to purchase 
two parcels of land described as follows: 



(1) Property of C. Kenneth Miller, Roger J. 
Fabian and Charles W. Ginste located on 
the westerly side of Mt. Agassiz Road and 
containing 3.2 acres, more or less; 

(2) Property of C. Kenneth Miller located on the 
westerly side of Mt. Agassiz Road, and con- 
taining 6.3 acres, more or less. 

(NOTE: Both parcels of land are located in 
Bethlehem, New Hampshire and are outlined on 
the attached map.) 

That Associate Treasurer Brand be further authorized 
and empowered upon completion of said negotiations 
satisfactory to him, to execute all agreements 
necessary for the University to acquire said 
property. 



B&G Comm. 
10/20/77 



-3- 



B&G Comm. 
10/20/77 



Program for 
100 Arlington 
Street 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Further, the Associate Treasurer be authorized 
to execute any and all instruments necessary to 
consummate the purchase of said parcel in the name 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the use 
of the Trustees of the University of Massachusetts; 
provided, that the payment for such purchase shall 
be made from funds made available for the purpose 
from student activities accounts, or from funds 
contributed for the purpose to the University. 

Further, the Associate Treasurer be authorized, 
upon approval of the General Counsel, to retain 
the services of legal counsel in New Hampshire 
for the sole purpose of title examination, the 
drafting of necessary agreements and other matters 
incidental to the purchase of said land. 

Chairman Spiller next asked Ms. Robinson to introduce 
the matter of the Program for 100 Arlington Street . She said 
that the University had been working with the Boston campus to 
produce a detailed program for the renovation which could be 
available as soon as the designer was selected. She said an 
initial draft had been prepared for discussion by the Committee. 
Since previous Trustee action had established the outline for 
the program, the next formal action was anticipated at the stage 
of preliminary design. Mr. Meehan, consultant to the Planning 
Office, reported that the building had been surveyed for electrical 
system needs and capabilities and plumbing requirements , and that 
a basic design for an air-conditioning system was already in 
schematic form. He said this preliminary work was necessary 
if the fast-track schedule was to be met. 



Mr. Brigham said that the Planning Office had been 
working on plans by which the arrangement of activities in the 
central offices could be made more efficient; for example, opera- 
tions such as Xeroxing, mailing, and collating of the large 
amounts of materials which are mailed to Trustees by the Secretar} 
Office had been centrally located and work space provided. 

Also, the space occupied by the College of Public and 
Community Service was being reorganized to meet their needs 
more effectively. In planning these renovations, Mr. Brigham 
said, an attempt would be made to keep the space flexible in 
order to accommodate changing needs as they may arise in the 
future. 

Trustee Batiste asked whether the $980,000 for renova- 
tions included the cost of moving the offices. Ms. Robinson 
said that it did not, but that the money for the move had been 
reserved for this purpose in the President's Office budget. 
Trustee Batiste said she was concerned that the move would en- 
tail a drain on funds available for campus use. Ms. Robinson 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

said the only cost to the Boston campus would be a minimal amount 
of moving expense for the College of Public and Community Service 
since campus personnel would be used. Mr, Baxter, Vice Chancellor 
for Administration and Finance at UM/Boston said he expected the 
cost to be under $1000. Trustee Kassler asked what the estimated 
cost for moving the President's Office was, and Ms. Robinson 
replied between $15,000 and $20,000. 

Trustee Kassler expressed his concern about the quota- 
tion in the program document of the September vote of the Board 
and the emphasis this placed on the long-range plan for the 
building. It was his understanding from the previous Committee 
meeting, he said, that the planning Office had been told to 
emphasize the renovation of the space for the central administra- 
tive offices and the two extra floors, and to redraft the document 

Ms. Robinson said that the document under discussion 
at that time was the material to be used by the Trustees in tak- 
ing the case for the renovation appropriation to the Governor 
and the legislative leadership. Those meetings had not yet taken 
place. As far as the program for the designer was concerned, 
which was the document before the Committee, it was felt to be 
important for the designer to realize that the renovation was 
part of an overall plan for the building so that the space design 
and utilities would be approached with that in mind. 

Trustee Kassler said that it was the Trustees' clear 
intent to focus on the four &) floor renovation and that the long- 
range plan might never come to pass. He said that he was con- 
cerned that if the Legislature saw the request as only the first 
phase of a more expensive renovation program, the request would 
not be favorably received. Mr. Colby said he thought, to the 
contrary, that the Legislature would not be inclined to make an 
investment of this magnitude unless they saw it as part of a 
program for long-range renovation of the entire structure. 

Discussion ensued on the Trustees' intent and on the 
pros and cons of referencing the long-term plans for the build- 
ing. 

Chairman Spiller said he did not see where a problem 
existed. The Committee had been interested in the concept of an 
educational facility, he said, and the architect needed to know 
that his plans should be consistent with a long-range plan for 
the renovation of the total building. Meanwhile, the intent 
of the Trustees was simply to renovate four floors at the present 
time. Mr. Brigham said the design should be seen as establishing 
a standard for renovation, and it was important that the designers 
viewed the renovations as of a permanent and not a temporary 
nature. Mr. Meehan explained that renovations of the various 
mechanical systems in the building would be done in one way if 



B&G Comm, 
10/20/77 



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B&G Comm. 
10/20/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

only four floors were involved, and in another if there was to be 
a possible future connection with other floors. He said the 
designer needed to be instructed to undertake the renovations in 
such a way that they could accommodate to a future renovation 
of the rest of the building, but, at the same time, would not 
require expansion at this stage. 

Trustee Kassler said there was full support, he believed 
for the capital outlay for the renovation of the four floors and 
for the design to allow for future renovation. He said he might 
be overly sensitive to the idea that this might be viewed 
as the first step of an expensive renovation program. Chairman 
Spiller said it was true that Legislators might see "Phase I" 
and jump to the conclusion that the University would be back the 
next year for money for Phase II. The architects, he said, must 
understand three things: 1) that two office floors should be 
designed as permanent space, 2) that two floors should be designed 
with flexibility, and 3) that mechanical systems should be de- 
signed for flexibility. 

Ms. Robinson said she felt that it was important to 
some of the Trustees that this facility be seen as a University 
center, with an emphasis on educational activities, but not a 
part of the Boston campus. She said these Trustees were also 
concerned that the College of Public and Community Service not be 
displaced. The September vote was the outcome of this concern. 
She said she had understood from Ms. Pinck of the Office of 
Educational Affairs that the proposed renovation plan had the 
full support of the Governor; and, therefore, she did not see 
the wording of the document as a major problem. 

Chairman Spiller commented that the Trustees had in- 
dicated they would like to hold Board meetings on the campuses 
and Committee meetings at the central office. He said he was 
comfortable with the way in which planning for meeting spade 
was approached in the document. 

Ms. Robinson said that the draft document had been pre- 
sented merely as a means of keeping the Committee informed on 
the progress of planning activities, and no action was necessary 
at this time. 

Chairman Spiller asked Mr. Brigham to report briefly 
on activities at Columbia Point. Mr. Brigham said that sub- 
sequent to the work done by the Peninsula Planning Committee, 
the Mayor's "Boston Plan," which included the area as one of 
four priorities, had been released in draft form. He said the 
Boston Plan is in some ways less ambitious than the PPC plan, 
but the plans were substantially identical. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 2:27 p.m. 



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Dorothy Eichel 

Assistant Secretary to the Board 
of Trustees 

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ATTENDANCE : 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

October 27, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Shearer; Trustees Baker, 



Batiste and Kassler; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; 
Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees McNeil, Morgenthau, Okin 



and Romer 

Office of the President: Ms. Hanson, Director, Office of the 



Budget, and Associate Vice President; Ms. Simmons, Assistant 
Vice President for Academic Affairs 



UM/Amherst: 



Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs; Mr. Preston, Associate Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs; Ms. Gist, Director, New World Day School; Mr. Segor, 
Coordinator of Child-Care Programs 

UM/Boston: Mr. Tubbs , Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Ms. 



Kelley, Director, Child-Care Program; Mr. Bondy, Director, Student 
Support Services; Professor Schwartz, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Feinblatt, Associate Dean and Director of 



Student Affairs 



Guest: Ms. Shukri, Office of Educational Affairs 



The meeting came to order at 10:05 a.m. Chairman 
Shearer called for discussion on the agenda item, Child Care — 
UM/Amherst. Mr. Segor said the report at hand was an attempt to 
review the five currently existing day-care programs at Amherst. 
The programs had begun at varying times over the last six years. 
They had been developed by groups of parents who then turned to 
the University for assistance. Fees for the programs were 
charged at a flat rate, as opposed to a scale based on parental 
income. The fees were set as low as possible. The programs were 
subsidized by funds from the Student Affairs office, federal and 
state grants, and the Student Government. Care was provided to 
about 150 families each semester. 

The second part of the report, Mr. Segor continued, 
reflected his own concerns about the system. Funding for the 
system had generally developed in response to critical situa- 
tions. There had not been a clearly articulated policy concern- 
ing the level of support for the programs by the University. 

A continuing and national concern, he said, was the 



UM/Amherst 
Child Care 



Student Affairs 
10/27/77 



UM/Boston — 
Child Care 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

salaries paid to staff. This situation was the major cause of 
the high rate of staff turnover. One of the best things about 
the system at Amherst, Mr. Segor said, was the diversity of pro- 
grams offered. The programs varied in size as well as in philos- 
ophy. All centers had the same admissions priorities: first, 
children of University of Massachusetts students; second, those 
of students from the other Five Colleges; and then came children 
of faculty and staff at these institutions. About 85 percent of 
those enrolled were children of UMass students, he said. 

Mr. Segor said the number of places for three- to five- 
year olds was at the level of demand; however, there was at present, 
an oversupply of toddlers or infants. In the matter of providing 
linkages between the child-care programs and other programs on 
campus, Mr. Segor said, the system did have certain direct linkages; 
for example, the largest center, the University Day School, was 
a laboratory school for the School of Education. 

Trustee Batiste said that she was pleased with the child - 
care program as were many other students. As the program became 
better known, and because of demographic factors, it seemed likely 
that greater demands would be forthcoming. She said she shared 
the concern about budgetary matters, particularly the dependence 
on Student Government allocations, which tended to fluctuate. She 
asked if facilities at the other Five Colleges could be used to 
reduce overcrowding. Mr. Segor said that the Student Government 
monies were never budgeted for direct operating costs, thus in- 
sulating the programs from the impact of their fluctuations. Also 
there were no available facilities or funds to support the pro- 
trams at the other Five Colleges. 



The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Child Care — 
UM/Boston. Mr. Tubbs said that Boston now had three child-care 
centers. Experience had shown that child-care would be a con- 
tinuing need and his office was working out a long-range plan. 
The plan would go through the governance process , thus creating 
a child-care program which would be acceptable to the University 
community, rather than operating in an ad hoc fashion, as it had 
in the past. He then asked Ms. Kelley to describe the program 
in more detail. Ms. Kelley said the three centers at Boston in- 
cluded the main facility located in the Science Building at the 
Harbor Campus. This facility was licensed to accommodate fifty 
children. As state law limited to ten the number of toddlers in 
any one space, the Center had that number of toddlers and forty 
pre-schoolers. Also, on the Harbor Campus there was a parent 
co-op which, in addition to developing as a child-care center, 
was seeking permanent quarters. The center would probably con- 
centrate on infant and toddler care, as that seemed to be in 
greatest demand. At present, there were eleven children accommo- 
dated at any one time. At 100 Arlington Street there was a very 
small center which could accommodate, at most, ten children at a 
time. The center tried to offer morning and evening sessions 
so as to reflect the CPCS class schedule. It was extremely 



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difficult to provide evening sessions on a self-sustaining basis. 
At present there was no solution to this problem. Demand for 
care in the afternoon was increasing, and efforts to meet this 
demand were underway. 

In the matter of funding, Ms. Kelley continued, only 
the main Center received funds from Title XX. The parent co-op 
was supported by fees and Student Activities Committee money. 
Because of the dedication of the parents, the co-op showed every 
sign of becoming self-sustaining. The Center at 100 Arlington 
Street was in the weakest condition. Despite its many problems, 
however, there were signs that it would eventually become self- 
sustaining. The campus intended to apply for future Title XX 
fundings . 

The Boston program, Ms. Kelley continued, differed 
from that at Amherst in several ways. For instance, there was 
neither a department nor a school of education. Thus, there were 
not so many resources for student teachers and placements as at 
Amherst. Student-teacher placements were arranged with Boston 
area institutions, Wheelock College in particular. A program 
to supplement the staff was being developed in conjunction with 
the Educational Development Corporation, South Boston High 
School and the Institute for Learning and Teaching. The program 
was expected to begin in January. While supplemental staff could 
not be listed as part of the staff, their efforts were very help- 
ful in providing a quality program. Also, there was a consultant 
who came every other week to discuss and advise on problems. 

The Child-Care staff felt very strongly that long-range 
plans should include a family-care system and a tie-in with the 
after-school program of the Boston public schools. A contact 
had been established at Columbia Point, but this had to be broken 
because of social tensions. 

The centers worked with several of the academic programs 
at the University. There were numerous contacts with the Center 
for Human Growth and Development at College III, and, in conjunc- 
tion with the Media Center and the Theater Department, a film 
on child-care programs at Boston was being produced. Frequently 
individual students expressed interest in working with the pro- 
gram. Such students were asked to provide a written description 
of their intended project. These were then reviewed and approved 
by the Parents Advisory board. 

In the ensuing discussion Ms. Kelley noted that the 
sliding fee scale had been recommended by the Parents Advisory 
Board and that, where needed, subsidies were provided from the 
Student Activities Committee funds. Also, the present parent 
mix was 70 percent student, 15 percent staff, and 15 percent 
faculty. It was hoped that the mix would, at some point, include 
children of parents from the community. This had already been 



Student Affairs 
10/27/77 



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Student Affairs 
10/27/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

tried during the summer and it had worked well. In the matter 
of the staggered schedule, Ms. Kelley noted that the professional 
staff had been doubtful about this when it was first proposed, but: 
it had worked out well. 

Chairman Shearer referred to the report at hand and 
asked if the budget options therein were listed in order of pre- 
ference. Ms. Kelley said that the second option, that of trans- 
ferring two "soft" money positions to "hard" money positions 
had top priority. If this were done, the fragmenting of the 
programs budget would be largely eliminated. Ms. Kelley noted 
that the budget options did not provide for any expansion; they 
were designed to fund the program as it was at present. The 
Title XX reimbursement of $6.14 per child per day, Ms. Kelley 
said, was the lowest in the state. Mr. Segor quickly pointed out 
that the comparable figure at Amherst was $4.70 per child per day 
Mr. Segor said that the reimbursements were based on the fees 
charged to the public. The Amherst fee schedule reflected a 
subsidy from the University and thus the University found itself 
in a "catch 22" situation. Ms. Kelley said that this situation 
led to the compiling of an incredible deficit. Trustee Kassler 
asked if other centers found themselves in this same position, 
and if so, how they handled it. Ms. Kelley said they put in the 
maximum budget . 

Ms. Kelley said that UM/Boston was not only appealing 
to have its contract renegotiated, but was also reviewing pro- 
cedures in order to process contracts more easily through the 
appropriate offices of the University. Chairman Shearer asked 
if it was true that if both campuses were to successfully renegoti- 
ate their reimbursement rates, they would still need additional 
subsidies. Ms. Kelley said that renegotiated rates would put her 
operation in fairly good shape. If subsidies were still forthcom- 
ing, expansion of services could be considered. A built-in pro- 
blem, she indicated, was that the child-care staff was not only 
not paid properly but did not receive the same raises as those 
granted to other state employees. What were needed were "hard" 
money positions and a reasonable reimbursement rate. Chairman 
Shearer said this required more discussion, but it seemed that 
the matter should be referred to the Budget and Finance Committeel 

Trustee Baker said she was concerned about space for 
the centers as well as the budget. It was her understanding that 
consideration was being given to convert the space presently used 
by the parents' co-op at the Harbor Campus into classrooms. 
Trustee Kassler said the Committee should consider making a 
statement on this matter to the Buildings and Grounds Committee 
and to the Planning Staff. At the Buildings and Grounds meeting, 
he continued, assurances had been given that no definite plans 
for the elimination of any space would be made without first con- 
sulting faculty and students. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In the matter of permanent positions for the child-care 
program, Mr. Tubbs said this should be looked at very carefully. 
A number of other areas on campus which were also funded with 
soft money had to be taken into account. He pointed out that the 
University had increased the funds for the child-care operation, 
and this should be compared with areas which had not fared so 
well. In response to Trustee Kassler's question, Mr. Tubbs said 
it would not be inappropriate to seek permanent positions; however^, 
unless a solid rationale could be developed showing that the 
centers were part of the learning experience, the chances of 
getting permanent funding were very small. Mr. Woodbury said the 
problem of having to pay people whose positions should be on 
permanent funding with temporary funds existed on both campuses. 



Trustee Kassler asked if the two campuses were develop- 
ing a general plan to resolve this matter. Ms. Hanson pointed out 
that the problem stemmed from the fact that only the Legislature 
could create permanently funded positions. Further, the Legislature 
held that the number of permanent positions should be reduced. 
She concluded by saying that the University could not reassign 
permanently funded positions without legislative approval. 

Trustee Kassler said he was satisfied that the evidence 
demonstrated a need for permanent positions in the child-care pro- 
gram. However, he was unsure if the Committee should act on this 
matter in a piecemeal fashion, or if it should wait until the 
campuses had made plans addressing the whole issue, including 
priorities . 

Chairman Shearer said she had been a member of the 
advisory committee on UM/Boston before the campus had opened. 
Even at that time she had asked for the provision of day-care 
services. While she was aware of the many other needs, she felt 
that child care was a different kind of support. If it were not 
available, students with children would not be able to enroll. 
She said the child-care program should have a base and should not 
have to struggle constantly to survive. 



Trustee Kassler said he agreed absolutely that the 
Committee should make an expression of its feeling that funds 
should be made available for maintenance of the child-care program 
at current levels. He stressed that even if it had to be under- 
scored, this had to be a priority matter for funding within exist- 
ing resources. Chairman Shearer said that this would certainly 
be the basis of any definitive recommendation the Committee might 
make. However, she was uncertain if the Committee was now in a 
position to make such a recommendation. Possibly, what should be 
done was to alert the Budget and Finance Committee that in its 
deliberations it should be aware of the needs of the child-care 
services. 

Professor Schwartz said it should be noted that it 
would seem to be opportune, either for Student Affairs or 



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10/27/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Buildings and Grounds, to formally recommend that the renovations 
now planned for 100 Arlington Street include provisions for 
child-care services. Also, he said it did not seem to him that 
enough effort was going into attempts to get outside funding, 
particularly federal grants. Finally, he said, he agreed that if 
the learning experience aspect of the child-care program were 
more formally stated, the possibility of getting permanent funding 
would be enhanced. 

Mr. Tubbs said that a number of proposals for grants had 
been submitted to federal agencies; none had been successful. It 
was his belief that a definite academic component should be in- 
cluded in the previously mentioned long-range plan for child-care 
programs. One problem, Ms. Kelley said, was that there was no one 
department which was an appropriate partner in an effort to pro- 
vide learning experiences, rather it was a group of departments. 
The Boston program was not set up to be a laboratory school. 
Learning experiences did take place, but these were usually the 
result of the efforts of individual teachers. 



Mr. Segor cautioned that providing learning experiences 
in child-care centers, particularly for students who appeared 
without any previous knowledge of how a day-care center operated, 
placed yet a further burden on an already overburdened staff and 
could deflect from the primary purpose of the center. The same w4s 
true of the development of grant proposals. Very few centers 
had the capacity to do research and development as well as to 
provide quality care. 



Mr. Callahan asked why, given the number of soft money 
programs existing everywhere in the University, the Committee 
had chosen to discuss the child-care program. Chairman Shearer 
said that it was felt that the program was important and had 
never really been looked at closely. Further, there was the 
belief that if the University was to offer such a program it 
should be a good one, and that the Trustees should make a commit- 
ment to a quality program. In response to the Chairman's ques- 
tion regarding child-care services at Worcester, Mr. Feinblatt 
said that there had been no overwhelming demand by the students 
for child care at Worcester. There had been some interest on 
the part of faculty and staff. An ad hoc group was trying to 
develop such a program. Trustee Kassler said in his opinion the 
role and function of day care was a support service to students 
and should not apply to faculty and staff. 

In concluding the discussion, Chairman Shearer asked 
when the report from Boston would be available. Mr. Tubbs said 
it would be available in the spring. Trustee Kassler asked if 
it would be possible to have an interim report before that time 
to deal with 1) what existing staff services could be made 
available to the day-care program, 2) further interfacing between 
the academic departments and the day-care program, 3) what 



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administrative services would be made available with regard to 
grantsmanship, and 4) what established liaison would exist be- 
tween the day-care program personnel and the central administra- 
tion. Also, he asked about the possibility of a meeting between 
the staffs of UM/Amherst and UM/Boston to discuss the possibility 
of using student reachers from Amherst at the Boston Campus. 
Chairman Shearer asked if the campuses could make statements on 
these matters by January, 1978. Ms. Kelley thanked the Trustees 
for their time and reminded them that the film on the day-care 
center now in production would be completed in November. 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Allocation 
of Resources for Student Affairs . Ms. Simmons said the Committee 
in asking for information on the allocations to student affairs, 
had not been seeking detailed analysis; what was wanted were 
general indications as to whether resources were increasing or 
decreasing, descriptions of major personnel within the area, and 
some indication of current problems and future trends. The re- 
ports at hand differentiated between state and non-state funds. 
They showed that the FY76/77 budgets resulted in fewer funds 
going to student affairs; however, the budget for FY78 showed 
some recovery. The reports, Ms. Simmons continued, could not be 
compared one with the other, because the areas that reported to 
Student Affairs on each campus differed. 

Mr. Woodbury said that, as had been indicated, there 
was a large drop in funds in FY76 for student affairs. In 
dollar amounts the budget for FY78 was at about the level of that 
of FY75. During the fiscal crisis several areas underwent a 
major beating — career counseling and placement were virtually 
decimated. 

In addition to restoring the more traditional student 
services, Mr. Woodbury continued, there were developing trends 
that would probably impact heavily on future student affairs 
budgets . These trends could be characterized as the result of 
trying to serve a more diverse student population. An example, 
as just discussed, was the need to provide child care. Also, 
the need to make provision for the handicapped had been allocated 
to the Handicapped Affairs Office (in FY77, $14,000; in FY78, 
$70,000). Another area of fiscal impact was the growing move- 
ment towards consumerism, with its overtones of truth in 
advertising. For example, brochures on financial aid now had 
to be much more detailed, with a resultant increase in production 
costs. Student demands for accountability would almost certainly 
result in a growing need for legal support. To summarize, Mr. 
Woodbury said, the emphasis in the coming year would be to 
restore the career counseling placement operation, to meet the 
needs of the handicapped, to improve the financial aid operation, 
and to make needed salary equalization adjustments. 

Mr. Preston said the Trustees should realize that in 



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UM/Amherst — 
Allocation of 
Resources for 
Student Affairs 



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UM/Boston — 
Allocations of 
Resources for 
Student Affairs 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

discussing the budget of the Student Affairs office there was, 
in addition to the dollars and other resources, the need to apply 
these resources in a timely fashion. One of the major problems 
lay in anticipating issues which could become crises and being 
unable to apply the resources necessary to prevent the crises. A 
prime example of this could be found in the placement office. 
Some five years ago the Student Affairs Committee wanted to 
improve placement activities on campus. At that time, because 
of full employment and other factors, the students held placement 
in such low regard that they considered urging that the office 
be abolished. This was only partly due to unrest caused by the w^r 
in Vietnam. In any event, the budgetary crisis intervened, a 
hiring freeze was imposed, and as positions in the placement 
office became vacant, they could not be filled. Now, after 
a long gap in time, efforts to revitalize the operation could 
be undertaken. Trustee Batiste said that placement was now a 
top priority item for the students, and they would like to see 
the plans of the placement office for the next four years 
fulfilled. 

Speaking to the matter of Allocation of Resources for 
Student Affairs — UM/Boston, Mr. Tubbs said one of the difficul- 
ties he faced was the need or tendency to refer to students in 
terms of full-time equivalencies. The 7,400 F.T.E. students 
that the Boston Student Affairs Office had to serve were, in 
fact, some 8,300 persons. In the report at hand, Mr. Tubbs con- 
tinued, the budget summary showed only monies that went directly 
to student affairs programs and did not reflect the $550,000 in 
Disadvantaged Student and State Scholarship Funds which had been 
included in an earlier budget summary distributed to the Com- 
mittee. About 80 percent of the funds used for student services 
derived from fees and other funds; 20 percent came from the state 

The University's career counseling placement operation, 
Mr. Tubbs continued, had shrunk during the hiring freeze from 
four persons to one. Efforts were now underway to restore the 
service and consideration was being given to having faculty 
members serve as part-time counselors. Presently faculty members 
were serving as counselors in the Another Course to College 
program. As with Amherst, the FY78 budget brought the Student 
Affairs Office back to FY75 dollars, and the additional funds 
would be concentrated in career counseling, placement and 
handicapped student programs. Professor Schwartz said he felt 
it would be helpful if the Boston campus were to supply a Positioh 
Summary /Vacancy Profile as had been included in the Amherst 
report . 



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Mr. Feinblatt described Allocation of Resources for 
Student Affairs — UM/Worcester . 



UM/ Worcester — 

Allocation of 

Resources for ly unstructured, having been in existence for only one year. 



Student Affairs were comparative- 
nce for only one year. 
Student Affairs I Very few state funds were available. Long-range plans were now 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

being developed. The Office had a staff of two — a part-time Dean 
and Director, and an administrative secretary. The department 
was responsible only for Student Counseling and the Student Health 
Service. 



Waivers 



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The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Tuition 
Ms. Simmons said the Committee had requested further 
information regarding Tuition Waivers at its last meeting. The 
information was now available. The Amherst campus had indicated 
the names of possible recipients of Athletic Tuition Waivers and 
their need status. Of the sixty-one possible recipients, twenty- 
six had need; one had no need, and thirty-four were not catego- 
rized, as they had not applied for aid. 

Before the Committee could make a recommendation, Ms. 
Simmons continued, three issues had to be dealt with: 

1) Whether tuition waivers should be based on need, 

2) Whether tuition waivers should be used as a 
recruiting device, 

3) Whether tuition waivers should be used as 
compensation. 

At the next meeting the Committee would receive a report 
on the Barber Fund in terms of how athletes are funded. The 
campuses would be asked to respond on the particular categories 
of services where waivers for a significant contribution would be 
appropriate. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was adjourned at 12:18 p.m. 



Student Affairs 
10/27/77 



Tuition 

Waivers 




ElOjUU 



Dorothy Eajchel 

Assistant Secretary to the Board 
of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

November 2, 1977; 9:00 a.m. 
Faculty Dining Rooms A,B,C 
Medical Sciences Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Crain, President Wood; 
Trustees Dennis, Marks, Troy; Mr. Brand, Acting Treasurer; Ms. 
Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Gordon and Spiller 

Other Trustees : Mr. Ames, representing Trustee Dukakis 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director and Associate Vice President 
Mr. Hester, Associate Vice President for Business Services; Mr. 
Hogan, University Controller; Mr. Searson, University Counsel 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. McBee, Vice Chancellor for 
Administration and Finance; Mr. Beatty, Director, Budget and 
Institutional Studies; Professor Brogan, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Mr. Baxter, Vice Chancellor for Administration and 
Finance; Professor Martin, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor for Administration 
and Finance; Mr. Cathey, Controller 

Invited Guests : Mr. Eve and Ms. Kolakoski, Institute for 
Governmental Services 



The meeting was called to order at 9:15 a.m. by Chair- 
man Crain, who introduced the single agenda item, Title XX Agree- 
ment (Doc. T78-028) , stating that this was a very complex matter. 
He then asked President Wood to explain the program. President 
Wood said that Title XX was a federally funded program requiring 
matching funds, designed to improve the provision of social 
services by means of in-service training programs. The federal 
government would fund 75 percent of the total cost. The Univer- 
sity had been meeting with representatives of the Executive 
Office of Human Services since last spring in an attempt to 
explore the possibility of cooperating in the development of pro- 
grams for the professional staffs of state social service agencie 
and service providers. Universities in other states, he said, 
had received substantial federal grants for assisting in such 
programs . 



President Wood explained that the initial proposal was 
developed during a series of very complicated and extended discus- 
sions between the Department of Public Welfare and the Institute tor 
Governmental Services of the University and had been broken down 



Title XX 
Agreement 
(Doc. T78-028) 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

into two basic parts: first, the capacity of the University to 
provide the educational services and the benefits to the Univer- 
sity from the provision of these services; and second, the break- 
down of costs with relation to the benefits received. The initia 
proposal from the Office of Human Services, he said, was that the 
University assume responsibility for the total match. This had 
not seemed appropriate to University personnel. The University 
had been willing to assume the total match for the first year, 
but it was felt that in future years the cost of the match should 
be shared by the appropriate state agencies who would be the majoj: 
beneficiaries of the undertaking. The proposal had been dis- 
cussed at the October meeting of the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy. 

Vice President Lynton added to President Wood's comments 
emphasizing the significance of the fact that the Department of 
Public Welfare had for the first time specifically turned to the 
University to ask it to take a major role in the development of 
such a program. The University would take charge of the develop- 
ment of the appropriate curriculum and workshops and the content 
of the training and education, and be responsible for the coordin 
tion of the eventual delivery of the various programs. The thrus 
of the discussions, he said, had been on resources and on close 
collaboration with the other segments of public higher education. 
The benefits are: 1) the state agencies would receive assistance 
over the years through the improvement in skills and understandin 
of many thousands of state employees who provide the particular 
services, and 2) the University would be working toward one of 
its goals, its mission to be of service to the Commonwealth, 
while at the same time acquiring additional expertise in the de- 
velopment of the delivery of human and social services curricula. 
An added advantage is that the federal government would provide 
most of the funding. This federal legislation has been in effect 
since 1974, and it is expected to continue for some time in the 
future, providing a long-range means for supporting and expanding 
programs in this field. The University, he said, would cooperate 
with other state educational institutions in the providing of 
these services, thus increasing areas of cooperative effort. 

Mr. Lynton said that in developing the terms of the 
potential agreement, the University had been guided by three 
principal considerations: 1) that the enterprise be conducted 
with no net cost to the University either direct or indirect, 
2) that whatever programs are established be of a quality worthy 
of the Univeristy, and 3) a clear designation be made of who 
would be responsible for the overall management function. 

In order to handle the oversight of such a complex pro- 
gram, involving not only many different colleges and schools of 
the University, but also other institutions, the President, Mr. 
Lynton said, had appointed a Steering Committee consisting of 
personnel from the central administrative offices and campus 



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administrative and academic departments as well as representatives 
of the Institute for Governmental Services. He then introduced 
Arthur Eve, Associate Director of the Institute for Governmental 
Services. Mr. Eve explained briefly the extent and location of 
the Institute and what controls were in place to monitor its var- 
ious programs. The Director of the Institute, he said, worked 
from the central administrative offices, and there were offices 
also at 100 Arlington Street as well as on the Amherst campus. 
The Business Manager, he said, was Maureen Kolakoski, who he then 
introduced. The Institute, he said, handled grants and contracts 
from the federal and state governments as well as from independen 
agencies. It had handled multi-year contracts similar to the 
proposed contract for Title XX, although not of such magnitude, 
and it had centralized business management. This function, he 
said, operated in conjunction with the regular University manage- 
ment control systems. Although the Title XX Agreement would be 
a larger contract than had been previously negotiated, he said, 
he felt the control mechanisms already in existence would ensure 
fiscal accountability. 

Trustees then asked specific questions with regard to 
the control mechanisms and the potential risks. Trustee Dennis 
said he was concerned about how the matching funds would be pro- 
vided and how the indirect costs would be determined. Mr. Hester 
explained that the indirect costs were fixed at a given rate and 
that this rate could not be adjusted either up or down retro- 
actively. However, he said, it was possible that in the future 
a new rate could be established. He said the University could 
live within the 75 percent reimbursement the first year, but 
would require a higher reimbursement in future years. This addi- 
tional funding would have to be provided by other state agencies 
or by appropriation. Trustee Marks asked if subcontractors were 
used, what controls would be available to govern their activities. 
Chairman Crain said he agreed with Trustee Marks that it was ex- 
tremely important that fiscal controls were adequate to handle a 
project of this magnitude. 



President Wood said it was necessary to let the Executive 
Office of Human Services know whether the University was interested 
in participating in the project. Unless the University gave an 
indication that it was interested, he said, it was possible that 
the EOHS would look elsewhere for assistance. He said that until 
it was determined that the University was seriously considering 
cooperating in the project, detailed programs and budgets could 
not be developed. Mr. Lynton noted that timing was important 
because of the need to hire faculty and develop curricula. Pres- 
ident Wood said the Board had three options: 1) it could advise 
the EOHS that the University was interested in cooperating on 
the project but needed additional time to consider the fiscal 
arrangements, say until December, or 2) it could take a condition- 
al vote at this time, giving authority to the Committee on Budget 
and Finance to approve the agreement after further review, or 
3) it could advise the EOHS that the University was not in a 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

position to go ahead on the project at this time. 

After further discussion about funding and fiscal 
controls, it was the sense of the meeting that the programs 
had merit and that the University should try to find ways to par- 
ticipate, but that more information was necessary about costs and 
controls before the Committee would be in a position to recommend 
approval of the agreement. It was agreed that additional informa 
tion would be furnished to the Committee on Budget and Finance at 
its next meeting. It was noted that this delay should not be 
construed in a negative way, but simply as an indication that 
there were some concerns about the financial arrangements. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize the President on behalf of the 
University of Massachusetts to enter into 
an agreement for FY 1978 with the Secretary 
of the Executive Office of Human Services 
and the Commissioner of the Department of 
Public Welfare for the delivery of education- 
al and training programs pursuant to Title XX 
of the Social Security Act, as more fully 
described in T78-028, subject to further re- 
view by the Committee on Budget and Finance. 

There being no further business, at 10:15 a.m. the 
meeting was adjourned. 




ZuJbuL, 



Dorothy Eictjel 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

November 16, 19 77; 2:00 p.m. 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Crain; President Wood; 
Trustees Dennis, Marks, Spiller, and Troy; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Other Trustees : Trustee Batiste; Mr. Callahan representing 
Trustee Anrig 

Absent Committee Members : Trustee Gordon 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mr. Brand, Acting Treasurer; Ms. Hanson, Budget Director 
and Associate Vice President; Mr. Hester, Associate Vice Presiden 
for Business Services; Ms. Taylor, Assistant Director, Office of 
the Budget; Mr. Weston, Executive Assistant for Management and 
Business Affairs 

Institute for Governmental Services : Mr. Eve, Associate Director 
Ms. Kolakoski, Business Manager 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student Af- 
fairs; Mr. Averill, Director, University Health Services; Mr. 
Beatty, Director, Office of Budgeting and Institutional Studies; 
Mr. Bishop, Director, Procurement Office; Mr. DeNyse, Director 
of Personnel and Financial Services 

UM/Boston : Mr. Baxter, Vice Chancellor for Administration and 
Finance 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger, Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor 
for Administration and Finance; Dr. Fulmer, Associate Dean for 
Primary Care; Ms. McGowan, Director, Uxbridge Project; Mr. Schiff 
Director of Procurement 

Guests : Ms. Shukri, Office of Educational Affairs; Messrs. 
Wilkins and Parker, Investment Counsels, Standish, Ayer and Wood, 
Inc . 

The meeting was called to order at 2:05 p.m. Mr. 
Parker opened the discussion on Divestment of South African Stock 
(Doc. T78-030) with a few remarks about the state of the 
economy. While the economy appeared to be slowing down, none 
of the signs normally associated with a recession were evident: 
inventory /sales ratios were low rather than high; corporate 
dollar holdings were high, and most importantly, investors were 
acting in a cautious manner. While there were problems, he 



Divestment 
of South 
African Stock 
(Doc. T78-030) 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

looked forward to an increase in business activity in the coming 
months. If this expectation was not realized, it was apparent 
that the federal government would take remedial action. Mr. 
Wilkins added that the current prices of some stocks were un- 
realistic in view of their income potential. Therefore, it was 
recommended that the Trustees continue to emphasize common stocks 
in the portfolio rather than fixed income investments such as 
bonds . 

In the matter of the proposed divestment/reinvestment, 
Mr. Parker said, a list of all U.S. companies doing business in 
South Africa had been compiled from data supplied by the South 
African government. It was recommended that the Board divest 
holdings in twenty companies , of which nineteen had been on the 
original list compiled by the Ad Hoc Committee on South African 
Investments. In compiling the list of stocks recommended for 
purchase, efforts had been made to ensure that the diversification 
of the portfolio would be much the same as before. 

The divestment, Mr. Parker continued, was expected to 
raise about $621,000; the stocks to be sold yielded an income of 
4.7 percent, or $29,839. The proposed reinvestment of $600,000 
would yield 3.5 percent, or $21,652. Trustee Spiller said he 
wished to ask a few questions for the record. First, did Invest- 
ment Counsel consider the stocks on the "buy" list to be of equal 
quality to those on the "sell" list? Mr. Parker replied that he 
had tried very hard to recommend stocks of equal quality and felt 
that he had done so. Second, asked Trustee Spiller, would in- 
vestment counsel have made the same recommendations if he had beeb. 
expressing a free opinion and had not been operating under a 
directive to divest certain kinds of stock? Mr. Wilkins said 
that in certain regards the recommendations would have been the 
same. If not operating under a directive, Standish Ayer might 
have been more selective. Trustee Spiller said the recommendatioh 
would result in a loss of about $50,000 in the value of the endow 
ment funds, and a yearly loss of about $8,000 in income. Given 
a free investment decision, asked Trustee Spiller, would the 
recommendation have been the same? Trustee Spiller said he 
realized he was asking tough questions, but for a reason. The 
recommendation, which would result in an encroachment on endowment 
funds, stemmed from an emotional decision taken by the Board, 
and did not fully speak to the proper use of the funds. Mr. 
Wilkins said that if the primary criteria set by the Board had 
been to recommend a program that would not cut income, the re- 
commendation before the Committee would not be the same. 



Trustee Troy asked if the yearly loss in income would 
be a continuing loss. Mr. Parker said that in compiling the "buy 
list, efforts had been made to pick companies that were growing 
at a faster rate that industry in general, which should in time 



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offer a better than average rate of income increase. Chairman 
Crain said it should be remembered that it was the will of the 
Board that divestiture should happen. What was before the Com- 
mittee was a proposal that would accomplish this, and do so in the; 
specified time. There was no further discussion, and it was 
moved and seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the Associate Treasurer of the University, 
Robert H. Brand, to execute the sale and purchase 
of securities for the Endowment Fund Portfolio 
as contained in Doc. T78-030, Exhibit III. 

Trustee Spiller voted against the motion. 

Regarding the agenda item, Transfer of Funds , Ms. 
Hanson said the transfer was needed to pay for the recently con- 
cluded study of discretionary funds. After a brief discussion 
it was moved and seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

authorize the President to transfer $3,000 
from account 205905 to account 205510. 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Revision 
of Valley Health Plan — UM/Amherst. Ms. Hanson said the revision 
would allow employees of the Commonwealth who were already 
eligible under the HMO Plan to use the University Health Center 
as well as the Amherst Medical Associates care site. The re- 
vision did not make any essential changes in the previous HMO 
contract, and would result in a more effective use of the Univer- 
sity Health Center. 

Trustee Batiste asked if the students would be sub- 
sidizing additional personnel if the revision were approved. Mr. 
Averill said no additional personnel would be needed and that the 
proposal would work to the students' benefit. The income from the 
increased membership would garner the Student Health Trust Fund 
$40,000 for the contract year, or $26,000 for the fiscal year. 
The revision would not affect the dental service as VHP members 
were not eligible for this service. There was no further dis- 
cussion and it was moved and seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees amend the 
previous Trustee vote of April 7, 1976 to read 
as follows : 

"VOTED: To authorize the Acting Treasurer of the 
University to enter into a contract or 
contracts with the Valley Health Plan Inc. , 
a Health Maintenance Organization, and 
Independent Practices Associates, Inc., a 
private medical group practice, to establis 



Transfer of 
Funds 



UM/Amherst — 
Revision of 
Valley Health 
Plan (HMO) 



-3- 



B&F 
11/16/77 



Title XX 
Agreement 
(Doc. T78-028) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

an HMO through which Commonwealth employees 
and their dependents may receive comprehen- 
sive health care services on a prepaid basis. 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Title XX 
Agreement . The Committee's last discussion of the Title XX 
Agreement had raised questions about two basic issues — the 
arrangements within the Institute for Governmental Services to 
manage the Agreement, and the issue of indirect cost recovery 
versus out-of-pocket expenses. The Committee had since received 
documents addressing both issues. 

The University, Mr. Hester said, had not officially 
negotiated a new indirect cost rate for some five years. There- 
fore, despite an increase in such costs, the University's reim- 
bursement had remained at a flat rate. It would need to address 
the indirect cost rate issue very soon. The Trusteees , Mr. 
Hester continued, had legitimate interest in maximizing the re- 
turn of indirect cost recovery; however, this interest should be 
tempered by faculty concern that a major increase in the indirect 
cost rate might cause a sort of shock wave at funding agencies. 
For this reason a careful path would have to be charted, and 
there would have to be a great deal of negotiation, both with the 
campuses and within the campuses. 

With regard to the specific issue of Title XX, Trustee 
Dennis recalled that at the last meeting he had asked how firm 
the indirect cost rate for the Title XX agreement was, particular- 
ly in light of a statement that the recovery would be greater thaji 
the actual overhead expenditure and that this excess could be 
used as part of the matching funds. Mr. Hester explained that 
some of the very confusing language in Title XX had to do with 
the fact that what was being discussed was neither a match nor 
cost sharing, but was an "in-kind contribution." While limited 
administrative staff might be added to the Offices of the President 
and Chancellors because of the Agreement, a certain portion of 
the time of current administrators would be counted as such a 
contribution. This explained the statement that the University 
had "attributable" costs which greatly exceed its out-of-pocket 
expenses. This could be expressed by saying that the University' 
in-kind contribution, making up the needed 25 percent, would 
be composed in part of the time devoted to the program by a 
variety of current administrative staff for which the University 
chose to waive collecting the appropriate portion of salaries 
through indirect cost recovery. 

Trustee Dennis said his final question had to do with 
the auditing of the indirect cost rate itself. Mr. Hester said 
the rate might well be audited, but because of the roll-forward 
provision, the University would not be faced with the situation 
of having HEW say that in FY78 the University recovered more 
indirect costs than it should have, and therefore must rebate a 
certain number of dollars. Instead, HEW could at the time of 
the audit deduct any adjustment from future year's overhead. 



I 



Title XX 
Agreement 
(Doc. T78-028) 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Hester reminded the Trustees that the Board had 
been sent a document which showed a range of indirect cost re- 
covery in the second year of the Agreement. The figure of 
$1,600,000 was based on the present indirect cost rate. The 
lower figure in the document was determined by discounting the 
recovery by 20 percent. In the projection for FY80 a further 
20 percent was discounted. It was on the basis of these dis- 
counts that the University at this time did not guarantee more 
than 10 percent in-kind contribution in the second and third 
years. DPW at this time could not guarantee more than 5 percent. 
However, it was agreed that each side would try to supply further 
commitments. At the moment, however, the Trustees were asked to 
approve University participation only for the first year. In 
subsequent years DPW had agreed in writing to a shared responsi- 
bility for the public in-kind contribution. Chairman Crain said 
this commitment was crucial. It had been his experience that if 
any agency receiving training from a central group made no firm 
commitment and did not develop a proprietary interest in the use 
of the materials, the instinct to resist change would preclude 
the use of the materials. Thus, he personally was anxious to 
see DPW involved in the overhead figure, he said, and wanted to 
underscore that it would be a tremendous undertaking to get 
geographically distributed agencies to standardize to the degree 
that centralized training presupposes. 

Trustee Marks said he wished to thank the staff for the 
speed and thoroughness with which they had responded to the con- 
cerns of the Committee. He found the methodology and system 
set up for monitoring the financial and fiduciary aspects of the 
grant to be satisfactory. He then asked, given that the program 
had Board approval, if there were any other items to be negotiatec 
for the first year. Mr. Lynton said that except for details of 
phrasing, substantial agreement had been reached on all matters. 
Mr. Lynton said the University would own copyright on curriculum 
materials and would retain title to 50 percent of any equipment 
acquired. 

President Wood said he had asked for a letter of commit- 
ment from the Commissioner of Public Welfare. In the course of 
negotiating and discussing with the DPW aspects of the Agreement 
several things had become clear: the extremely tight budget 
situations of both the DPW and the Department of Public Health 
made it impossible for them to extend their five percent con- 
tribution to the overhead costs into year one; the real desire 
of DPW to see the program work; the recognition of how much such 
a program was needed; and the conviction that the program would 
lead them out of the dark ages. 

Trustee Marks said the State and Community Colleges 
already had courses in place applicable to the program. He asked 
if the plans to use these resources in the program on a sub- 
contracting basis remained unchanged. Mr. Lynton said it was 



B&F 
11/16/77 



•5- 



B&F 
11/16/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the hope and intention of everyone to develop an umbrella contract 
in years two and three between the DPW and the University, under 
which substantially everything the State and Community Colleges 
did would be coordinated by the University through subcontracts. 
During year one, because of the time element, DPW would make some 
direct grants and contracts with the Colleges; however, the 
University would participate in this process. In-kind contribu- 
tion requirements would be passed along to the State and Community 
Colleges as part of any subcontracting. 

Questions asked by Trustee Troy clarified that staff for 
the project would be hired only for the duration of the Agreement. 
There would be, in effect, two kinds of hiring: the Institute for 
Governmental Services would engage a management staff and the 
participating units of the University would hire program staff. 
Existing faculty would be utilized, as much as possible, and 
adjunct faculty would be hired to fill any resultant gaps in the 
regular programs of the units. 

Trustees Marks and Troy raised questions about the trans- 
fer of certain employees from temporary to permanent positions 
and about the possible impact of the Title XX project on the 
priorities of the University. President Wood said that the Univer 
sity, in all of its actions involved in the project, had to ensure 
that it maintained flexibility in regard to its priorities and 
that the University, in its dealings with the other participating 
institutions, had a substantial measure of quality control. 
Trustee Troy asked if there was a danger that the project would 
bring enrollment at the College of Public and Community Service 
into conflict with the Trustee mandated limits on expansion. Mr. 
Lynton said the steering committee of the project would monitor 
its impact on the C.P.C.S. and UM/Boston as a whole, one of the 
steering committee's charges being to control the extent of the 
University's involvement. Chairman Crain noted that, if most of 
the delivery of training would be at institutions other than the 
University, this would serve as another control factor. There 
was no further discussion and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize the President on behalf of the 
University of Massachusetts to enter into an 
agreement for FY 1978 with the Secretary of 
the Executive Office of Human Services and the 
Commissioner of the Department of Public Wel- 
fare for the delivery of educational and 
training programs pursuant to Title XX of the 
Social Security Act, as more fully described in 
T78-028. 

Chairman Crain said that the Committee would maintain 
its interest in this sensitive and complex project and would 
like to be kept informed of developments. Mr. Lynton suggested 
that a joint meeting of the Budget and Finance and Faculty and 
Educational Policy Committees be held in the Spring of 1978, at 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

which time a report would be presented. 

The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Athletic 
Trust Fund and Student Room Deposit Trust Fund — UM/Amherst. 



B&F 
11/16/77 



I 



Chairman Crain noted that Mr. Beatty had supplied the Committee 
with two packets of material dealing in great detail with these 
funds. In the matter of the Athletic Trust Fund, Mr. Beatty said, 
he had been asked to indicate what personnel, including coaches, 
were paid from the Athletic Trust Fund and the legal basis for the 
fund. In the attempt to answer the latter question, diligent 
searches had been conducted by his office and by the Secretary's 
Office. Neither search uncovered a definite date when the Fund 
was started; however, it was learned that it dated back to at 
least 1913. Also, the fees supporting the Fund were last increased 
in 1960; and in 1965, $8 of the fee was earmarked to pay for the 
debt service and utilities of the stadium. 



The names of all personnel paid from the Athletic Trust 
Fund, Mr. Beatty continued, were in the list supplied to the 
Committee. Included were female and male athletic coaches, mostly 
part-time, and an administrative support staff. Salaries for 
FY78 would total $177,479; additional major expenditures would be 
$287,163 for supplies and equipment; $80,000 for debt service on 
the stadium; and $20,000 for utilities for the stadium. As to the 
Student Room Deposit Trust Fund, Mr. Beatty said he believed the 
auditor's track supplied to be self-exlanatory . 

Mr. Beatty said there were several other issues his 
office would have to deal with in the near future. The first was 
the Residence Halls Audit and Report. The Board had requested 
this report when it last raised residence hall fees. Mr. Beatty 
said the report would be presented to the next meeting. Also 
being prepared for the same meeting was a response to the Peat, 
Marwick & Mitchell audits. The other impending issues were the 
FY79 budget and fees, the FY80 budget request, and the need to 
deal with the problems of the Campus Center. 



UM/Amherst — 
Athletic and 
Student Room 
Deposit 
Trust Funds 



I 



The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Small 
Business/Minority Purchasing Program . Mr. Hester reminded the 
Committee that at the April meeting, the Board had received a 
presentation detailing the special handling steps within the 
campus business offices which would be accorded to small/minority 
business firms. Certain goals had been set forth, such as de- 
velopment of a vendor's manual and identification of minority/ 
small business vendors — as had a target for an annual expenditure 
of $750,000 to such vendors, $300,000 of which was to be with 
minority-owned businesses. In approving the program, Mr. Hester 
continued, the Board had asked to receive quarterly progress re- 
ports. The report now at hand was the first of these. The re- 
port showed the great effort put forth in starting up the program-- 
for example, the development of the vendor's manual — and detailed 



Small Business/ 
Minority 
Purchasing 
Program 



-7- 



B&F 
11/16/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

some of the problems encountered. Mr. Hester, noting that Trustee 
Dennis had been the prime mover and continuing motivator of the 
program, asked for his comments. 

Trustee Dennis said that good work had been done on the 
start up of the program; however, his chief interest was in actua] 
purchases to date. He said he wished to applaud the efforts of 
Boston and Worcester in this regard. Possibly the success 
achieved by these two campuses was partly due to the relatively 
larger number of minority businessmen in the eastern part of the 
state. However, when he saw that Amherst had spent $432 in 
business with minority firms out of a total of upwards of a 
million dollars he was somewhat upset. Mr. Hester said it should 
be noted that this reflected a two-stage data problem. Given the 
size, complexity, and decentralization of the purchasing process 
at Amherst, there was difficulty in collecting data, for example, 
from the auxiliary enterprises. Further, because of the larger 
number of minority vendors in the eastern part of the state, a 
deliberate decision had been made to compile the certified 
minority vendors' list by first identifying qualified vendors in 
the Boston/Worcester areas, and then supplementing the list with 
vendors located in the western part of the state. In the quarter 
under review, Amherst may well have made large purchases from 
minority/small businesses; however, these businesses may not yet 
have been identified and certified because of the staged process 
in which the list was being compiled. 

Trustee Dennis said he understood the problems 
associated with collecting the data; however, these problems 
should have been worked out. Despite this, he said, he wished 
to state for the record that he was disappointed with the Amherst 
performance. He said he hoped the problems would be worked out 
and that the performance would improve in the second quarter. 

Mr. Bishop asked leave to address the issue. He said 
that the logistics on the Amherst Campus were so large as to 
make comparisons with the other campus deceptive. Each year, 
the Purchasing Office processed about 50,000 purchase orders and 
5,000 bids. Given the volume of purchasing, a staff of two 
buyers and a manual system, it was difficult to identify qualified 
vendors. What the Purchasing Office had been trying to do, during 
the first quarter start up, was to create a system to identify 
small/minority vendors. The campus had contacted about 400 
businesses to determine their eligibility; a listing from the 
Boston area was being used, and Amherst had solicited information 
from still other businesses. Responses were coming, and the vendor 
list would soon be complete. 

Another factor, Mr. Bishop continued, was that there 
had been a delay in loading the Amherst budgets into the computer 
Thus the information supplied to the Committee was essentially 
a report for the month of September rather than a quarterly repor : 
Within the last week staff members had analyzed about one-half 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of the purchase orders and an amended report would show that 
Amherst had purchased over $50,000 worth of goods from certified 
small/minority businesses. By estimating the total yet to be 
abstracted from the first quarter and projecting this through 
the second quarter it would be seen that Amherst would spend some 
$180,000 in business with eligible vendors; this represented 24 
percent of the University target figure. Mr. Bishop concluded 
by noting that the dollar amounts for Amherst were accounts 
paid and did not include encumbrances. Boston and Worcester in- 
cluded both payments and encumbrances. 

Chairman Crain then said that there were two updates on 
items of interest to the Committee — Common Services allocations 
and the Tri-River Family Health Center. 

President Wood reminded the Committee that after it had 
approved the FY78 operating budget, there had been a discussion 
of the levels of allocations within the budget and what Univer- 
sity policy obtained in these matters. Policy had always been 
to have as a budget, as approved by the Trustees, the maximum 
allowable; and to undertake to make all the savings and all the 
economies and all possible adjustments to changing circumstances 
within the numbers. However, in terms of allocations of the 
budget and reserves , the budget process was to allocate in terms 
of the vote of the Board. Accordingly, in view of the discussion 
by the Committee concerning Common Services, he had sent a 
memorandum to the three Chancellors, reaffirming the policy. He 
said he wanted it known that he would make the same recommendation 
to the Interim President for the FY80 budget. 



The Committee then heard a brief report on the Tri-River Tri-River 



B&F 
11/16/77 



Common 

Services 

Allocations 



Family Health Care Center. President Wood said the Center had 
first been discussed at the Health Affairs Committee meeting of 
April 27, 1977. Programmatically , it was another of the Medical 
School's moves into family practice and clinical services. He 
said the pulling together of such a complicated program was time 
consuming because it often involved the schedule of outside 
parties, e.g., the federal government. It had been hoped to 
bring this proposal to the Committee earlier; however, two major 
issues — the character of the funding and the design of the 
facility — had to be satisfactorily resolved before bringing the 
vote to the Board. 

Chancellor Bulger said the Center would offer primary 
care to the only area in the state which had been officially de- 
signated by the federal government as being medically under- 
served. Also unique was the fact that the community had asked 
the University to establish the center, with full knowledge that 
the center would be part of the Medical School's teaching effort. 



-9- 



Family 
Health Care 
Center — Report 



B&F 
11/16/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Fulmer said that one of the original intents of the 
Medical School had been to have a family practice residence pro- 
gram in place when the first class graduated. When that class did 
graduate, two such programs were available — a rural one in Barre, 
and an inner city one in Worcester. The need for residencies in 
pediatrics and internal medicine had also been recognized, but 
these could not be established until the Teaching Hospital was 
opened. 

While awaiting the opening of the Hospital, Dr. Fulmer 
continued, sites for the additional residencies were sought. The 
search led to the Blackstone Valley, which, as Chancellor Bulger 
had stated, was one of the most underserved areas in the state. 
The Medical School had worked with the people in the Valley for 
three years in developing the plans for the proposed center. 
The plans were now complete and construction of the health center 
building could soon begin. 

Within the past month, Dr. Fulmer said, notification 
of the award of four grants had been received. One, in the amount 
of $500,000, was to help support residencies in primary care 
medicine and pediatrics; another was for undergraduate training. 
Both grants were based on the availability of a model health care 
delivery unit in an underserved region. The other two grants would 
directly support the proposed Tri-River Health Center. 

Ms. McGowan said a total of $450,000 had been received 
from the Kellogg Foundation and the Department of Health, Educa- 
tion and Welfare. These funds would be adequate to supply needed 
equipment and would more than cover the anticipated operating 
deficit in the first few years. Further support for the Center 
came from the community itself. A fund drive for capital ex- 
penses had been conducted and land for the center had been donatec 
by a private individual. 

Most of the steps necessary to begin had been taken, 
Ms. McGowan said; however, the project would be on a tight schedule 
since the Kellogg and HEW monies were contingent upon the center 
being operational by August 31, 1978. Also, the agreements be- 
tween the University and the Tri-River Corporation had yet to be 
finalized. These should be completed shortly. 



Chairman Crain said it was apparent from the data 
available that the Center would fill a real need. He cautioned 
that the arrangement of having the community corporation construct: 
the building and then lease it to the University for twenty-five 
years, if not handled properly, could be seen as an attempt to 
end run the capital outlay requirements of the state. President 
Wood agreed with this cautionary note and said that he wanted to 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

make clear that was not in any way the intent, but rather the Uni- 
versity was taking part in a unique cooperative effort. Also, 
while the Tri-River Corporation was responsible for the construc- 
tion of the building, the Trustees and the staff would ensure that 
the University's agreed upon approval of the building plans was 
fully exercised. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting adjourned at 4:00 p.m. 




Dorothy Eicl 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 



B&F 
11/16/77 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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NOT USED 



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ATTENDANCE 



1 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 



December 1, 1977; 1:30 p.m. 

Office of the President 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Spiller; President Wood, 
Interim President-Designate Patterson; Trustees Burack, Kassler 
and Romer; Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop; Treasurer 
Brand; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Dennis and McNulty 



Other Trustees: Trustees Baker and Batiste 



Central Administration : Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Plan- 
ning; Mr. Brigham, Senior University Planner; Mr. Meehan, Con- 
sultant to the Planning Office; Ms. Rosen, Associate Counsel 

JM/ Amherst : Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student 
f fairs; Mr. Littlefield, Director of Planning 



* 



UM/Boston : Mr. Baxter, Vice Chancellor for Administration and 
Finance; Mr. Prince, Director of Planning; Mr. Strange, Dean, 
College of Public and Community Service; Professor Martin, Fac- 
ulty Representative 



UM/Wo 



rcester : Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor for Administration 



and Finance; Ms. McGowen, Coordinator, Tri-River Family Health 
Center 

The meeting came to order at 1:40 p.m. Chairman 
Spiller called for discussion on Tri-River Family Health Center 

Construction and Proposed Lease (Doc. T78-036) . Mr. Brigham 
said the proposed Health Center building would be built and owned 
by the Tri-River Family Health Center Development Corporation, 
which would lease the building to the University for a period of 
;25 years. The construction agreement provided for a process in 
which the Development Corporation would perform those functions 
normally discharged by the Buildings and Grounds Committee and the 
planning staff — for example, the examination and approval of 
drawings at various stages. However, these approvals were subject 
|to the concurrence of the Medical Center and review by the Plan- 
ning Office. 

The building, Mr. Brigham continued, was an extremely 
sound, well designed building. At this stage there were a few 
technical details yet to be worked out, none of which were of 



Tri-River 
Family Health 
Center Con- 
struction 
and Proposed 
Lease 
(Doc. T78-036) 



B&G 
12/1/77 



Memorandum of 
Understand- 
ings with 
JFK Library 
and General 
Services 
Admini- 
stration 



UM/Boston 
Naming of 
the Physi- 
cal Educa- 
tion Build- 
ing 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

substance or would warrant any serious question. 

Mr. Campbell said the building was a single story 
-milding of Class Four construction, with an area of 6,400 square 
:eet. The building would be electrically heated, as this had 
been determined to be most economical, and would accommodate some 
150 ambulatory patients per day, or about 25,000 per year. The 

eographic area to be served comprised seven towns with a popu- 

ation of 42,000. 

Trustee Kassler said that the Committee should consider 
dding a statement to the proposed Agreement to the effect that 
he review and approval procedures did not constitute acceptance 
f the building and waiver of the University's rights to claims 
gainst the contractor or the architect. After a brief dis- 
ussion it was agreed that because the building would not be 
wned by the Univeristy this would not be necessary; however, the 
.ease would be drawn so that all of the University's rights would 
\>e protected. 

There was no further discussion and it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the preliminary plans and specifications for 
the construcion of a building for the Tri-River 
Family Health Center in Uxbridge, Massachusetts 
and authorize the President and Chancellor of 
the Medical Center to approve the final plans 
and construction of the building as outlined 
in the Construction Agreement included in Trustee 
Doc. T78-036. 

The Committee then discussed Memorandum of Understandings 



I 



with JFK Library and General Services Administration. President 



Wood said that the Board in June, 1977, had authorized him to 
i^nter into a series of grants of easements and agreements with 
:he JFK library and the G.S.A. The three parties had now drawn 
up a Memorandum of Understandings which outlined the various 
arrangements that had been agreed upon in the interest of equit- 
able operations and harmony between the two institutions. This 
item was for the Trustees' information and no action was necessary, 

The next item was Naming of the Physical Education 
building — UM/Boston. Chairman Spiller said that Chancellor 



Golino had recommended that the new physical education facility 
)e named after Trustee Clark. He said he thought this recom- 
mendation did not require discussion. It was moved, seconded and 
iinanimously 

VOTED: To recommend that the Board of Trustees name the 
then new physical education building of the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Catherine Forbes Clark Physical Education Center, 
in recognition of Mrs. Clark's substantial con- 
tribution to the University and her particular 
concern with developing a constructive partner- 
ship between the Harbor Campus and the Dorchester 
Community (Doc. T78-033) . 

The Committee then discussed Option to Purchase Murray 
D. Lincoln Land in Ohio (Doc. T78-034) . Mr. Brand said the 



1 



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Jniversity had been attempting unsuccessfully to sell this land 
since 1970. A hospital in Columbus, Ohio, had expressed an 
interest in the land and had asked for an option to purchase. 
Afhile the option would be in force longer than was usual and the 
option payment was not very generous, it was the first tangible 
Offer to buy received in seven years. There was little discus- 
sion and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the Acting Treasurer to negotiate and to sign 
an option with St. Ann's Hospital in Columbus, 
Ohio, for the sale of a parcel of University 
land in Columbus as described in Trustee Doc. 
T78-034, on terms he deems financially prudent 
and consistent with the early disposition of 
this land, subject to review by the President 
and the General Counsel of the University. 

The Committee then discussed Renovation Plans/UMass 
Marine Station, Hodgkins Cove, Gloucester . President Wood said 
that the Hodgkins Cove station had been long established and the 
proposed renovations were part of a plan to re-invigorate what 
was potentially one of the University's more exciting activities. 
A capital outlay for the renovation had been appropriated in 
L975. 

Mr. Brigham said that the proposed renovation would 
more than double the usable area of the present facility, adding 
p,300 square feet to the present 3,200 square feet. Most of the 
new space would be devoted to two large laboratory areas which 
would make possible more flexible use of the building. In addi- 
ion, improvements to the sanitation and docking facilities were 
omtemplated. Mr. Brigham concluded by noting that the capital 
outlay totalled $360,000 while the estimated cost of the renovatioiji 
Was $430,000. There were contingency plans available to deal 
with this possible shortfall. 

After a brief discussion it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve the 
preliminary plans and specifications for the con- 
struction of an addition and related site improve- 
ments for the University of Massachusetts Marine 
Station at Hodgkins Cove, Gloucester, and to 
authorize approval of bidding documents based 



-3- 



B&G 
12/1/77 



Option to 
Purchase 
Murray D. 
Lincoln Land 
in Ohio 
(Doc. T78-034) 



Renovation 
Plans/UMass 
Marine Sta- 
tion, Hodg- 
kins Cove 
Gloucester 



B&G 
12/1/77 



UM/ Amherst 
Lease Agree- 
ment Between 
Appalachian 
Mountain Club 
and Student 
Government 
Association 
(Doc. T78-037) 

100 Arling- 
ton Street 
Renovation 
Plans and 
Schedule 
and Management 
Responsibility 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

on these plans and specifications by the President 
or his designee. 

The Committee then discussed Lease Agreement Between 
Appalachian Mountain Club and Student Government Association — 



I 



UM/Amherst (Doc. T78-037) . This was a proposal that the S.G.A. 
lease property in Boston to serve as the headquarters of a fledg- 
jLing organization which, when organized, would be known as the 
Massachusetts State Student Association. After a brief discussion, 
It was agreed that the S.G.A. should re-think the proposal. 

The meeting then discussed Renovation Plans and Schedule 



and Management Responsibility — 100 Arlington Street . President 
food said that he had asked the Planning Office to consider two 
concepts in planning the renovation of 100 Arlington. One was 
:hat of considering the building as the site of most Board activ- 
ities — that is, full Board meetings, committee meetings, etc. 
The other was to include the option of retaining the practice of 
rotating Board meetings from campus to campus. Both options 
tfould have cost and conceptual implications which the Trustees 
|^ould wish to consider. Another matter was the management of the 
uilding, once renovated. Ms. Robinson said that the Committee 
should know that some sixty applications had been received from 
!/ery able firms. The Designer Selection Board would select the 
iinalist within a week. 

Chairman Spiller asked if there were other matters that 
iad to be addressed. Ms. Robinson said there was one — the matter 
}f whether space should be provided on the thirteenth floor for 
iull Board meetings. This could be done, but it would be costly 
joth in terms of money and space. There was an auditorium on the 
second floor which, with some renovation, could accommodate full 
Board meetings. Chairman Spiller asked which alternative would 
De preferred. Ms. Robinson said that use of the second floor 
eemed preferable. Trustee Kassler said he and Trustee Crain had 
visited the building and had agreed that a room large enough for 
i full Board meeting on the thirteenth floor seemed unnecessary. 
The room on the second floor seemed adequate. 

Mr. Strange said that if the Trustees did decide to use 
:he second floor auditorium (the only large classroom in the 
building) as a meeting room, then careful coordination with the 
]ollege of Public and Community Service would have to be worked 
out. Chairman Spiller said that this would be done. 

There was no further discussion and it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the schematic plans for the renovations at 100 
Arlington Street as shown in Doc. T78-035 and 
management arrangements appropriate thereto 
and to authorize the Committee on Buildings 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and Grounds to act for the Board in any approvals 
required before the February meeting of the Board, 

There was no further business to come before the 
Committee and the meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 



B & G 
12/1/77 




Dorothy Eichel 
Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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MINUTES OF JOINT MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL 
POLICY AND COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

December 1, 1977; 3:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

ATTENDANCE: Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Troy; President Wood; 



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Trustees Baker, Batiste, Burack, Kassler and Romer; Mr. Callahan 
representing Trustee Anrig; Ms. Pinck representing Trustee Dukakis 
Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Breyer, Fielding, McNeil, 



Morgenthau and Shearer 

Office of the President: Mr, Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Mr. Cass, Executive Assistant to the President; Ms. Rosei 
Associate Counsel; Ms. Simmons, Ms. Veith, Ms. Weiner, Assistant 
Vice Presidents for Academic Affairs; Ms. Taylor, Assistant 
Director of the Budget 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs; Mr. Tunis, Dean of Admissions; Mr. Fitzpatrick, Director 
of Student Services 

UM/Boston : Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; Mr 



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Tubbs , Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Mr. Hartnagle, Dean 
of Admissions; Mr. Gilmore, Director of Community Relations; 
Professor Martin, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Feinblatt, Associate Dean 
and Director of Student Affairs; Dr. Coulter, Director of Admis- 
sions; Messrs. Brennan, DeMatteo, Dicker and Goldstein, Student 
Body Committee; Professor Smith, Faculty Representative 

The meeting came to order at 3:20 p.m. Chairman Troy 
called for discussion on the agenda item, Learning Contracts — 
UM/Worcester. President Wood said that learning contracts for 
medical students had been included in the FY77 Appropriations 
Act as an option for the Board of Trustees. The language had beeiji 
changed in the FY78 Act making such contracts mandatory. The 
Committees faced the task of determining the character of the pro- 
visions of the contracts. Similar contracts or agreements were 
to be found in other institutions in the state and the nation, 
and usually made provision for either a service or monetary pay- 
back. 

The legislatively mandated contracts for Worcester, the 
President continued, had to be developed quickly as initial 
acceptances to the Class of 1982 would be mailed in mid-December. 
Successful applicants would have to be informed of the service or 



UM/Worcester- 
Learning Con- 
tracts 



F&EP Comm. 
S.A. Comm. 
12/1/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

monetary obligations they would be assuming. University Counsel 
had advised that there were probable tax consequences with the 
service payback proposal. These would have to be explored further 
and might have to be brought to the attention of the Senate Ways 
and Means Committee. It was hard to believe that the Senate Com- 
mittee would have approved learning contracts if the members had 
anticipated these would lead to major tax liabilities for the 
students. The President concluded by noting that both the 
faculty and students at Worcester had misgivings about the Chancel- 
lor's recommendations for the provisions to be included in the 
learning contracts. Expressions of these misgivings had been in- 
cluded in the support material provided to the Trustees. 

Trustee Burack said she found the law to be a rather 
strange one — it seemed to create a sort of bondage for the 
students and yet there were no penalties for non-compliance. 
President Wood said it was a strange law, one which stemmed from 
a simplistic but strongly held view that students at public in- 
stitutions of higher education, particularly in professional 
schools, incurred an obligation. Mr. Cass noted that at the just 
completed session of the Legislature in discussing the Appropria- 
tions Act, two bills had been discussed. Each proposed that stu- 
dents pay full cost, that is, tuition would be determined by 
dividing the full budget of the School by the number of students. 
Among the proposed amendments to these two unsuccessful bills was 
one which would have allowed the Trustees to forgive up to 90 per- 
cent of the tuition of students who agreed to practice in the 
Commonwealth after graduation. The House then opted to restate 
the language of the FY77 Appropriations Act, which provided for a 
non-compulsory payback arrangement; however, the Senate's view 
prevailed — that is, that the payback should be compulsory. This 
happened apparently because of a presumed analogy with the payback 
imposed on Massachusetts students who received an indirect subsidy 
while attending the medical schools at Boston University, Tufts, 
Vermont and Pennsylvania. 

Chairman Troy said it was his understanding that students 
in these programs could discharge their obligations by working 
anywhere within the state, and not be beholden to work in deprived 
areas. Chancellor Bulger said that the monetary payback proposed 
was $44,400, and the service payback was either 24 or 48 months. 
Both provisions were more stringent than those in other institu- 
tions. In those institutions the students had to serve 24 months 
anywhere in the state. In the Worcester proposal if a student 
chose to work in an area designated by the Chancellor as being 
underserved, the term would be 24 months, service in undesignated 
areas would be 48 months. Chancellor Bulger said that he was 
proposing a more stringent program for two reasons — to comply 
with what he took to be the spirit of the law, and to make some 
impact on health care delivery in the underserved areas. 

Allowing that he might be mistaken, Trustee Kassler 
said the language of the FY78 Act seemed to be aimed at imposing 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the same restrictions on, or deriving the same benefits from, 
UMass students as from those at the other schools. He suggested 
that the possibility of using a broad interpretation of service 
to the Commonwealth be considered. In other words, he wanted to 
impose as few restrictions as possible. 

In the matter of tax consequences, Trustee Kassler con- 
tinued, a student who chose to discharge the obligation to the 
state by working for one year at a state hospital would, in the 
eyes of the Internal Revenue Service, have a taxable income of 
at least $44,400 (the amount of debt forgiveness) plus whatever 
salary was earned. This was a very critical matter. He asked 
if there were opinions from the Internal Revenue Service which 
would allow modifications in the Chancellor's proposal — for examp 
would it be possible for the students to declare the "income" whi 
in school rather than on completion of residency and internship r 
quirements. While this might appear to be more onerous, it would 
reduce the student's income to $11,000 per year for four years, 
and place him/her in a more favorable tax bracket. Ms. Rosen sai 
that the only relevant opinion she was aware of was one which sta 
that the forgiveness would be counted as income at the time the 
debt was forgiven. 



F&EP Coram. 
S.A. Comm. 
12/1/77 



e, 
e 



ted 



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Trustee Burack said that it was her understanding that 
the Legislature was interested in a repayment in some form, of 
monies purportedly owed to the Commonwealth. However, the pro- 
posal before the Committee spoke to a broader social purpose. Sh& 
said that she, as a Trustee, did not have the right to tell the 
students what social purpose they should fulfill in discharging 
any obligation they might owe to the Commonwealth. Mr. Lynton 
said that while the intent of the legislation was clearly a monetary 
payback, the Board could substitute a service payback, and had wid< 
discretion as to what this service payback should entail in order 
to comply with the law. In other words, the question was what 
service payback would the Legislature view as a serious alterna- 
tive to the monetary payback. 

Chancellor Bulger said that much thought had been given 
to this aspect of the problem. In line with the language of the 
law, the service payback obligation could be discharged by serving 
in any professional capacity the student chose within the borders 
of the state. In line with a presumed intent of the Legislature, 
students were encouraged to serve in medically underserved areas, 
as the length of such service was one-half that required in other 
areas. In response to Chairman Troy's question the Chancellor said 
that only one area in the state, that centering on the Blackstone 
Valley, had been declared medically underserved. 



Professor Smith said a word about the spirit of the 
faculty when writing the memorandums presented to the meeting 
might be of some use. First, the faculty had no idea of what the 
intent of the law was. As well, faculty had no data about under- 
served areas in the state and, if there were such areas, how many 



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F&EP Comm. 
S.A. Coram. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

physicians would be needed to eliminate this condition. Faculty 
was also concerned that the payback applied only to medical stu- 
| dents and that it would limit the career choices of students on 
completion of their training. Finally, the proposed service pay- 
back might have an adverse effect on hospitals in the state — this 
because the students would feel compelled to do their residencies 
and internships in-state, the hospitals, by accommodating UMass 
graduates, would be unable to attract out-of-state applicants. 
This concern had been stated by the Chiefs of Services of several 
hospitals in the state. 

Professor Smith said there was agreement among the 
faculty that within two or three years after the start of the 
service payback program, all underserved areas would be eliminates 
and thus Medical School graduates would have only the option of 
four years' service in the Commonwealth. She concluded by noting 
that faculty had been very much opposed to the proposal when it wis 
first made. Now the sentiment was to urge postponement of the re- 
quirement for a year so that all ramifications could be explored. 

Ms. Pinck asked why the monetary payback had been set 
at $11,000 per year. Chancellor Bulger said this amount equaled 
the tuition of $2,500 tuition paid by Massachusetts students at 
Tufts and Boston University plus the $8,500 subsidy paid by the 
state, less the $900 tuition paid by students at the Medical School, 
Ms. Pinck suggested that basing the payback on average medical 
school tuition costs might be worth considering. Trustee Kassler 
said that the proposal at hand seemed to be unnecessarily severe. 
He recommended that the payback be based on average tuition costs 
If the Legislature insisted on a greater payback, this would be 
considered when necessary. Trustee Burack agreed, noting her 
predilection for reasonable compliance with the law. 



Messrs. Brennan, DeMatteo, Dicker and Goldstein then 
expressed some of the concerns of the students at the Medical 
School. They noted that voluntary programs to alleviate health 
services maldistribution had a fair degree of success, mandatory 
ones failed. Eighty-five percent of the graduates of UM/Worceste 
went into low earning primary care practice — if on graduation they 
were faced with a monetary payback of some $44,000 in addition 
to the all but prohibitive start-up costs of establishing a 
practice, they would be debt-ridden for years. If they chose the 
service payback, they would be in an impossible income tax situa- 
tion. The students also noted that the proposal would have un- 
fortunate consequences on admissions at the Medical School as well 
as restricting the career and academic choices of those accepted 
to the program. 



President Wood said the student and faculty concerns 
spoke to the genuine character of the problem faced by the Trustees, 
He proposed that the Committees direct the Administration to pre- 
pare a vote for the December 7 meeting of the Board, the vote to 
reflect the concerns of the Trustees that there be reasonable 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

compliance with the law and asking that the Chairman of the Senate 
Ways and Means Committee hold a public meeting to discuss the full 
ramifications of the payback requirement. The Committees agreed 
that this should be done. 

The next agenda item was Report on Admissions and 
Financial Aid . Due to the lateness of the hour it was agreed 
that this would be discussed at a later meeting. This concluded 
the business of the joint meeting. 



F&EP Comm. 
S.A. Comm. 
12/1/77 



The Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy then 
considered the proposed Consolidation of Departments of Medicine 
and Cardiovascular Medicine — UM/Worcester (Doc. T78-030). After 



Report on 
Admission and 
Financial Aid 



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a brief discussion it was moved and seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the consolidation of the existing Departments 
of Medicine and Cardiovascular Medicine into the 
Department of Medicine as described in Doc. T78-029 



UM/Worcester 
Consolidation 
of Departments 
of Medicine and 
Cardiovascular 
Medicine 
(Doc. T78-030 



There was no further business to come before the Committ 
and the meeting adjourned at 5:05 p.m. 



ee, 




John F. Miller 

Assistant to the Secretary to 
the Board of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

December 7, 1977; 9:00 a.m. 
Room 308, Administration Building 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Crain; President Wood; 



Interim President Designate Patterson; Trustees Gordon, Marks 
and Troy; Acting Treasurer Brand; Assistant Secretary Eichel, 
recorder 

Committee Members Absent: Trustees Dennis and Spiller 



Other Trustees: Trustees Baker and McNeil; Ms. Pinck represent- 



ing Trustee Dukakis 

Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Ms. Hanson, Budget Director and Associate Vice President 
Mr. Hester, Associate Vice President for Business Services; Mr. 
Searson, General Counsel; Mr. Hogan, Controller; Ms. Rosen, 
Associate Counsel; Ms. Taylor, Assistant Budget Director; Ms. 
Veith, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Beatty, Director of the 
Office of Budgeting and Institutional studies; Mr. Jones, Dean, 
School of Engineering; Professor Brogan, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Mr. Baxter, Vice Chancellor for Administration and 
Finance 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor 
for Administration and Finance; Ms. McGowan, Administrator of the 
Tri-River Family Health Center 

The meeting came to order at 9:15 a.m. Chairman Crain 
called for discussion on the agenda item, Tri-River Family Health 
Center . Ms. Rosen said the lease for the Health Center, which 
the Committee had received had been changed to reflect a concern 
of Trustee Kassler. The change was included in the vote before 
the Committee. There was no further discussion, and it was moved 
and seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the Chancellor of the Worcester campus and the 
Associate Treasurer, Acting as Treasurer, to enter 
into lease and construction agreements for the 
Tri-River Family Health Center in Uxbridge as set 
forth in Doc. T78-036, as amended by substituting 
in Article 2.2 of the lease for the phrase "not 
to exceed twenty-five years," the following "not 
to be less than twenty years and not to exceed 
twenty-five years." 



Tri-River 
Family Health 
Center 



B&F Coram. 
12/7/77 



Staff Support 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting then turned to the agenda item, Staff Suppo 
for the Interim! for the Interim President. 
President 



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President Wood said it would be 



necessary to authorize a fund transfer in order to provide ne- 
cessary staff support for the Interim President. Professor 
Patterson said that three individuals were involved — Mr. Gilmore, 
whose duties would mainly have to do with the management of the 
Office of the President; Mr. Bondy who would be particularly con- 
cerned with campus relations, with the Trustees, and other out- 
side organizations and agencies; Ms. Judd would serve as special 
assistant. There was no further discussion, and it was moved and 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

authorize the President to transfer $14,000 
from account 205905 to account 205510. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting adjourned at 9:25 a.m. 




Jonn F. Miller 

Assistant to the Secretary to 
the Board of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

December 7, 1977; 11:00 a.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Healey ; President Wood; 
Interim President Designate Patterson; Trustees Crain, Gordon, 
Robinson and Troy; Acting Treasurer Brand; Ms. Eichel, Assistant 
SEcretary; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustees Shearer and Spiller 



Other Trustees : Trustees Baker, Breyer, Burack, Kassler, Krumsiek, 



Marks, McNeil, McNulty, Morgenthau and Romer; Mr. Callahan re- 
presenting Trustee Anrig; Mr. Parks representing Trustee Dukakis; 
Mr. Schulman representing Trustee Fielding; Mr. Colby representing 
Trustee Winthrop 

Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Ms. Hanson, Budget Director and Associate Vice President^ 
Mr. Hester, Associate Vice President for Business Services; Ms. 
Rosen, Associate Counsel 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery 



UM/Boston: Professor Martin, Faculty Representative 



Guests : Mr. Barrus , Department of Food and Agriculture 

The meeting came to order at 12:20 p.m. Speaking to th 
item, Appointment of Nominating Committee , Chairman Healey said 
he would be very happy to receive volunteers to serve on the Com- 
mittee. Names of the candidates would be presented to the speciap. 
meeting of the Board, January 11, 1978. 

The next item was Personnel Actions Implementing 
Executive Personnel Decision of the November Meeting of the Board 



The first of these was Acceptance of Resignation as of January 1 , 
1978, of President Wood and Authorization of Administrative Leave 



b Appointment of 
Nominating 
Committee 



Personnel 
Actions 



Chairman Healey said that this would in effect recommend that the 
Board accept the resignation of Robert C. Wood as President effec- 
tive January 1, 1978 and authorize administrative leave with pay 
for a period of six months, commencing on January 1, 1978. The 
Chairman said it was his understanding that Dr. Wood was resign- 
ing from the office of President but had not resigned his tenured 
faculty position as a University Professor. The recommendation 
was in line with past practice at the University and other public 
and private institutions for senior officials who served for a 
long period of time, and was an administrative leave and not a 
sabbatical. President Wood, he noted, was now in his eighth 
year as President. 



Exec. Comm. 
12/7/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At the President's request, Ms. Hanson explained the 
intent of all the votes to be acted on. She said that the first 
of the two votes concerning President Wood would accept his re- 
signation as President and would grant him an administrative 
leave with pay for a period of six months. The second vote dealt 
with a technical personnel action. In line with University practice 
when Dr. Wood was first appointed, he was appointed to the positiop 
and title of President; in addition he was appointed University 
Professor with Tenure. While a person could hold two titles at 
the same time, one could not hold two positions. In effect, the 
second vote made operative Dr. Wood's position as a tenured 
professor. 

In the case of Chancellor Golino, Ms. Hanson continued, 
the same sequence votes applied except that the Board had already 
accepted his resignation. It was now necessary to consider ad- 
ministrative leave and activation of his title as Professor. 

The vote concerning Dr. Patterson, Ms. Hanson continued, 
established his title as Interim President and set the salary for 
the position, by means of a salary adjustment. 

Trustee McNeil asked for an elaboration as to what 
approval of the personnel action, Doc. T78-038, would entail. Ms. 
Hanson said this would allow Dr. Wood to resume an 01 academic 
position as "Professor A," that is, as University Professor of 
Government. This was part of his original appointment. The 
salary indicated in the document was Dr. Wood's salary until the 
Board once again considered the matter at the end of his administra 
tive leave. Chairman Healey said the salary indicated was not per 
manent. Trustee Crain said it was his understanding that the mattie 
of the pay of University Professors was one which the Budget and 
Finance Committee had been asked to take under advisement. Ms. 
Hanson said it was her understanding that the Board would deal 
with the salaries for all University Professors within the coming 
six months. 



Chairman Healey said it should be made clear to the 
Board that approval of administrative leave for Dr. Wood did not 
involve a commitment by him to continue as a University Professor 
at the end of that leave. He could, if he chose, resign from 
the University completely. In response to Trustee McNeil's 
question, Ms. Hanson said this was also true in the case of Dr. 
Golino; in his case as well there would be a new salary recommenda 
tion as of July 31, 1978. Chairman Healey noted that if Dr. Wood 
were to continue as a tenured professor it would be at a salary 
as determined by the Board. 



Trustee Crain said he wished to be certain that the pro- 
posed actions were legal. Counsel Rosen said the documents at hand 
were expected to fulfill the intent of the Board's decision at the; 
November meeting. There were no legal constraints, as the granting 



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Df administrative leave was a matter of the Board's administrative 
discretion. 

Trustee Kassler asked if President Wood's appointment 
as a University Professor was effective as of the end of the ad- 
ninistrative leave. Ms. Hanson said that as both President Wood 
and Chancellor Golino were appointed originally as faculty with 
tenure, the votes at hand were not appointments to faculty titles. 
Trustee Kassler asked if the person holding the academic title 
could, while on administrative leave, receive an academic salary 
as well as an administrative one. Ms. Hanson said this was not 
possible. 

There was no further discussion, and it was moved and 
seconded and 



VOTED : 



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and further 



VOTED : 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
accept the resignation of Robert C. Wood 
from the Office of the President effective 
January 1, 1978 and to authorize administra- 
tive leave for six months with pay for Dr. 
Wood commencing January 1, 1978. 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve the Personnel Action as detailed 
in Doc. T78-038. 



and further 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize Carlo L. Golinoan administra- 
tive leave for six months with pay for 
the period February 1, 1978 to July 30, 1978 



and further 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve the Personnel Action as detailed 
in Trustee Doc. T78-039. 

The final vote was to formalize the Board's decision with respect 
to Professor Patterson. There was no discussion, and it was 
moved and seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the Personnel Action as detailed in Trustee 
Doc. T78-040. 

Chairman Healey said that the final item on the agenda, 
Salary Adjustments for Trust Fund Employees, had been referred 



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Exec. Comm. 
12/7/77 



Acceptance of 
Resignation of 
President Wood 
and Authoriza- 
tion of Adminis- 
trative Leave 



Authorization 
of Administra- 
tive Leave for 
Chancellor 
Golino 



Salary for 

Interim 

President 



Exec. Coram. 
12/7/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

:o the Committee on Budget and Finance. 

There was no further business to come before the 
Committee, and the meeting adjourned at 12:35 p.m. 



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Assistant to the Secretary 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUDGET AND FINANCE 

December 21, 1977; 3:30 p.m. 
Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 



Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Crain, President Wood; 
Trustees Dennis and Marks; Treasurer Brand; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Committee Members Absent : Trustees Gordon, Spiller, and Troy 

Office of the President : President Designate Patterson, 
Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic Affairs; Ms. Robinson, 
Vice President for Planning; Ms. Hanson, Budget Director and 
Associate Vice President; Mr. Hester, Associate Vice President 
for Business Services; Mr. Hogan, Controller; Ms. D'Esti, 
Associate Counsel 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. McBee, Vice Chancellor for 
Administration and Finance; Mr. Woodbury, Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Mr. Beatty, Director of the Office of Budget 
and Institutional Studies 

UM/Boston : Mr. Baxter, Vice Chancellor for Administration 
and Finance 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor for Administration 
and Finance 



The meeting came to order at 3:35 p.m. Chairman Crain Report on 
called for discussion on the agenda item, Report on Accounts Accounts 
Receivable System . Mr. Hogan said that this was one of the steps! Receivable 
being taken to improve the information and reporting systems of System 
the University In April, 1977, a University-wide Accounts 
Receivable Task Force had been established to determine which 
accounts receivable system would best fit the needs of the 
University as a whole. Each campus had formed working groups, 
co-chaired by the campus controller and bursar, to define in 
detail the specific needs of each campus and to identify the 
extant accounts receivable systems, computerized or manual, on 
each campus. The Data Processing Center was given the chore to 
identify and study computerized systems on the market or in use 
at other universities. 

The result of the seven month effort by the several 
groups and the Task Force was a decision to purchase the 
Billing/Receivables System of Information Associates, Inc., of 
Rochester, New York. The system was the only one which was 
designed specifically for colleges and universities, and it was 



B & F 
12/21/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

flexible enough to accommodate local conditions. The University's 
general ledger system was also an I.A.I product. A contract 
with I.A.I would be signed in January 1978, and the system would 
become operational in October, 1978. 

In answer to a question, Mr. Hogan said that while 
other users of the system had been queried as to their exper- 
iences, it had not been possible to visit their campuses. Rep- 
resentatives had gone to the home office of I.A.I, to see the 
system in operation. Trustee Dennis asked if the system would 
dovetail with the accounts receivable system at Worcester. 
Mr. Campbell said that patient billing would not be handled by 
the new system. Worcester could use that system only for student 
billing, grants and contracts, and ancillary charges. 



Mr. Hogan said the system would allow the campuses to 
consolidate all student charges — tuition, book store purchases, 
dormitory and library charges, etc. This was not possible at 
present. Trustee Dennis asked if the system would satisfy the 
Peat, Marwick & Mitchell recommendation in this area. Mr. Hogan 
said it would, and noted that other Peat, Marwick & Mitchell 
clients used the system. In response to Chairman Crain's ques- 
tion, Mr. Hogan said that the system was expected to be labor 
saving over the course of time. The experience of the Univer- 
sity was expected to match that of other users. The old system 
was so bad that the cost benefit of replacing it became secondary 
to increased control. Mr. Campbell said that at one campus with 
which he was familar, consolidation of bills had reduced postage 
costs alone by $16,000. 

Chairman Crain said he understood that damage control 
would not be a part of the system. Mr. Hester said that the 
system would enable the University to bill a student for a dorm- 
itory or damage deposit. Since it was not a fee, the deposit 
became a liability to be refunded. The I.A.I, system could be 
modified to allow recognition of assets. 

Chairman Crain asked about the funding for the system. 
Mr. Hogan said he and Mr. Hester had discussed this with the 
three Vice Chancellors of Administration and Finance and a 
funding formula had been agreed upon. Mr. Hester cautioned that 
installation of the system was going to require a great deal of 
work to fine tune it and to adjust it to the peculiarities of 
each campus. Chairman Crain said that those whose functions 
would be drastically changed by the new system should be 
thoroughly briefed on what the changes were and how it would 
affect them. 

Trustee Marks asked if it would be possible to receive 
a brief time frame of the major steps involved in the change- 
over. This would give the Trustees a reference with which to 
gauge the progress of the operation. Mr. Hogan said that a 
PERT type schedule would be used for the installation. Chairman 
Crain said it would be helpful to receive an update on the 
system in April. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting then discussed Report on Residence Halls — 
UM/Amherst. Mr. Beatty said that there were two major auxiliary 
enterprises at Amherst that were causing significant problems — 
one was the Campus Center, the other the Residence Hall system. 
Mr. Beatty said he would provide basic information on the 
Residence Halls, then respond to some of the comments and recom- 
mendations of various studies of the system, and then solicit 
Trustee approval for three specific recommendations. The studies 
included a management study, an audit and a physical facilities 
survey. 

The purposes of the Residence Hall system were to 
provide secure housing at a reasonable price, to provide a 
living/learning environment and to provide space for non- 
instructional, non-classroom activities and services. In the 41 
buildings there were 11,433 spaces for an undergraduate popu- 
lation of 18,700. 

The 16 buildings constructed between 1935 and 1963 
were under the aegis of the University of Massachusetts Building 
Association. The 25 buildings constructed between 1963 and 1971 
were under the control of the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority. 

One of the reasons for the change from the Association 
to the Authority was the refusal of the Commonwealth to provide 
capital outlays for the renovation of the dormitories. A resi- 
dence hall trust fund was established at the same time as the 
Authority, and fees for the dormitories were increased to provide 
funds for renovation. 

Mr. Beatty said that the 1963-71 building program was 
based on several key assumptions, none of which proved valid. It 
was assumed that the undergraduate student population would grow 
to 30,000, two-thirds of whom would reside in dormitories; that 
the character of the student population of the 1970' s would be 
the same as that of the 1960's; that students would continue to 
accept the in loco parentis role of the University; and that the 
economy of the Commonwealth would continue to flourish and funds 
for the University would continue to pour in. 

Because of the ongoing nature of the problems with the 
Residence Hall system the Trustees had asked for an in-depth 
study. The study had been completed and had been done in three 
parts — a study of the management, at a cost of $20,000; a finan- 
cial audit, cost of $25,000; and a physical facilities survey, 
cost of $96,000. 

The management study, Mr. Beatty continued, had made 
five major recommendations and many minor ones. The major ones 
were: 1) To have a single office managing the system; this had 
been done with the creation of the Office of Residential Resource 
Management; 2) to stabilize the organizational structure; 



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UM/Amherst 
Report on 
Residence 
Halls 



B & F 
12/21/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



3) to put the dormitory custodians under the Vice Chancellor 
for Student Affairs rather than the Vice Chancellor for Adminis- 
tration and Finance; this recommendation was still being con- 
sidered; 4) to formalize staff training; and 5) to make students 
aware of the rules and regulations of the residence halls and 
to enforce them. 

The financial audit included a number of recommend- 
ations. One major one had to do with the need for a re- 
interpretation of the Management and Services Agreements, one of 
which was made for each project between the University and the 
Building Authority. The agreements were somewhat restrictive 
and contradictory. Chairman Crain said that there were instances 
where the agreements provided for a flow of funds; for example, 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development had agreed to 
make an annual debt service subsidy grant to the Authority for 
the Twelfth Project residence halls; however, there was no 
indication of when and at what level the grants would be made. 
He said it looked like the agreements were structured when the 
Residence Hall system was much less complex. Chancellor Bromery 
said that if the provisions of the Management and Services 
Agreements were followed rigidly, it would bankrupt the system 
because monies could not be commingled. Mr. Woodbury said this 
situation led to the awkward arrangement of loans among projects 
In answer to Trustee Marks' question, Mr. Beatty said that 
seeking legislative relief would be recommended to the Trustees 
at a later date. 



Chairman Crain said it was his understanding that the 
lack of counsel's opinion on the legality of inter-project loans 
was based on the fact that counsel had been asked for an opinion 
not by the University Trustees but by the auditors, after the 
loans were actually made. Were counsel to be asked by the 
Trustees for a legal opinion on the question, such an opinion 
would be forthcoming. Ms. D'Esti said that counsel was pre- 
pared to render a legal opinion if the Trustees requested one. 
It was the opinion of counsel that the information sought by 
the auditors was not essential to the performance of the auditors' 
function. The request of the auditors was for an opinion of 
counsel on the question of the Trustees' liability in a number of 
situations. This could only be given by counsel if specifically 
authorized by the Board. The reason it was decided it would be 
improper for counsel to render an opinion on this question by 
the auditors was that once such a legal opinion became public, 
the attorney-client privilege could no longer be invoked by the 
Board. The decision to refuse the auditors' request was made in 
order to maintain that privilege. 



President Wood said that at the time financing for 
the Twelfth Project was being arranged, there were two ways 
open to the University — to seek H.U.D. dormitory construction 
funds, or to work through the Building Authority. The latter, 
the more conservative approach, was chosen strictly on market 
considerations. Treasurer Brand said that while the University 
did not always operate in the strict terms of the Management 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



and Services Agreement, it had received written statements from 
the Bond Counsel and from counsel for the Authority that permit- 
ted the University to operate in its own way. For example, the 
University does not have to comply with the weekly remittance 
provisions of the agreements because the Bond counsel had said 
this was allowed. Except for Projects One and Two, funds could 
be commingled. Chairman Crain asked if University counsel had 
seen the statements. Treasurer Brand said he did not know. 



Trustee Marks asked if the University had received 
similar statements from the Building Association. Mr. Brand 
said the arrangement with the Association was different from 
that with the Authority; it was a direct lease arrangement. 
Trustee Marks said that the arrangement with the Authority, 
where each project was a separate entity, would indicate that 
money from one project could not be transferred to another. 
However, it seemed that there was a nebulous agreement that the 
University could transfer funds for its convenience. This still 
left the legal questions as to whether this was allowable and as 
to the possible liability of the Board. Further, there was the 
possibility of discrepancies in the rent of fully amortized 
buildings vs. buildings with debt outstanding, and even dis- 
crepancies between Authority buildings and Association buildings. 
He said that the University needed either a legal opinion which 
would allow the transfer of funds, or else it would seek legis- 
lative relief. Mr. Brand said the statement he had received 
allowed money to flow between Projects Four through Twelve. He 
said it had always been his understanding that funds could move 
from the Residence Hall Trust Fund to the Authority, but that 
money from the Authority could not move to the Trust Fund. 
Trustee Marks said there were further complications — the bonds for 
the Building Association buildings were for residencies; at 
present there was an informal agreement allowing use of the 
buildings for administrative and teaching purposes. President 
Wood noted another problem — the question of who defines what con- 
stitutes an adequate surplus. 

Trustee Marks asked if the Management and Services 
Agreements served to control the flow of funds from one project 
to another. Chairman Crain said that at an earlier meeting he 
and Trustee Dennis had asked counsel for a reading on all of the 
implications and the liabilities associated with the Management 
and Services Agreements. He said he hoped the questions raised 
at this meeting would elicit from counsel a response to this 
very intricate matter. President Wood said that the capacity to 
renegotiate the Agreements would be crucial to the solution of the 
problems. 



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B & F 
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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



At Chairman Crain's request, Mr. Beatty resumed his 
report. Mr. Beatty said the auditors had also suggested that 
the University ask the Building Authority why dollar excess 
in the reserve funds had not been applied to reduce the Univer- 
sity's debt service payments, and that excess payments to the 
Building Association be used to reduce future lease payments. 
Action had been or would be taken on both suggestions. Further, 
the auditors had recommended improvements in the management 
and financial control aspects of the Residence Hall system, as 
well as determining the true cost of the system. Determining 
the true cost of the system, Mr. Beatty said, was difficult to 
project because of the impact of inflation and, for example, the 
inadequacies of the utilities metering system. However, the 
campus was moving toward true costs. Mr. Woodbury said that one 
thing that was very difficult to determine was the cost of pro- 
grams in the residence halls. It was known that there were 
faculty costs, etc., but these were almost impossible to cost 
precisely. 

The major source of income of the system was student 
fees, supplemented by a small contribution from the state. The 
major use of the funds was for debt service, followed in order 
by maintenance and repairs, utilities, salaries, furniture 
and equipment, and miscellaneous expenditures. He noted that 
the cost per bed space of debt service varied greatly from 
project to project. The cost per bed space in the older pro- 
jects was $92; in the newer ones it was over $500. If rental 
rates were to be set on a project by project basis, the Univer- 
sity would be charging a great deal less for the more desirable 
(sic) spaces in older projects and a great deal more for the 
less desirable (sic) spaces in the newer projects. 

Mr. Beatty said the physical facilities study, in 
addition to determining the present state of the dormitories, 
had answered three questions — the cost of restoring the building 
to their original condition, $4,000,000; the cost of bringing : 
the buildings into compliance with selected building code items 
(including $1,500,000 for handicapped access) $8,400,000; and 
the cost of selective modernization, $6,500,000. The total 
cost would be $18,900,000 in 1977 dollars. Two of the problems 
noted in the survey, fire and safety hazards and the overloaded 
electrical systems, would have to be addressed very soon. 
Mr. Woodbury said there was a reserve of $345,000 available 
which would be used to install smoke detectors throughout the 
system. 

Mr. Beatty concluded by noting that solving the 
problems of the system would take a long time. However, the 
campus would need Trustee support in three areas; first, in 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



renegotiating the Management and Services Agreements and, if 
possible, consolidating the present seven agreements into one, so 
that the dormitories could be managed as a system rather than as 
a series of projects; second, in seeking capital outlays. Third, 
in seeking the release of excess funds from both the Building 
Authority and the Building Association. Chairman Crain thanked 
Mr. Beatty for a helpful report. 

Trustee Marks said he had spent five years on the 
Building Association and that the Association found the solutions 
to the problems as perplexing as did the Board. The immediate 
question was where to go from here. He said that because of the 
nature of the problem and because there were territorial imper- 
atives involved, the problem did not appear to be one that could 
be addressed by a single standing committee of the Board. Per- 
haps what was needed was an ad hoc committee to address the many 
problems and the three principals, i.e., the University, the 
Authority and the Association. In his experience, he had found 
the Association to be more flexible than the Authority. 
President Wood agreed, noting that when the Authority had been 
approached with a view to gaining Authority support for handi- 
capped access modifications, the Authority had turned down the 
request because the Authority did not consider such modifications 
as critical to the maintenance of the buildings. 

Chairman Crain said he felt that what was needed first 
was counsel's definition of the agreements and their implications 
Then the Trustees could decide on a course of action. The 
recent fire at Providence College, which had caused several 
fatalities, made action even more imperative. It was his under- 
standing that if the Trustees were informed of hazardous situa- 
tions and did not take action, they were liable for damages. 

Trustee Marks said he felt a combined program was 
needed in order to get the Authority and the Association to move. 
Some of the problems went back twenty years and, if the problems 
were dealt . with piecemeal, the situation of the Authority 
waiting for the Association to move, and vice versa, might 
develop. While it might be possible to get a breakthrough with 
one, which could be used to goad the other, this should be 
part of a total strategy. Ms. Robinson said the Trustees should 
know that if a renegotiation of the Management and Services 
Agreements led to a refinancing of the dormitories, the cost of 
debt service would triple. The students would have to pay these 
costs if the Commonwealth did not agree to assume them. 

Chairman Crain said it was obvious that the situation 
was a very complex one. He said the administration would have to 
recommend actions for Board consideration. Trustee Marks said 
that only the administration had the overview necessary to con- 
struct a recommendation which would deal with both the legal 
and tactical aspects of a solution. However, dealing with the 



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12/21/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Authority and the Association might require direct Board action. 
President Wood said such a strategy proposal would be forth- 
coming after counsel had rendered an opinion. Chairman Crain 
said this was a matter of the highest priority. 



I 



Report on 

Salary 

Adjustments 



The meeting then heard the Report On Salary Adjust- 
ments. Ms. Hanson said that the Legislature had passed the so- 
called "bonus" bill, with authorized the Board to pay bonuses 
to those employees who had a bonus clause in their contracts 
and to others. Counsel was now deciding whether "authorize" 
meant "shall" or "may," and to whom. The bill contained some 
money for Amherst, Boston and the Medical School, but none for 
the Teaching Hospital, the Institutes or the President's Office 
The bill also set aside a reserve, under the control of the 
Department of Administration and Finance, to be used for other 
kinds of salary adjustments which will be specified in the 
pending Salary Scale Bill. The bill will mandate salary in- 
creases of 2.5 percent and $400 for non-union personnel. Un- 
fortunately, none of the monies in the bonus bill would be 
adequate for the University's needs. A further complication 
was that the Secretary of A & F and the House/ Senate Ways and 
Means Committees had differing interpretations of the bill. 
This was being explored. The Trustees would not be asked to 
deal with this matter until it was determined who would be 
paid and until the source of the additional funds could be 
identified. At that time the Board would also be asked to 
approve salary adjustments for trust fund employees. 

There was no further business to come before the 
meeting and the meeting adjourned at 5:03 p.m. 



I 




lohn F. Miller 
Assistant to the Secretary 
of the University 



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ATTENDANCE : 



Designate Patterson; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs 



Committee Members Absent : Trustees Batiste, Breyer, Burack, 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

December 22, 1977; 2:00 p.m. 
14th Floor Conference Room 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Troy; Interim President 



Fielding, Morgenthau and Winthrop 

Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs 



UM/Amherst : Mr. Allen, Dean, Humanities and Fine Arts 



The meeting came to order at 3:25 p.m. and it was agreed 
to enter executive session. 

It was agreed to end the executive session at 3:45 p.m. Without 
discussion it was 



VOTED : 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
concur in the award of tenure by the President 
to Elizabeth Will as Associate Professor of 
Classics at the University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst as set forth in Doc. T78-041. 



and further 



VOTED 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
concur in the award of tenure by the 
President to Joanne Tanner, as Associate 
Professor of Music and Dance at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Amherst as set 
forth in Doc. T78-042. 



There was no further business to come before the 
Committee, and the meeting was adjourned at 3:47 p.m. 



I 




JHhn F. Miller 
Assistant to the Secretary 
to the Board of Trustees 



Executive 
Session 



UM/Amherst — 
Award of Tenure 
to Elizabeth 
Will, Associate 
Professor of 
Classics 
(Doc. T78-041) 



UM/Amherst — 
Award of Tenure 
to Joanne 
Tanner , 
Associate 
Professor of 
Music and Dance 
(Doc. T78-042) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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